Search found 636 matches

by vec
Sun May 10, 2015 5:34 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Not switch reference but...
Replies: 5
Views: 1015

Re: Not switch reference but...

Yes, exactly. Your first quote is the system I'm attempting to research.
by vec
Fri May 08, 2015 6:35 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Not switch reference but...
Replies: 5
Views: 1015

Re: Not switch reference but...

No?
by vec
Fri May 08, 2015 6:29 pm
Forum: Conlangery & Conworlds
Topic: Conlang Reconstruction Game 2014: we have a forum
Replies: 97
Views: 22470

Re: Conlang Reconstruction Game 2014: we have a forum

I've added a whole lot of on Əktoś Duəmeuk's morphology to its Akana wiki page. Note you'll need to copy the address because the capital schwa breaks the internet. to http://akana.conlang.org/wiki/Əktoś_Duəmeuk
by vec
Sat May 02, 2015 9:53 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Pitch Accent and Stress Accent
Replies: 12
Views: 1677

Re: Pitch Accent and Stress Accent

Norwegian and Swedish have (mostly) initial stress and a high-low pitch system that can appear (roughly) anywhere. In Danish the high pitch has been replaced by stød which is a glottalization thingy that's a bit hard to describe.
by vec
Fri May 01, 2015 12:33 pm
Forum: Conlangery & Conworlds
Topic: How do you manage your lexicon?
Replies: 25
Views: 4351

Re: How do you manage your lexicon?

Cmd/Ctrl+F gives you search in Google Docs.
by vec
Fri May 01, 2015 12:22 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Ergative-absolutive alignment
Replies: 4
Views: 955

Re: Ergative-absolutive alignment

As far as I know, tripartite alignment does not exist for bitransitives, i.e. where the objects of a bitransitive verbs each have distinct cases from a monotransitive verb's complements.
by vec
Fri May 01, 2015 12:19 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Not switch reference but...
Replies: 5
Views: 1015

Not switch reference but...

What is it called when a language drops person marking while the verbs have the same subject?

Example:
He-sing and Ø-dance = He sings and he dances.

whereas
He-sing and he-dance = He sings and another guy dances.

Is there a term for this? Does this exist even?
by vec
Thu Dec 18, 2014 5:30 pm
Forum: Almea
Topic: A comparison of Almean languages
Replies: 5
Views: 3084

Re: A comparison of Almean languages

Somebody already figured out Old Skourene and Wede:i are related. Someone know the thread?
by vec
Sat Nov 01, 2014 5:27 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: complementary distribution
Replies: 41
Views: 3745

Re: complementary distribution

@Vecfaranti, I think there's pretty much no distinction medially anyway because <b d g> /p t k/ medially become <v ð g> /v ð γ/ except after /l n (m?)/ as far as I've noticed where they're /p t/ and <ng> is /ŋ/. The guy I've been skyping with pronounces <hlj lj> as /ʎ̝̊ ʎ/ so I kinda thought the re...
by vec
Fri Oct 31, 2014 7:31 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: complementary distribution
Replies: 41
Views: 3745

Re: complementary distribution

Yeah, my bad about <au>, kinda slipped in; I was thinking of [œʏ]. As for voiceless segments I think they're also somewhere analysed as /h+C/. The stops are a bit of a mess. Word initially, aspirates contrast with tenuis: tá /tʰau:/ 'toe', dá /tau:/ 'coma'. Intervocalically and in codas, they do no...
by vec
Wed Oct 29, 2014 9:48 am
Forum: Almea
Topic: Flaidish errata/questions
Replies: 5
Views: 2492

Re: Flaidish errata/questions

What is the rule for pronouncing vowels in open syllables? I'm having a hard time discerning it from the text. Is it according to spelling, whether written double or single, or is there more to it? As far as I can see, it only depends on whether the following consonant is written double or single, ...
by vec
Mon Oct 27, 2014 9:25 pm
Forum: Conlangery & Conworlds
Topic: Exploring the secundative
Replies: 3
Views: 1294

Re: Exploring the secundative

According to this article by Martin Haspelmath , a tripartite alignment with regards to ditransitives, is only attested in one language he could find. All languages with secundatives have identical nominatives and accusatives. In these cases, the nominative-accusative case is often termed primative....
by vec
Mon Oct 27, 2014 11:59 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: complementary distribution
Replies: 41
Views: 3745

Re: complementary distribution

Isn't it supposed to be sth. like: /p pp b bb t tt d dd k kk g gɡ/ /f v θ (ð) s ss h/ /m mm n nn ŋ/ /r rr l ll j/ /i ɪ ʏ u/ /ɛ œ ɔ/ /a/ /aɪ aʊ ɔʊ ɔʏ ɛɪ/ The allophony is sick tho Edit: added /ð/ in brackets to account for several compounds, not sure if that works but hey <Alþingi> has a medial /θ/....
by vec
Mon Oct 27, 2014 5:50 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: complementary distribution
Replies: 41
Views: 3745

Re: complementary distribution

It's interesting; almost no Icelandic grammar book lists only the minimal phoneme inventory of Icelandic. Several sounds which only occur in complimentary distribution with other sounds are always listed in Icelandic sound tables, such as the one on Wikipedia. The table seen there is half-way betwee...
by vec
Fri Oct 24, 2014 4:01 pm
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Deriving Stative Verbs
Replies: 6
Views: 966

Re: Deriving Stative Verbs

A lot of old IE languages do similar things via perfectives.
by vec
Thu Oct 23, 2014 4:30 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: complementary distribution
Replies: 41
Views: 3745

Re: complementary distribution

zompist wrote:Sure. The classic example is /h/ and /ŋ/ in English.
Are there no places where /h/ and /ŋ/ contrast? Does this mean they could be analyzed as the same phoneme?
by vec
Tue Oct 14, 2014 8:40 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The weird natlang phoneme thread
Replies: 33
Views: 4552

Re: The weird natlang phoneme thread

Oro Win, Wari’ and of course Pirahã, all from the Amazon, reportedly have a voiceless bilabially post-trilled dental stop /t͡ʙ̥/. Dafuq?
by vec
Tue Oct 14, 2014 8:22 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: /j/ to /dʒ/ in Romance
Replies: 15
Views: 3086

Re: /j/ to /dʒ/ in Romance

For some reason, /j/ and /w/ tend to be pretty stable adjacent to consonants but they can do whatever they want intervocalically.
by vec
Tue Oct 14, 2014 8:06 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Lateral affricates?
Replies: 7
Views: 1416

Re: Lateral affricates?

Wikipedia has recordings: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiceless_alveolar_lateral_affricate For the alveolar one, start by saying /l/ and sustain it, and try to make it unvoiced. For the latter, you can think of it as pronouncing a simultaneous /h/. Keep practicing the unvoiced /l/. Once you get th...
by vec
Mon Oct 13, 2014 9:44 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: Language data format
Replies: 3
Views: 706

Re: Language data format

The use of wikitables, organized horizontally from labial to glottal, vertically from stop to approximant, à la IPA, on Wikipedia, seems to be the most standardized way.
by vec
Wed Oct 08, 2014 4:21 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: /j/ to /dʒ/ in Romance
Replies: 15
Views: 3086

Re: /j/ to /dʒ/ in Romance

The Argentinian change of intervocalic /j/ > /ʃ/, which is a bit strange, fits this bill (to make up for the fact that there is a /tʃ/). FWIW, there was an intermediate stage /ʒ/. Interestingly, there was a sex-linked opposition for awhile: men said [ʒ], women said [ʃ]. But women teach the next gen...
by vec
Wed Oct 08, 2014 4:09 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: The weird natlang phoneme thread
Replies: 33
Views: 4552

Re: The weird natlang phoneme thread

Nortaneous wrote:Big Nambas has linguolabials.
Apparently, so do a few other languages. New mission. Make conlang with linguolabials. Do we have any data on how they arise?
by vec
Tue Oct 07, 2014 4:47 am
Forum: Languages & Linguistics
Topic: /j/ to /dʒ/ in Romance
Replies: 15
Views: 3086

Re: /j/ to /dʒ/ in Romance

Now that it's morning I think I can do a better job of explaining. First of all, Spanish and Portuguese went the same way, /j/ > /dʒ/ and no dialects involve any intermediaries so there is no need to assume them. This is just your basic fortition. But how does an approximant go stop, you ask? Approx...