Search found 434 matches

by Gulliver
Mon Feb 19, 2018 12:57 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: British Sitcoms
Replies: 35
Views: 3024

Re: British Sitcoms

I grew up on a steady diet of British sitcoms. Red Dwarf, Are You Being Served?, Fawlty Towers , and several others. I'm pretty sure it's what contributed to my comparatively dry sense of humor that many of my peers have misunderstood over the years. I also loved many Canadian shows as a teen, most...
by Gulliver
Wed Dec 06, 2017 4:21 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: Happy Things Thread
Replies: 969
Views: 250885

Re: Happy Things Thread

Little happy thing: This forum still exists! I first discovered it over fourteen years ago! It was crazy to discover that other people made up languages for fun and it was an influencing factor in me going on to studying linguistics at university up to post-graduate level. So, thank you, everyone.
by Gulliver
Wed Dec 06, 2017 4:14 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: Aspies and peer pressure
Replies: 14
Views: 1940

Re: Aspies and peer pressure

Huh. Never encountered the idea of "underage" in an alcohol context, other than regarding the US. The legal drinking age in the UK, incidentally, is 5, other than for medical or emergency purposes.* How odd - I'd regard "underage drinking" as pretty much standard UK shorthand for "purchasing and dr...
by Gulliver
Sun Feb 05, 2017 4:47 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: How to make a language with a profound foreign influence
Replies: 21
Views: 3407

Re: How to make a language with a profound foreign influence

Richard W wrote:
Gulliver wrote:The OED mentions a Chaucer manusript with a mixed form of ON they, OE her, OE em .
The third form is still present in Modern English.
Give em hell Oh wow yes it is. It had never occurred to me that that wasn't a contraction of them. Magic.
by Gulliver
Wed Feb 01, 2017 3:22 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Tactile Diglossia
Replies: 1
Views: 684

Re: Tactile Diglossia

I remember hearing about Braille being at risk of decline because of the prevalence of decent screen readers and TTS software, Braille tales up more physical space than visually-recieved textand relies on special equipment so braille books tend to be very large and limited in range. Other tactile al...
by Gulliver
Mon Jan 09, 2017 7:19 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: How to make a language with a profound foreign influence
Replies: 21
Views: 3407

Re: How to make a language with a profound foreign influence

pronouns to be borrowed into languages Äynu has borrowed pronouns, numbers and lots of other vocabulary from Persian, even though it's a Turkic language spoken in China. Unfortunately, almost no research has been done on it that I know of (or at least none that is freely available online except ver...
by Gulliver
Wed Oct 05, 2016 2:31 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Favorite/least favorite features from natlangs
Replies: 59
Views: 5886

Re: Favorite/least favorite features from natlangs

Welsh ...Don't like: Dd and f sound the same to me half the time. Th and ff sound the same to me half the time. Ch and ll sound the same to me half the time. For the first two its possibly people carrying over Southern English sounds changes. The second one is probably people having a hard time dis...
by Gulliver
Wed Oct 05, 2016 1:57 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Favorite/least favorite features from natlangs
Replies: 59
Views: 5886

Re: Favorite/least favorite features from natlangs

Welsh I like the attitude of Welsh speakers. If you can more or less speak Welsh, kinda, you can speak Welsh. Due to the way that almost everyone in Wales speaks a bit of Welsh and there is a sizeable native speaker population, there is quite a lot of acceptance to people who kinda speak it but try...
by Gulliver
Tue Sep 20, 2016 7:40 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Spanish Etymology?
Replies: 8
Views: 1649

Re: Spanish Etymology?

Wikipedia says it's coincidental without giving any citations, and think it is very likely to be the case. Italian for el is il , which is similar enough to suggest that it was an internally drive change, rather than influenced by Arabic. When languages are similar and the social situation puts a l...
by Gulliver
Tue Sep 06, 2016 9:54 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Numbers from 1 to 10 updated
Replies: 98
Views: 10460

Re: Numbers from 1 to 10 updated

I can't find any sign of the English sheep-counting numbers of Brythonic origins in the file. But are these any more notable than numbers in any non-standard dialect of English/Anglic variety/whatever indigenous to Britain? So far, all there is there is English and Scots (and that too apparently on...
by Gulliver
Wed Jul 06, 2016 2:40 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: [ɜ] and [œ] in English for NURSE vowels
Replies: 14
Views: 2049

Re: [ɜ] and [œ] in English for NURSE vowels

Travis B. wrote:The last place where I wrote "DRESS" I really meant "NURSE", and I corrected it to "NURSE" after you quoted it.
Regardless, I had fun.

(But I realised that and carried on, I think. I can't remember. I've just taken a load of pain meds so I'm surprised I'm even moderately coherent.)
by Gulliver
Wed Jul 06, 2016 2:37 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: [ɜ] and [œ] in English for NURSE vowels
Replies: 14
Views: 2049

Re: [ɜ] and [œ] in English for NURSE vowels

Conventionally, the NURSE vowel in RP is transcribed using [ɜ]. At the same time, the backed DRESS vowel found in my own dialect is probably best transcribed with [ɜ]. However, the two sound absolutely nothing alike, and to my ears the RP NURSE vowel sounds much more like [œ] while my DRESS vowel s...
by Gulliver
Thu Jun 30, 2016 1:57 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Help your fluency in a nifty way
Replies: 4604
Views: 653526

Re: Help your fluency in a nifty way

There's a few weird register things going on here. The whole thing seems to be written in generally standard-ish Welsh which is what I'll correct to. Most of it is just getting mutations right (direct objects, after pan and ar ), use of synthetic verbs ( nes i is colloquial but other stuff like you...
by Gulliver
Wed Jun 29, 2016 4:04 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Help your fluency in a nifty way
Replies: 4604
Views: 653526

Re: Help your fluency in a nifty way

Jag skulle läsa på andra språk om jag kunde. I would read in other languages if I could. Als ich 18 oder 19 war, bin ich nach Deutschland im Urlaub gegangen und da habe ich ein Buch gekauft das ich schon gelesen auf Englisch hatte ( Total verhext von Terry Pratchett) und danach habe ich es, langsam...
by Gulliver
Wed Jun 29, 2016 3:28 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Help your fluency in a nifty way
Replies: 4604
Views: 653526

Re: Help your fluency in a nifty way

Je suis un peu jaloux de Théodore Roosevelt. Quand il avait 15 ans, déjà avec une bonne maîtrise de français, ses parents, insatisfaits de sa maîtrise d'allemand (ainsi que les autres enfants), les ont envoyés à Dresden pendant 5 mois avec le seul but d'améliorer leur allemand . Moi, je ne connais ...
by Gulliver
Sat Jan 09, 2016 8:33 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Accents
Replies: 25
Views: 3765

Re: Accents

My accent is a weird mix of Welsh and West Country. This is due to living in Gloucestershire and then moving to Mid Wales. My cousins in Gloucestershire have noitced and started teasing me about my Welsh accent... :x They're in no position to poke fun with a West Country accent. :-D Mine floats bet...
by Gulliver
Sat Jan 09, 2016 8:23 am
Forum: None of the above
Topic: Sentences that contain the whole alphabet
Replies: 10
Views: 2378

Re: Sentences that contain the whole alphabet

We can hardly mention the topic without citing the 26-letter Cwm fjord-bank glyphs vext quiz . (Using the Welsh cwm is a bit of a stretch... on the other hand, this sentence will teach you a neat word! What seems weirder these days is the sense 'strange person' for quiz .). Vext is what struck me a...
by Gulliver
Sat Aug 22, 2015 7:03 am
Forum: None of the above
Topic: Member Countries and Known Languages
Replies: 130
Views: 24570

Re: Member Countries and Known Languages

I'm English, grew up in the Southeast, now living in the Southwest, near Bath. My accent oscillates betwixt "posh" (southeast middle class educated) and an unholy and abominable combination of both dialects and accents (I fuck up my th's and pronounce dark L's like W's but also get a bit rhotic when...
by Gulliver
Tue Jun 30, 2015 3:13 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: Happy Things Thread
Replies: 969
Views: 250885

Re: Happy Things Thread

I knew a lot of friendly Germans. Very few of them, however, worked in service positions. An American who'd lived there longer than me advised me once, "Just remember that any conversation an employee is having with another employee is more important than talking to you". After a while I got used t...
by Gulliver
Thu Jun 04, 2015 2:32 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: What do you say for X?
Replies: 6
Views: 1188

Re: What do you say for X?

All mouth and trousers is the one I've heard. It means gobby little nobber, or maybe being a bit rah but also being a twat. Probably uses the phrase "top bants" and supports fox hunting because it exercises the dogs.
by Gulliver
Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:25 am
Forum: None of the above
Topic: Linguistic Struggles Thread
Replies: 97
Views: 17842

Re: Linguistic Struggles Thread

I'm learning Welsh by audio course in the car during my commutes, and I have real problems differentiating ff /f/ and th /θ/ and between f /v/ and dd /ð/. I come from the Souf East of England and perhaps I've got more of a "suvvern" accent than I thought I had. I'm aware that they occasionally slip ...
by Gulliver
Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:18 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: What part of speech is "quote ... unquote"?
Replies: 13
Views: 1530

Re: What part of speech is "quote ... unquote"?

The OED lists it as an imperative verb, which I am not sure I wholly agree with. The entry is rather short.

I suppose it's interpreted as a sort of imperative-to-self. COMMENCE QUOTING! DESIST QUOTING! sorta thing.
by Gulliver
Sat Apr 11, 2015 6:49 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Any examples of this English accent?
Replies: 6
Views: 881

Re: Any examples of this English accent?

Here's a clip of the old girl in action. I would say it's a very early form of RP. She studied at RADA, which is an acting school, so I imagine it's a learnt/trained accent (as RP largely was, although it did exist in some family settings, particularly if the parents went to a "good" boarding schoo...
by Gulliver
Mon Feb 16, 2015 8:51 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Language Acquisition
Replies: 17
Views: 2238

Re: Language Acquisition

Are you talking about first or second language acquisition? They are very different things. Could you follow references in the article you have?
by Gulliver
Tue Nov 18, 2014 2:44 am
Forum: None of the above
Topic: ZBB member photos, part 5. (Something for the weekend, sir?)
Replies: 5496
Views: 306086

Re: ZBB member photos, part 5. (Something for the weekend, s

Kereb wrote:jesus fuck gulliver that is fuckin dope

please tell me there's a less distorted photo of that makeup job
#nofilterrrrr
It's not distorted, it was just taken indoors by (mostly) candlelight with a dirty camera. I am, as you say, fuckin dope.