Search found 97 matches

by Radagast
Tue Nov 23, 2010 3:53 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Culture statistics resources
Replies: 60
Views: 6050

Re: Culture statistics resources

Dear Salmoneus allow me to illustrate at this point the conversation that I am participating in: It seems to support the meme that "in ancient societies men hunted while women gathered" Torco mentions a meme - the notion that in ancient societies men hunt and women gathered. It is pretty common in m...
by Radagast
Tue Nov 23, 2010 1:30 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Culture statistics resources
Replies: 60
Views: 6050

Re: Culture statistics resources

I don't understand what point Rad is making. How does ethnocentrism explain why women don't hunt as much as men? Ethnocentrism relates to the relation between societies, not within societies. And if you're saying that WE'RE being ethnocentric, I'm not sure how, since most of us don't have hunting a...
by Radagast
Tue Nov 23, 2010 7:47 am
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Culture statistics resources
Replies: 60
Views: 6050

Re: Culture statistics resources

I think it means something like "giving an insincere appearance of cooperativeness or interest while concealing an ulterior motive that is in fact contrary to that which one gives the appearance of having." - similar in meaning to being "facetious" I have heard some people using it to mean the oppos...
by Radagast
Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:13 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Culture statistics resources
Replies: 60
Views: 6050

Re: Culture statistics resources

And why is that? (btw I don't think "disingenious" means what you think it means)
by Radagast
Mon Nov 22, 2010 8:35 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Culture statistics resources
Replies: 60
Views: 6050

Re: Culture statistics resources

Curan Roshac wrote:
Radagast wrote:It is pretty common in most hunter gatherer cultures yes.
I wonder what the underlying cause would be for this effect. Most "answers" that are given to the aforementioned meme strike me as conjectural at best.
I think the simple cause is "ethnocentrism".
by Radagast
Mon Nov 22, 2010 6:55 pm
Forum: C&C Archive
Topic: Culture statistics resources
Replies: 60
Views: 6050

Re: Culture statistics resources

It is pretty common in most hunter gatherer cultures yes.
by Radagast
Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:07 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Tocharian
Replies: 5
Views: 1133

Re: Tocharian

He requested "a book on Tocharian" and now he wants to ask which one to hope he'll get?
by Radagast
Sun Nov 21, 2010 9:38 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Pirahã recursion - new interpretation of data
Replies: 24
Views: 3385

Re: Re:

Atom wrote:Everett believes that Pirahã mothers do not use "baby talk".
This is not at all a controversial claim. Loads of cultures have been shown not to have a register of baby talk. Samoan and Kaluli for starters.
by Radagast
Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:40 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Dexis/Demonstrative
Replies: 30
Views: 2317

Re: Dexis/Demonstrative

That is tautological of course. But the point is that I am fairly sure that most evidence points to believing that deixis does precede language and that language in a human sense therefore presupposes deixis.
by Radagast
Wed Nov 10, 2010 10:27 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Dexis/Demonstrative
Replies: 30
Views: 2317

Re: Dexis/Demonstrative

The deal is that you'd be avoiding them. The question is can we conceive of adevelopment where humans become aware of others and of speaking to others without also creating words that adress the relations between speakers and others and the space where speaking occurs - I personally don't think it i...
by Radagast
Tue Nov 09, 2010 8:03 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Dexis/Demonstrative
Replies: 30
Views: 2317

Re: Dexis/Demonstrative

I don't know how that would be possible. Can speakers even begin to speak with each other without deictic pronouns (you/ I for example)?
by Radagast
Tue Nov 09, 2010 2:08 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Dexis/Demonstrative
Replies: 30
Views: 2317

Re: Dexis/Demonstrative

And its a cognitive ability that probably existed before the emergence of the genus homo. Tomasello argues that language did not evolve form primate vocal communication but from primate gestural communication. This would probably mean that deixis at the root of human language. As an exercise Zelos ...
by Radagast
Tue Nov 09, 2010 1:58 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Dexis/Demonstrative
Replies: 30
Views: 2317

Re: Dexis/Demonstrative

You could fly neither here nor there and you couldn't fall down so you'd never hit the ground.
by Radagast
Tue Nov 09, 2010 1:33 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Dexis/Demonstrative
Replies: 30
Views: 2317

Re: Dexis/Demonstrative

Count Iblis wrote:
Zelos wrote:Tried googling but failed.

How does Dexis and Demosntratives such as "This" "That" etc develop in a language lacking them? And what would they tend to come from=
Verbs of motion.
Can you even have verbs of motion without already having deixis? Where would you go?
by Radagast
Mon Nov 08, 2010 7:28 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Dexis/Demonstrative
Replies: 30
Views: 2317

Re: Dexis/Demonstrative

And its a cognitive ability that probably existed before the emergence of the genus homo. Tomasello argues that language did not evolve form primate vocal communication but from primate gestural communication. This would probably mean that deixis at the root of human language. As an exercise Zelos t...
by Radagast
Mon Nov 08, 2010 5:28 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Danish phonetics
Replies: 16
Views: 2003

Re: Danish phonetics

no.
by Radagast
Mon Nov 08, 2010 3:53 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Danish phonetics
Replies: 16
Views: 2003

Re: Danish phonetics

Danish high and mid high vowels sound higher than the Cardinal vowels to most english speakers I think. They did to Rory any way. There are also some tongue root action going on to make them sound higher I think.
by Radagast
Mon Nov 08, 2010 7:30 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Danish phonetics
Replies: 16
Views: 2003

Re: Danish phonetics

The thing about the Danish /ð/, is that it also influences the preceding vowel. Icelandic <með> and Danish <med> do not sound alike, because the /ð/ does something to the <e>, which I don't know the phonological name of, in Danish, which doesn't happen in Icelandic. I don't think that is accurate. ...
by Radagast
Sun Nov 07, 2010 5:11 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Danish vs. English
Replies: 39
Views: 3078

Re: Danish vs. English

I don't think it can be made up - both languages have bastardized orthographies where foreign loanwords are accepted in their original spelling. This means that there are theoretically infinite spellings for every segment in both languages. Otherwise english would win by default because it has a lar...
by Radagast
Sun Nov 07, 2010 8:26 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Danish phonetics
Replies: 16
Views: 2003

Re: Danish phonetics

I've heard other foreigners hear it as a lateral. My daughter produces a lateral for /ð/ in both Danish and Spanish. I think that the lateral sound comes from its being a lot more interdental (the tongue basically moves from an alveolar to an interdental approximant during production) and a lot more...
by Radagast
Sun Oct 10, 2010 9:11 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Pirahã recursion - new interpretation of data
Replies: 24
Views: 3385

TaylorS wrote:Methinks Everett is degenerating into quackdom of the same form as Lee Whorf.
[oblique rant] ... [/oblique rant]
by Radagast
Fri Oct 08, 2010 7:45 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Pirahã recursion - new interpretation of data
Replies: 24
Views: 3385

Mostly the conclusion that God doesn't exist. She is still a missionary trying to convert the Pirahã.
by Radagast
Sun Oct 03, 2010 9:17 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: can mute people actually talk?
Replies: 22
Views: 4478

I think I misread you as saying that people without functioning vocal chords weren't mute since they were only unable to produce voicing distinctions in stops. I wanted to add that not having functional vocal chords was a little worse than that since you also can't produce vowels. Sorry for the conf...
by Radagast
Sun Oct 03, 2010 7:50 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: can mute people actually talk?
Replies: 22
Views: 4478

No but people with damaged vocal chords would speak with unvoiced vowels which is the same as whispering so the original poster was right.
by Radagast
Sun Oct 03, 2010 7:23 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: can mute people actually talk?
Replies: 22
Views: 4478

Re: can mute people actually talk?

So, if this all correct, they should be able to speak, just in whispers... Mostly right, except that mutes usually have working vocal chords - hence someone without working vocal chords would be said to have a speech impediment, not to be mute, since they can still speak. Damaging the vocal chords ...