Search found 96 matches

by Lleu
Sun Nov 20, 2011 3:47 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Hispanic Gothic
Replies: 20
Views: 6936

Re: Hispanic Gothic

Woah, I'm popular all of a sudden! I think I said the consonant assimilation thing without having actually come up with its rules, but I'm doing that now. Fortunately, they're all the same as Liturgical Gothic: - final - b , - v and - d devoice to - f , - f , and - th , respectively, in the preterit...
by Lleu
Wed Jun 22, 2011 9:40 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: How do you pronounce "Wikipedia"?
Replies: 136
Views: 7007

Re: How do you pronounce "Wikipedia"?

Someone bitched me out for having instead of [@] for the second vowel and I got curious. whut i'm genuinely surprised not more people have [wɪki] there, and at the amount of people who have [wɪkɪ] or [wɪkə]... I suppose it's because it's part of a compound though (it's thrown my own judgement into ...
by Lleu
Fri Jun 10, 2011 2:35 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Language Instruction in Different Countries
Replies: 86
Views: 5453

Re: Language Instruction in Different Countries

I went to private schools in the United States. At the school I went to from pre-kindergarten to grade 8 (ages 4 to 14), we started Spanish in lower school (grades 1-5, ages 6-11) grade 4 (ages 9-10), but for grades 4 and 5 it was a joke. We mostly sang songs and learned random nouns. I think we did...
by Lleu
Sun May 29, 2011 5:16 pm
Forum: Conlangery & Conworlds
Topic: Lexicon Building
Replies: 4308
Views: 405108

Re: Lexicon Building

Valsadrian: atsopat : lame Boringly, derived from Italian azzoppato "made lame". A periphrase, dudira fit (literally "to be broken", but implying the permanence of the state of broken-ness) is also used (slightly differently). One might say pèġa bor atsopat "he is lame" or müara chidus ( am pèġaca )...
by Lleu
Fri May 27, 2011 8:09 am
Forum: None of the above
Topic: What are you listening to? -- Non-English Edition
Replies: 1735
Views: 170834

Re: What are you listening to? -- Non-English Edition

"Mon amie la rose" — Françoise Hardy
by Lleu
Sat May 14, 2011 10:04 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: What are you listening to? -- Non-English Edition
Replies: 1735
Views: 170834

Re: What are you listening to? -- Non-English Edition

"Aftur Heim" — Sjonni Brink
by Lleu
Sat May 14, 2011 2:47 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Hispanic Gothic
Replies: 20
Views: 6936

Re: Hispanic Gothic

I'm going to throw out a bunch of tables and go from there. Strong Verb Ablaut inf. prt.sg. prt.pl. ps.prt. ex. class I -i- -ie- -e- -e- a bita "bite": a bita, biet, beto, betana class II -o- -ue- -o- -o- a txoha "lead": a txoha, a txueh, txoho, txohana class III -e- -a- -o- -o- a vertha "become": a...
by Lleu
Fri May 13, 2011 9:07 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: What are you listening to? -- Non-English Edition
Replies: 1735
Views: 170834

Re: What are you listening to? -- Non-English Edition

"E Horo" — Mary Jane Lamond
by Lleu
Wed May 11, 2011 7:40 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Learn Northern Germanic the exciting way
Replies: 93
Views: 8786

Re: Learn Northern Germanic the exciting way

å heite , being a weak verb It always seemed to me like an odd word to me, having a weak present tense and a strong past tense (even though a weak conjugation for this tense is allowed in Nynorsk too). It's cognate to Gothic háitan , which is a class VII strong verb, the reduplicated preterites. Th...
by Lleu
Sat May 07, 2011 3:59 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Hispanic Gothic
Replies: 20
Views: 6936

Re: Hispanic Gothic

Verbal Morphology: Introduction [/size] I'm going to start with an overview of the Gothic verb, then talk about how the Hispanic Gothic verb differs from the Gothic verb. The Gothic verb inflects for three finite moods (indicative, optative, and imperative), two non-finite moods (infinitive, partic...
by Lleu
Sat Apr 30, 2011 1:04 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Ancient Greek Questions
Replies: 22
Views: 1860

Re: Ancient Greek Questions

Excellent, thanks! You're welcome! One other question on personal endings– the present second & third singular. According to the book on historical linguistics I'm reading, they at one point both had the form ει, and the sigma in the second was restored on analogy with the second & third aorist. Ho...
by Lleu
Sat Apr 30, 2011 12:30 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Ancient Greek Questions
Replies: 22
Views: 1860

Re: Ancient Greek Questions

Firstly, why is it that the aorist and future tend to share a stem, from which the present differs (obviously excluding sigmatic 1st aorists and the corresponding futures), for example, γίγνομαι versus γνήσομαι & ἐγενόμην, ἀποθνῄσκω versus ἀποθανέομαι & ἀπέθανον, or μανθάνω versus μαθήσομαι & ἔμαθο...
by Lleu
Sat Apr 30, 2011 10:30 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Greek ethnonyms in English
Replies: 8
Views: 1113

Re: Greek ethnonyms in English

I think English mostly just uses the -(a)n suffix, as someone from Sparta is a Spartan, from Athens an Athenian, and presumably someone from Stag(e)ira would be Stag(e)iran. There is an English word "sybarite" but it's acquired a meaning more along the lines of "hedonist", so that would probably be...
by Lleu
Fri Apr 29, 2011 3:37 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Hispanic Gothic
Replies: 20
Views: 6936

Re: Hispanic Gothic

Adjectival morphology is pretty straightforward. A very few adjectives follow nominal inflection patterns ( mambo "ready", e.g., is u-stem), but most adjectives follow a separate pattern, given below. There are two sets of adjectival endings: "weak" and "strong". All adjectives in predicates (e.g. "...
by Lleu
Wed Apr 27, 2011 10:58 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: The Official ZBB Quote Thread
Replies: 2878
Views: 389231

Re: The Official ZBB Quote Thread

Drydic Guy wrote:
Xephyr wrote:A mysterious, unknown language he's been spontaneously talking in since as long as he could speak?
...

Well, Phrygian of course.
HE DOES NOT SAY BEKOS

YOUR ARGUEMENT IS INVALID
Herodotus.
by Lleu
Wed Apr 27, 2011 2:03 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Hispanic Gothic
Replies: 20
Views: 6936

Re: Hispanic Gothic

Masculine and neuter jo-stems. They're not actually all that complicated. Their singular ending (both masculine and neuter) is -i ; the masculine plural is -as , the neuter plural -a . However, the plural forms will diphthongize the vowel in the previous syllable, adding -/i/, if they can. Examples:...
by Lleu
Tue Apr 26, 2011 1:23 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Hispanic Gothic
Replies: 20
Views: 6936

Re: Hispanic Gothic

Time for some morphology. Specifically: nominal morphology, which is fairly easy — just those pesky jo-stems. Nouns! They're great. They're also a lot less complex than Gothic nouns were. As in proto-Romance, the genitive and dative were subsumed by the accusative as a prepositional object case and ...
by Lleu
Mon Apr 25, 2011 11:59 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Hispanic Gothic
Replies: 20
Views: 6936

Re: Hispanic Gothic

Oh god this is badass. Why <y>? Does, for example, /J/ contrast with /nj/? And why just <q> instead of <qu>? <q> is a holdover from Gothic — qoppa is used for /k_w/. At present I don't think /J/ contrasts with /nj/ except across morpheme boundaries; I can't think of a contrastive example offhand, b...
by Lleu
Mon Apr 25, 2011 6:14 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Hispanic Gothic
Replies: 20
Views: 6936

Hispanic Gothic

The idea for a conlang derived from Gothic has been in my mind since I first started studying Gothic. Inspired by Ill Bethisad's ill-detailed Vissi and my class on the history and culture of medieval Spain this semester, I went with Spain as a setting. Its existence is predicated on the Visigoths' d...
by Lleu
Mon Apr 25, 2011 2:23 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: ZBB Census
Replies: 356
Views: 41419

Re: ZBB Census

Age bracket: 18-24 Gender: male Nationality: New England State/Province/Other Subdivision: home is Massachusetts, school is Connecticut Occupation: student Sexual Orientation: homosexual Status: single Native Language: English Secondary Languages: [by rough level of competence] French, Spanish, Gree...
by Lleu
Tue Apr 19, 2011 8:07 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: The Official ZBB Quote Thread
Replies: 2878
Views: 389231

Re: The Official ZBB Quote Thread

[quote="linguoboy, in "The Welsh Copula","]Any time I hear rydw I'm like "OH NOES! Cymraeg Byw claims another victim from beyond the grave!"[/quote]
Maybe it's just me, but I really enjoyed this reaction.
by Lleu
Tue Apr 19, 2011 8:03 pm
Forum: None of the above
Topic: What are you reading, watching and listening to?
Replies: 469
Views: 72455

Re: What are you reading, watching and listening to?

À l'écoute : "Comin' Back Soon (Bereft Man's Song)" — Crash Test Dummies Reading: I am just now taking a break from my Greek homework, which tonight is finishing off the Lattimore translation of the Odyssey . Other books I am in the middle of: Liechtenstein: A Modern History (David Beattie), Le Souf...