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PostPosted: Sat Jun 11, 2005 2:10 am 
Lebom
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Hlewagastiz wrote:
Hlewagastiz wrote:
the other names (i.e. ianuarie, februarie etc.) entered Romanian via Church Slavonic (which accounts for the presence of an odd -m- in the name for October: Octombrie!).


Quoting myself, I'd like to write something about that "odd -m-" in the name for October; I think it's a very interesting case.

This "odd -m-" is present only in languages spoken by people who are mainly "Orthodox" (or other Eastern-rite) Christians. Cf. Bulgarian: oktomvri; Romanian: octombrie; Armenian: ogtomper/oktomber; Georgian: oktomberi; Russian: oktjabr' (where -ja- comes from a Slavonic nasal, thus originally "oktombrie"). The most interesting case is that of Modern Greek (which maybe the key to the "mystery"): Although the correct (and accepted) form is "Oktovrios" (i.e. without any -m-), many people say "Oktomvrios"; in Byzantine times this was also written in the latter form! This is an error made by Byzantines (and then passed into Church Slavonic), due to analogy with other month names containing -m-, i.e. Dekemvrios, Septemvrios, Noemvrios. From Byzantine "pseudo-savant" Greek it passed to Church Slavonic (and thence to other Balkan languages), Armenian and Georgian. I say "pseudo-savant" because the natural Greek pronunciation (ever since) didn't tolerated the sequence [mv]; Greeks always said [mb] or just [b] (Southern Modern Greek). Greek "savants" consider sequences such as [mv], [nδ] as more elevated :? . So, many laymen imitated them in thinking that "Oktovrios" (without -m-) was a ... rustic pronunciation (poor guys!). Bulgarian seems to have taken the word directly from Greek rather than from Church Slavonic.


Sometimes this Board offers more than a dozen etymological dictionaries can. Thanks, Hlewagastiz, I have always wondered about the reason for the -ja- in the Russian form, now I know!


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 11, 2005 2:15 am 
Lebom
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Glenn Kempf wrote:
Nikura wrote:
About "frunze"
I thought "frunze" was of slavonic origin.... or from further Cf the city "Frunze" in Tadjikistan.... maybe it's just a coincidence lol:


A correction: Frunze was the Soviet-era name for the capital of Kyrgyzstan, not Tajikistan; it was named in honor of the early Bolshevik leader Mikhail Frunze. In 1991, it was renamed Bishkek (reflecting its pre-Soviet name of Bishkek/Pishpek).

Frunze himself was born in pre-Soviet Bishkek, but was apparently an ethnic Russian;
I have no idea if his name has any relation to the month-name frunzar in Rumanian, either via Latin or Slavic derivation.)

p@,
Glenn


My boss has just gone to Bishkek on mission, he spent a week there. Fascinating place, apparently. Lots of fresh, tasty, unpretentious food.

On the weekend, he went to a nearby resort on lake Issyk Kul, which is partly fed by underwater hot springs. Despite the existence of these hot springs, the resort hotel had hot water for only a few hours every day. Good old Soviet-style know-how!


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2005 9:25 am 
Sanci
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gsandi wrote:
Sometimes this Board offers more than a dozen etymological dictionaries can. Thanks, Hlewagastiz, I have always wondered about the reason for the -ja- in the Russian form, now I know!


Thanks, gsandi. I've also written a book concerning such phenomena linking together languages spoken by people sharing common cultural features. It will be published in a few months; I'll let you know, if you're interested in such kind of linguistic relationships.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2005 9:35 am 
Sanci
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pharazon wrote:
Nikura wrote:
kolovoz (<croatian "kolovoz"... is it really from "kolo"=circle and "voz"=train ???!!)


I suspect the -voz is related to osam 'eight', although I'm not sure if the Croatian form ever had initial v- like Russian does.


Croatian didn't ever had such initial v- (like Russian, spoken Czech and other Slavonic tongues); nor could -voz be in any way related to "osam", since Slavonic [s] is never confused with Slavonic [z]; the etymology must be based on the roots Nikura mentioned, but the meaning couldn't be this, of course...

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2008 8:03 am 
Lebom
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If anyone is interested, here you can compare names of months and days of the week in various Slavic languages. The days of the week are given like this: 1 - Sunday, 2 - Monday etc. The native names of the languages are used rather than the English ones: język polski - Polish, kaszëbsczi jãzëk - Kashubian, čeština - Czech, slovenčina - Slovak, hornjoserbšćina - Upper Sorbian, dolnoserbšćina - Lower Sorbian, русский язык - Russian, укрaїнська мова - Ukrainian, беларуская мова - Belarusian, slovenščina - Slovene, hrvatski jezik - Croatian, српски језик - Serbian, македонски јазик - Macedonian, български език - Bulgarian, slověnьskъ ęzykъ - Old Church Slavonic (Roman translit.).

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 5:54 am 
Smeric
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Sorry for bringing up a thread this old, but I just discovered it and it's interesting.
gach wrote:
Nikura wrote:
Finnish
tammikuu, helmikuu, maaliskuu, huhtikuu, toukokuu, kes?kuu, hein?kuu, elokuu, syyskuu, lokakuu, marraskuu, joulukuu


I see these are in need of some ethymologies. As with the S?mi months the Finnish month names all end with the word kuu, "moon", that's also commonly used as a shorter form of kuukausi, "month", in speech. The initial parts are:
tammi = "oak"
helmi = "pearl", propably referring to the shining snow of late winter time
maalis, not found as an independent word and I'm not aware of it's ethymology
huhti, same as above
touko, as older word for spring that isn't found independently, other that the month's name it's preserved in the compound toukoty?t, "spring time works at the field", and perhaps in some dialects
kes? = "summer"
hein? = "hay"
elo = "harvest", the word is actually derived from the verb el??, to live, with the more regular meaning "living"
syys, a compound form of the word syksy, "autumn"
loka = "mud"
marras, an older word for a certain kind of death
joulu = "Christmas"

I've heard that tammi used to mean something like navel or center, and january is called that because it's in the middle of winter. It's interesting that tammi nowadays means oak, because in many cultures (including the Finnish I think) they believed that there was a gigantic tree in the middle of the world. Helmi also means bead. It refers to the ice drops that are formed on tree branches when snow melt and then freeze again.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 7:34 am 
Avisaru
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gach wrote:
Nikura wrote:
Finnish
tammikuu, helmikuu, maaliskuu, huhtikuu, toukokuu, kesäkuu, heinäkuu, elokuu, syyskuu, lokakuu, marraskuu, joulukuu


I see these are in need of some ethymologies.

Let's finish the job then.
Quote:
tammi = "oak"

And in the context here, it's common to evoke the older sense of the word, "central hub" (cf. dialectal/arcaic sydänkuu, "heart-"); i.e. midwinter.
Quote:
maalis, not found as an independent word and I'm not aware of it's ethymology

Usually connected to maa "earth, ground, land, country etc.", as being the month when land is exposed for the first time. The morphology is a little off as you'd expect maallis- for "earthy" (ModF usually: "worldly")
Quote:
huhti, same as above

The compounding form of huhta, a type of slash-&-burn field traditionally burnt around April.

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PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2012 11:44 am 
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Dutch has its own names for the months too.

Louwmaand / Looimaand (January) : from the activity of leer looien (to tan leather), that was mostly done in January
Sprokkelmaand (February) : from the Roman purification feast the spurcalia, that was celebrated in February. The name changed by the influence of the Dutch verb sprokkelen (to gather wood or to collect)
Lentemaand (March) : The beginning of the spring
Grasmaand (April) : The month in which new grass begins to grow
Bloeimaand (May) : the bloom month
Zomermaand (June) : The month in which the summer begins
Hooimaand (July) : The month in which the hay-making is done
Oogstmaand (August) : The month in which the harvest is done (The Dutch word 'oogst' (harvest) has been derived from the Latin word Augustus)
Herfstmaand (September) : The month in which the autumn begins
Wijnmaand (October) : The month which wine is made
Slachtmaand (November) : The month in which animals are slaughtered
Wintermaand (December) : The month in which the winter begins


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PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 8:56 am 
Smeric
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Why do I see this thread only now?

Hlewagastiz wrote:
Russian: oktjabr' (where -ja- comes from a Slavonic nasal, thus originally "oktombrie").
Russian -ja- goes back to the Slavic front nasal, so the form mus have been *oktembr-.


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PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2012 3:16 pm 
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shouldn't this be NON latin names of the month?

I thought someone had decided months didn't deserve names anymore

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PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 8:20 am 
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Duaseron wrote:
Augustmonth (August)

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PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 2:21 pm 
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Nowadays Georgian has latin-based month names:
იანვარი ianvari
თებერვალი tebervali
მარტი marṭi
აპრილი aṗrili
მაისი maisi
ივნისი ivnisi
ივლისი ivlisi
აგვისტო agvisṭo
სექტემბერი sekṭemberi
ოქტომბერი okṭomberi
ნოემბერი noemberi
დეკემბერი deḳemberi

I'm not sure why February begins with /tʰ/... I can only guess that it might have been a hypercorrection when (I assumed it was) originally borrowed from Russian, since Greek /tʰ ~ θ/ is often borrowed as /f/ into that language.

There's also an old set of names, which are really cool:

Jan: აპნისი / აპანი aṗnisi / aṗani
Feb: სურწყუნისი surc̣qunisi
Mar: მირკანი mirḳani
Apr: იგრიკა igriḳa
May: ვარდობისთვე vardobistve "Month of the Rose Season"
June: თიბათვე / ივანობისთვე tibatve / ivanobistve "Month of Mowing / Month of the Feastday of St. John"
July: მკათათვე mḳatatve "Month of Harvests"
Aug: მარიამობისთვე mariamobistve "Month of the Feastday of the Virgin Mary"
Sep: (ახალწლისა) ენკენისთვე (axalc̣lisa) enḳenistve (the first word means "new-year-GEN"; the second word doesn't seem to have a transparent etymology but ends in tve "month")
Oct: ღვინობისთვე ğvinobistve "Month of Wine Production"
Nov: გიორგობისთვე giorgobistve "Month of the Feastday of St George"
Dec: ქრისტეშობისთვე krisṭešobistve "Month of Christmas"


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PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2012 8:39 pm 
Avisaru
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How about the months in the Agawam calendar? These month names (taken down, probably in 1645, by William Pynchon, an English trader living in Springfield Massachusetts) are the only attestation of the language, and (aside from some untranslated place names and a "Loup A" (=Nipmuck?) manuscript) one of the only attestations of any of the original languages of the Connecticut River valley:

William Pynchon wrote:
1. Squannikesos-- When they set Indian corne (pt of Aprill & pt of May)
2. moonesquan nimockkesos-- when women weed theire corne (pt of May & pt of June)
3. Towwakesos-- when they hill Ind corne (pt of June & pt of July)
4. matterl lawawkesos-- when squashes are ripe & Ind beans begin to be eatable
micheeneekesos-- when Ind corne is eatable
6. pah[?]quitaqunkkesos-- ye middle between harvest & eating Ind corne
7. pepewarr-- bec: of white frost on ye grass & grain
8. qunnikesos
9. papsapquoho, about ye 6.th day of January or, Lowatannassick: So caled bec: they account it ye middle of winter.
10. Squo chee kesos-- bec ye sun hath strength to thaw
11. Wapicummilcom-- bec ye ice in ye river is all gone (pt of February & pt of March)
12. Namassack kesos-- because of catching fish (pt of March & pt of Aprill

The Algonquianist Gordon Day provided a tentative analysis of the names, based on cognates in other Algonquian languages. The "kesos" element is obviously the word for "moon"/"month", and probably represents something like *[ki:so(h)s] or the like (cf. Abenaki gizos).

"Squannikesos" probably means "Spring's moon" (probably something like */s(i)kwanikisos/)
"moonesquan nimockkesos" probably means "weeding moon" (probably something like */monəskənəmək/)
"Towwakesos" may means "hilling corn moon"
"matterl lawawkesos" may mean "mature flowers moon" (cf. Abenaki matahtawal gizos)
"micheeneekesos" probably means "eating's moon" (something like */miʧinikisos/)
"pah[?]quitaqunkkesos" probably means "early Fall moon" (probably something like */pahkwitakwɔ̃k(o)kisos/, cf. Abenaki pohkwidagwôgoo gizos)
"pepewarr" may mean "there is white frost" (cf. Massachusett <toohpuwudt>)
"qunnikesos" means "long moon" (probably something like */kwənikisos/)
"papsapquoho" means "he [winter] half-passes" (probably */pap(a)sɔ̃pkwa(h)o/, cf. Abenaki babassôpkwao)
"Lowatannassick" may mean "where it is middle winter" (probably something like */lɔ̃wəhpənasik/, cf. Abenaki nôwihponassik)
"Squo chee kesos" may mean "ice honeycombs moon" (cf. Abenaki tokskwacit gizos)
"Wapicummilcom" may be part of a longer phrase, akin to Abenaki mat ohpihkamalkino, meaning "not stepping on it [i.e., the ice, because it's no longer thick enough to walk on]"
"Namassack kesos" means "fishes moon" (probably */namasak kisos/)


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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 3:34 pm 
Sanno
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Here are the month names used in revived Kanza (a Dhegiha Siouan language).

miⁿok’aⁿ yíⁿge "month for nothing"
míⁿk’ozhi "not useful"
hoⁿba oscéje "long days"
wábe "planting time"
wawék’acbe "month for acting or working"
cedóⁿga maⁿnaⁿghabe "month when buffalo rut"
cedóⁿga kúyughabe "month when buffalo mate"
ta he baxóⁿbe "month when deer shed horns"
ophaⁿ kúyughabe "month when elks mate"
ta kúyughabe "month when deer mate"
óphaⁿ zhodabe "months when elks puff/snort"
wasábe zhodabe "months when bears puff/snort"

The month names Laflesche lists for Osage (a close living relative of Kanza) are quite similar, but Quintero states in her dictionary that they weren't in use among the remaining native speakers she interviewed.


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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 4:58 pm 
Sumerul
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Lakota:

wiótheȟika wí wí-o-theȟí=kA | luminary-LOC-terrible=ATTN "month when the sun is hard to find"

čhaŋnápȟopa wí čháŋ-na-pȟópA | tree-by.inner.force-X.is.burst.open.with.a.cracking.sound "month when trees burst open (because of ice expanding within them)"
thiyóȟeyuŋka wí thí-o-ȟeyúŋkA | house-LOC-hoarfrost "month when hoarfrost gets indoors"

ištáwičhayazaŋ wí ištá-wičha-yazáŋ | eye-3.COL-body.part.hurts "month when people's eyes hurt (from the sun being low in the sky and reflecting off melting snow)"

pȟežítȟo wí pȟeží-tȟó | grass-green "green grass month"
maǧáksiča aglí wí maǧá-ksičA a-glí | goose-? 3.COL-return.VEN.PRF "month when ducks get back here"
wihákakta čhépapi wí wi-hakákta čhépA=pi | woman-X.is.youngest.born be.fat=ANI.PL "month when the youngest daughters are fat (I have no idea what this is about)"

čhaŋwápetȟo wí čháŋ-apé-tȟó | tree-leaf-green "month of green tree leaves"
čhaŋwápenableča wí čháŋ-apé-na-bléčA | tree-leaf-by.inner.force-X.bursts.into.pieces "month of blossoming tree leaves"

thíŋpsiŋla itkáȟča wí thíŋta-psíŋ=la itká-ȟčá | prairie-rice=DIM its.egg-X.blossoms "month of blossoming wild turnip seeds"
wipázukȟawašte wí wípazukȟa-wašté | juneberry-good "month of good juneberries"
wakíčhepa wí wa-ki-čhépA | DETR-become.again-fat "month of things getting fat again"

čhaŋpȟásapa wí čháŋ-pȟá-sápA | tree-head-dark "month of dark treetops"
wazíškeča wí wazíškeča | wild.strawberry "month of wild strawberries"

kȟáŋtaša wí kȟáŋta-šá | plum-red "month of ripe plums"
wasútȟuŋ wí wa-sú-tȟúŋ | DETR-seed-bear "month of things bearing fruit/seed"

čhaŋwápeǧi wí čháŋ-apé-ǧí | tree-leaf-brown "month of brown tree leaves"

čhaŋwápekasna wí čháŋ-apé-ka-sna | tree-leaf-by.natural.forces-small.things.fall.from.their.hold "month when tree leaves are knocked off by the wind"

tȟakhíyuȟa wí tȟa-khi-yuȟá | ruminant-in.contact-hold "bull month" (more literally: "month when (male) ruminants grab and hold (females) close")
waníyetu wí waní-etu | winter-V.IMPS.SPAT "winter month"

tȟahékapšuŋ wí tȟa-hé-ka-pšúŋ | ruminant-horn-by.hitting-hard.object.is.uprooted "month of deer shedding their horns"
waníčhoka wí waní-čhó=ka | winter-core=ATTN "midwinter month"


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 6:28 am 
Niš
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German also has some older names for the months, which mainly where reconstructed in the 19th century

Hartmond
Hornung
Lenzmonat
Ostermond
Wonnemond
Brachmond
Heumond
Erntemond
Herbstmond
Weinmond
Nebelmonat: translation of french "brumaire"
Wintermond

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 11:00 pm 
Sanci
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And then there are the Polynesian month names:

eg

http://www.jps.auckland.ac.nz/document/ ... 228-240/p1

http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarl ... d1-d2.html


http://www.kapotrading.com/Hawaiian_Calendar.html

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:57 am 
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There are many traditional names for the months in Japan. Most of them refer either to weather such as wind, snow, or frost, or plants, especially flowers, budding trees, and fall colours. Here is a list:

January:
睦月 Mutsuki
霞初月 Kasumisomezuki
暮新月 Kureshizuki
早緑月 Samidorizuki
太郎月 Tarōzuki
年端月・年初月 Toshihazuki
子日月 Nenobizuki
初空月 Hatsusorazuki
初春月 Hatsuharuzuki
初見月 Hatsumitsuki
祝月 Iwaizuki
正月 Shōgatsu
新春 Shinshun
端月 Tangetsu
孟春 Mōshun

February:
如月 Kisaragi
梅月 Umetsuki
梅見月 Umemitsuki / Umemizuki
小草生月 Ogusaoizuki
雁帰月 Karikaerizuki
木芽月 Konometsuki
早緑月 Samidorizuki
初花月 Hatsuhanatsuki
雪消月 Yukigiezuki / Yukigezuki
花春 Kashun
仲春 Chūshun
仲陽 Chūyō
令月 Reigetsu

March:
弥生 Yayoi
桜月 Sakuratsuki / Sakurazuki
早花咲月 Sahanasazuki
染色月 Shimeirozuki
花津月 Hanatsutsuki
花見月 Hanamitsuki / Hanamizuki
春惜月 Haruoshimizuki
雛月 Hiinatsuki
夢見月 Yumemizuki
嘉月 Kagetsu
季春 Kishun
晩春 Kurenoharu / Banshun
暮春 Boshun

April:
卯月 Uzuki
卯花月 Unohanatsuki / Unohanazuki
得鳥羽月 Edorihazuki
鳥来月 Torikutsuki
鳥待月 Torimachitsuki
夏初月 Natsuhatsuki
花残月 Hananokorizuki
孟夏 Mōka
麦秋 Mugiaki / Bakushū
初夏 Shoka
首夏 Shuka
畏月 Igetsu

May:
皐月 Satsuki
菖蒲月 Ayametsuki / Ayamezuki
五色月 Itsuirozuki
狭雲月 Sakumozuki
早苗月 Sanaezuki
五月雨月 Samidaretsuki
多草月 Takusazuki
田草月 Tagusazuki
橘月 Tachibanatsuki
雨月 Uzuki
鶉月 Jungetsu
仲夏 Chūka
梅夏 Baika
梅月 Baigetsu

June:
水無月 Minazuki / Minatsuki
弥涼暮月 Isuzukurezuki
風待月 Kazemachizuki
涼暮月 Suzukurezuki
蝉羽月 Seminohatsuki
田無月 Tanashizuki
常夏月 Tokonatsuzuki
鳴神月 Narukamitsuki / Narukamizuki
松風月 Matsukazezuki
季夏 Kika
涸月 Kogetsu
暑月 Shogetsu
晩夏 Banka
林鐘 Rinshō

July
文月 Fumitsuki / Fumizuki / Fuzuki
相月 Aizuki
秋初月 Akisometsuki
女郎花月 Ominaeshitsuki
七夕月 Tanabatatsuki
親月 Fuzuki
文披月 Fumihirazuki
書披月 Fumihirogezuki
愛合月 Medeaizuki
新秋 Shinshū
初秋 Hatsuaki / Shoshū
孟秋 Mōshū
涼月 Ryōgetsu

August:
葉月 Hazuki / Hatsuki
秋風月 Akikazetsuki
雁来月 Karikizuki
草津月 Kusatsuzuki
紅染月 Kōmetsuki
木染月 Kozometsuki
月見月 Tsukimizuki
燕去月 Tsubamesarizuki
桂月 Keigetsu
盛秋 Seishū
清秋 Seishū
仲秋 Chūshū
萩月 Hagutsuki

September:
長月 Nagatsuki / Nagazuki
色どり月 Irodorizuki
小田刈月 Odakarizuki
菊咲月 Kikusazuki
菊月 Kikuzuki
寝覚月 Nezamezuki
紅葉月 Momijitsuki
季秋 Kishū
晩秋 Kurenoaki / Banshū
暮秋 Boshū

October:
神無月 Kannazuki*
神有月・神在月 Kamiarizuki*
神去月 Kamisarizuki
時雨月 Shiguretsuki / Shigurezuki
初霜月 Hatsushimotsuki / Hatsushimozuki
玄冬 Gentō
小春 Koharu
初冬 Shotō
上冬 Jōtō
孟冬 Mōtō
陽月 Yōgetsu

*'Kannazuki/Kamisarizuki' means the month when the gods are gone. However, in the Izumo area, 'Kamiarizuki' ('the month when there are gods') is used instead, because it is Izumo where all the gods gather when the leave other regions.

November:
霜月 Shimotsuki
神楽月 Kaguratsuki
神帰月 Kamikizuki
霜降月 Shimofurizuki
露ごもりの葉月 Tsuyugomorinohazuki
雪待月 Yukimachizuki
雪見月 Yukimizuki
広寒月 Kōkangetsu
霜月 Sōgetsu
仲冬 Chūtō
子月 Nezuki

December:
師走 Shiwasu / Shihasu
梅初月 Umehatsuzuki
弟月 Otozuki
親子月 Oyakozuki
限月 Kagirinotsuki
暮来月 ・暮れ古月 Kurekotsuki / Kurekozuki
年積月 Toshitsumitsuki
春待月 Harumachizuki
三冬月 Mifuyuzuki
季冬 Kitō
極月 Gokugetsu
晩冬 Bantō
余月 Yogetsu
臘月 Rōgetsu


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 4:44 pm 
Sanci
Sanci

Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2012 7:59 pm
Posts: 17
Location: GMT -8
Yupik's names for months have quaint translations.

Nunivak Yupik

Tanqiluryak Kinguqliq / second cold month
Kuiget Aanit / mother of rivers
Taqukat Tanqiat / seals’ month
Tengaurtet Tanqiat / kittiwakes’ month
Tengmiaret Tanqiat / birds’ month
Tengmiaret Irnitiit / birds give birth
Alpairusvik / murres’ departure time
Qilangaarusvik / puffins’ departure time
Kakeggliyarvik / runny nose time
Nanvat Cikutiit / ponds freeze
Imam Umgutii / sea closes in
Tanqiluryak Ciuqliq / first cold month

Bristol Bay Yupik

Iralull’er / bad month
Kanruyauciq / frost
Kepnerciq / cutting time
Tengmiirvik / geese come
Kayangut Anutiit / coming of eggs
Kaugun / hitting (of fish)
Ingun / molting (of birds)
Tengun / flight (of birds)
Amirairvik / (caribou) shed velvet
Qaariitaarvik / masked festivals
Cauyarvik / time of drumming
Uivik / time of going around

Yukon Yupik

Iralull'eq / bad month
Nayirciraruaq / seals mate
Nayirciq / baby seals
Maklagaq / baby bearded seal
Irniviat Tengmiat / birds have young
Cupvik / break-up
Taryaqviit / king salmon
Nurarcurvik / time to hunt calves
Amirairviat Tuntut / caribou shedding time
Uksurvik / winter time
Qaariitaarvik / masked festivals
Cauyarvik / time of drumming

It's curious how October and November in Bristol Bay became November and December in Yukon.

(Other dialects have generally cognate names.)


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 5:21 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
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Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2003 1:48 pm
Posts: 1128
Location: Litareng, Keynami
I added the English translations in bold (though I've not checked the names myself):

Chartophylacium wrote:
Hartmond 'Winter moon' according to my dictionary
Hornung Bastard; basically "go-short moon" because it's the shortest month
Lenzmonat Spring month
Ostermond Easter moon
Wonnemond Bliss moon
Brachmond Ploughing moon
Heumond Hay moon
Erntemond Harvest moon
Herbstmond Autumn moon
Weinmond Wine moon
Nebelmonat Fog month
Wintermond Winter moon


Modern German takes its month names (boringly) from Latin, like everyone else: Januar/Jänner (e.g. in Austria), Februar, März, April, Mai, Juni, Juli, August, September, Oktober, November, Dezember.

(In case anyone wonders why so many posts on page 1 contain question marks—this is from when the board finally converted to utf-8 some years ago and the encoding of accented/special characters from iso-8859-1 times got fucked up.)


Last edited by Jipí on Fri Jun 22, 2012 2:35 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 6:48 pm 
Avisaru
Avisaru
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Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2003 10:42 am
Posts: 639
Location: Reykjavík, Iceland
The Nordic calendar had 5-6 months per season and does not match up with the Gregorian one, but here are the old Nordic names from Iceland and Denmark:

Icelandic
Winter (vetur): gormánuður, ýlir, mörsugur, þorri, góa, einmánuður
Sumer (sumar): harpa, skerpla, sólmánuður, heyannir, tvímánuður, haustmánuður

Danish
Winter (vinter): slagtemåned, julemåned, glugmåned, blidemåned, tordmåned, fåremåned
Summer (sommer): vårmåned, skærsommer, ormemåned, høstmåned, fiskemåned, sædemåned

_________________
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 21, 2012 7:04 pm 
Sumerul
Sumerul

Joined: Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:38 am
Posts: 2974
Location: Israel
Lyktorna wrote:
Tanqiluryak Kinguqliq / second cold month
...
Tanqiluryak Ciuqliq / first cold month
They live in Alaska yet they only have two "cold" months? xD


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2012 7:20 am 
Avisaru
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Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 12:45 pm
Posts: 702
Location: Hole of Aspiration
Chartophylacium wrote:
German also has some older names for the months, which mainly where reconstructed in the 19th century

Hartmond
Hornung
Lenzmonat
Ostermond
Wonnemond
Brachmond
Heumond
Erntemond
Herbstmond
Weinmond
Nebelmonat: translation of french "brumaire"
Wintermond

This is interesting -- I had never heard of these before. Were they pretty much just an invention of Romantic poets, or have they had any use historically among people with real jobs?


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 22, 2012 4:34 pm 
Smeric
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Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2003 1:48 pm
Posts: 1128
Location: Litareng, Keynami
Pthug wrote:
This is interesting -- I had never heard of these before.

I've never heard of them either.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2012 10:01 am 
Smeric
Smeric

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 2:49 am
Posts: 2316
Location: Bonn, Germany
Pthug wrote:
This is interesting -- I had never heard of these before. Were they pretty much just an invention of Romantic poets, or have they had any use historically among people with real jobs?

These German month names are found, on and off, in sources since the 9th century. As this site says:
Quote:
Eine einheitliche deutsche Monatsnamenreihe kann es überhaupt nicht geben, zumal allein in den verschiedenen deutschen Mundarten an die 200 unterschiedliche Monatsnamen zeitlich und/oder örtlich begrenzt vorkamen oder vorkommen, worüber zum Beispiel die Arbeit des bedeutenden Germanisten Prof. Dr. Karl Weinhold "Die deutschen Monatsnamen" (Halle 1861) Auskunft gibt.
"A unitary list of German names of the months cannot exist at all, as just in the several German dialects about 200 different names of the months occur or occurred, limited geographically or by time-period, information about which is given e.g. in the work "Die deutschen Monatsnamen" (Halle 1861) by the noted Germanist Prof. Dr. Karl Weinhold."

Weinhold's work can be found at wikimedia. A cursory reading shows that indeed there existed differing lists, depending on region and time period; in most cases these lists also mixed names of Latin and German origin. So the unified lists with only German names are best to be seen as attempts by Romantic writers and propagandists to "cleanse" German of "foreign intrusive elements" - attempts that were popular in certain circles from the 18th until the early 20th century. On the other hand, the regional lists and names seem to have indeed been in use by the wider population of the specific regions.

EDIT: The only place you come across these names in contemporary German outside of specialist literature and historical novels is crossword puzzles.


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