Search found 556 matches

by TaylorS
Fri Nov 11, 2016 5:39 pm
Forum: L&L Museum
Topic: Bizarre Sound Changes
Replies: 190
Views: 53625

Re: Bizarre Sound Changes

English ɡenerally has [ɻ] or [ɹ] while some dialects have [ʁ] Which English dialects have [ʁ]???? [ɔzɛʁ zan fʁɛnʃ pipɔl]??? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northumbrian_Burr It's apparently somewhat out-dated and pretty rare, though... Someone posted on here a long time ago a link that showed that in ...
by TaylorS
Fri Nov 11, 2016 5:31 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Native speakers giving misleading information
Replies: 86
Views: 14266

Re: Native speakers giving misleading information

I've noticed that a lot of younger Minnesotans having "accent denial", that is, thinking they speak General American, even when their accent is pretty clear. I suspect it is because a lot of people think a "Minnesota Accent" is their grandparents' immigrant-influenced affectations.
by TaylorS
Fri Nov 11, 2016 5:23 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Gulf-golf merger and the diachronics of /ʌl/ > /ɔl/ in NAE
Replies: 10
Views: 2571

Re: Gulf-golf merger and the diachronics of /ʌl/ > /ɔl/ in N

Travis B. wrote:
TaylorS wrote:I also appear to have a form of this merger, though the merged vowel can vary from /ʌ/ to /ɑ/. depending on how strongly the word is stressed.
Are you cot-caught merged?
Yes, my single low-back vowel varies from [ɑ] to [ɔ] depending on environment.
by TaylorS
Sat Nov 05, 2016 10:12 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The "How do You Pronounce X" Thread
Replies: 3108
Views: 287994

Re: The "How do You Pronounce X" Thread

Nynorsk/Bokmål aren't something that's a part of my normal spoken vocab so I can't say for sure I'd nativize them if they ever came up, when reading my "mental voice" doesn't. Friulian: fɻˁʷɪʉ̯ɫiɨn Nynorsk: nʏno̞ʂk ~ nɪʉ̯no̞ɻsk Bokmål: buk̚mo̞l ~ bɒk̚mɒɫ Belarus: bɛɫəɻˁʷʉʊ̯s [fɹʷiːˈɯːɫjɘn] [ˈniːnɔɹ...
by TaylorS
Sat Nov 05, 2016 9:49 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The "How do You Pronounce X" Thread
Replies: 3108
Views: 287994

Re: The "How do You Pronounce X" Thread

Three Arthritis Asthma They Brother I pronounce them as closely as I can to RP (sorry America, I don't like [ɹ̠ʷ]): [ˈθɹ̠ʷiː] [ˈɑːθɹ̠ʷäɪ̯tɪs] [ˈæsθmə] [ðe̞ɪ̯] [bɹ̠ʷɒðə], but I still (it's 3 years since I discovered IPA etc.) can't distinguish 'three'-'free' and 'breathe'-'breve' and I want to ask y...
by TaylorS
Sat Nov 05, 2016 9:32 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Gulf-golf merger and the diachronics of /ʌl/ > /ɔl/ in NAE
Replies: 10
Views: 2571

Re: Gulf-golf merger and the diachronics of /ʌl/ > /ɔl/ in N

I also appear to have a form of this merger, though the merged vowel can vary from /ʌ/ to /ɑ/. depending on how strongly the word is stressed.
by TaylorS
Sat Nov 05, 2016 7:50 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: H/æ/lloween versus H/ɑ/lloween
Replies: 17
Views: 2511

Re: H/æ/lloween versus H/ɑ/lloween

I say /æ/, I assume because I pronounce "hallow" with an /æ/.
by TaylorS
Sat Jan 16, 2016 4:29 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The Innovative Usage Thread
Replies: 2452
Views: 213591

Re: The Innovative Usage Thread

I think I am being assimilated into the "on accident" areal zone... :o
by TaylorS
Sat Jan 16, 2016 3:50 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: European languages before Indo-European
Replies: 812
Views: 99384

Re: European languages before Indo-European

Salmoneus wrote:Ockham's Razor suggests the Beakerfolk in Ireland were probably IE-speakers, of an unknown early branch, perhaps or perhaps not a cousin of Italo-Celtic (perhaps Lusitanian is a parallel here - similar things have been suggested for it).
It's so nice when my own conjectures are corraborated. :-D
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 31, 2015 8:24 pm
Forum: Conlangery & Conworlds
Topic: Post your conlang's phonology
Replies: 2278
Views: 278167

Re: Post your conlang's phonology

NW European language isolate with French-influenced orthography: /m n ɲ/ m n gn /p t tʃ k/ p t ch c /b d dʒ g/ b d j g /f s ʃ x/ f s sh h /j l r~ʁ/ y l r / ɛ e i/ ai e i /a œ ø y/ a eu oi u / ɔ o u/ au o ou Fricatives are voiced between vowels. Voiceless stops are lightly aspirated. Syllable-initial...
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 31, 2015 7:33 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: European languages before Indo-European
Replies: 812
Views: 99384

Re: European languages before Indo-European

Actually, I think that quite supports my line of argument. What we see is that time and again, when there have been major technological developments, like agriculture or pastoralism or metallurgy, there have been big family expansions. We can even see that this has happened in pre-agricultural soci...
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 31, 2015 7:22 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: European languages before Indo-European
Replies: 812
Views: 99384

Re: European languages before Indo-European

The comparison to California and North America seems unjustified to me. In Europe at the time of the IE influx, we are dealing with settled agricultural communities, the product of relatively recent influx and population expansion with the spread of agriculture. The result is a relatively genetical...
by TaylorS
Fri Oct 23, 2015 10:01 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: European languages before Indo-European
Replies: 812
Views: 99384

Re: European languages before Indo-European

This is indeed interesting. Yet, I would be very careful linking genetic markers with language families! Language shifts are way too common to consider them a marginal phenomenon. That is very true. But in any case I really suggest getting the book, it's a great read in general despite possible fla...
by TaylorS
Wed Oct 21, 2015 8:20 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The "How do You Pronounce X" Thread
Replies: 3108
Views: 287994

Re: The "How do You Pronounce X" Thread

Sumelic wrote: Some additional words:
  • haiku
  • samurai
  • ouroboros
  • uroboros
/ˈhaɪku/ [ˈhʌɪkɯ]
/ˈsæməɹaɪ/ [ˈsæməɹˤɑɪ]
/ˌuɹoˈboɹos/ [ɹ̩ˤoˈboɹˤos]
/ˌjuɹoˈboɹos/ [jɹ̩ˤoˈboɹˤos]
by TaylorS
Wed Oct 21, 2015 7:45 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: European languages before Indo-European
Replies: 812
Views: 99384

Re: European languages before Indo-European

I can't remember if I have already mentioned it, but archaeologist Jean Manco in her book Ancestral Journeys argues that Italo-Celtic speakers had already dispersed as far as Iberia by the time that the Bell Beaker style developed (a dispersion marked by the spread of Yamnaya-type anthropomorphic s...
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 17, 2015 10:35 pm
Forum: Conlangery & Conworlds
Topic: Sound Change Quickie Thread
Replies: 2827
Views: 340755

Re: Sound Change Quickie Thread

Is /ph th kh/ > /pf ts kx/ > /f ts k/ plausible? Yes. The first step essentially happened in southern German dialects (the "Proto-German" voiceless stops probably were aspirated); /pf/ > /f/ is currently happening in German (school teachers are fighting an uphill battle against it, saying things li...
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 17, 2015 10:24 pm
Forum: Conlangery & Conworlds
Topic: Sound Change Quickie Thread
Replies: 2827
Views: 340755

Re: Sound Change Quickie Thread

sangi39 wrote: IIRC, /ð/ may have become /ɣ/ at some point in the history of Irish Gaelic before becoming /j/ when slender. I wonder, then if /θ/ could similarly shift to /x/. /ð/ can also become /r/ and /θ/ can become /h/.
Would /ðə/ > /ɣə/ > /ɰə/ > /u/ be plausible?
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 17, 2015 10:08 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Origins of ACC
Replies: 22
Views: 4186

Re: Origins of ACC

Pole, the wrote:Similarly, penis and its synonyms tend to be animate even though other body parts don't.
Probably because it has a mind of it's own? :-D
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 17, 2015 10:07 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Origins of ACC
Replies: 22
Views: 4186

Re: Origins of ACC

Thank you, WeepingElf :) however, there's another question, how can an accusative marker spread to every word regardless of the definiteness or animacy? by analogy? Yes. ok :) thank you :) You can see the process at work in contemporary Spanish. Originally, a personal was only used with human objec...
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 17, 2015 9:57 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: European languages before Indo-European
Replies: 812
Views: 99384

Re: European languages before Indo-European

Ack, and I've been so busy with a new job I completely forgot about that fictional isolate that I said I was going to do! GAHHHH! :(
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 17, 2015 9:55 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: European languages before Indo-European
Replies: 812
Views: 99384

Re: European languages before Indo-European

I am bumping this old thread because I have changed my mind on some things. I used to maintain the idea that the Beaker culture was a movement of refugees from Central Europe, fleeing the (Indo-European) Corded Ware invasion and spreading a Central European para-IE language across Western Europe, a...
by TaylorS
Sat Oct 17, 2015 9:28 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The "How do You Pronounce X" Thread
Replies: 3108
Views: 287994

Re: The "How do You Pronounce X" Thread

linguoboy wrote:catalpa

(For those who don't know, it's the name of a native North American tree, which we called "cigar trees" growing up.)
I have always heard it stressed on the 2nd syllable.

/kəˈtælpə/
[ˈktʰæɰpə]
by TaylorS
Mon Apr 27, 2015 10:34 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The Innovative Usage Thread
Replies: 2452
Views: 213591

Re: The Innovative Usage Thread

Using they in a singular way is stupid, so I don't use it. IF you must be gender neutral, use he/she, as this is done in all sorts of publications anyway (at least they do it in Dutch, hij/zij). Swedish now also has this gender-neutral pronoun thing, and of course because Sweden is so incredibly pr...
by TaylorS
Wed Feb 18, 2015 12:57 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The Great Proto-Indo-European Thread
Replies: 2225
Views: 223654

Re: The Great Proto-Indo-European Thread

What do you think of this ? Apparently, there is genetic evidence for a sort of a "kurgan" scenario. The IE family tree given in the paper looks nice, too, though I'd rather group Armenian with Greek than with Tocharian. (I have no opinion on the placement of Albanian, though.) four Corded Ware peo...
by TaylorS
Sat Jan 31, 2015 2:38 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The Great Proto-Indo-European Thread
Replies: 2225
Views: 223654

Re: The Great Proto-Indo-European Thread

WeepingElf wrote:Also, languages are known to spread much faster than genes. "Language shift", i.e. communities adopting a new language, is actually quite common.
Hence my original question above. :)