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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 10:40 pm 
Avisaru
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Yeah EI, I've often wished for words like that as well, particularly a nominal form of "serious". The best I can think of is "seriosity"by analogy of "curious" -> "curiosity".

Haven't you ever heard "seriousness" used before?


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 10:45 pm 
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I'm not speaking for him, but I hate the -ness suffix. It makes stuff seem awkward.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2007 11:21 pm 
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I'm not speaking for him, but I hate the -ness suffix. It makes stuff seem awkward.


Yeah, that's pretty much it. Also, I thought the -ness suffix only occurred on nouns of native or near native origin rather than those from Latin.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2007 1:27 pm 
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Eccentric Iconoclast wrote:
I wish English had a word for "ridiculousness" that didn't sound painfully awkward. My brain has gone and invented one out of the blue (ridiculum), but I imagine that sounds silly to everyone but me.
I've heard "ridiculosity" and "sensuosity". But the author who said them was going for ridiculosity in the first place.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 8:22 pm 
Avisaru
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I'm not speaking for him, but I hate the -ness suffix. It makes stuff seem awkward.

Well, I don't mind it. It helps create abstract nouns for words such as "seriousness" where a word with the desired meaning doesn't already exist. It's very usefull.

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Yeah, that's pretty much it. Also, I thought the -ness suffix only occurred on nouns of native or near native origin rather than those from Latin.

You must remember that the average person isn't a walking etymological dictionary that can tell the difference 'tween latin words and english words, as obvious as it is most of the time. Every word is a native word to them. And if -ness is a productive suffix like it is where I am, why shouldn't they use it to help create abstract nouns?

I do concede thoe that I would preffer "seriosity" over "seriousness" 'cuz I'd preffer english suffixes stick with english nouns, while latin suffixes stick with latin nouns, but I'm just a single person in the english-speaking world. If I want to convey an idea, I use the word that is most likely to relay that concept. If you google for "seriousness" and "seriosity", you'll see that "seriousness" overwhelmingly has more hits than the other. 12,100,000 vs 96,400. Thus, assuming that google hits are a reasonable counter of usage statistics, more people would be more familiar with the meaning of "seriousness" than "seriosity".


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 12:26 am 
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FinalZero wrote:
Quote:
Yeah EI, I've often wished for words like that as well, particularly a nominal form of "serious". The best I can think of is "seriosity"by analogy of "curious" -> "curiosity".

Haven't you ever heard "seriousness" used before?

Or how about gravity? He was unaware of the gravity of his situation.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2007 10:15 pm 
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Or how about gravity? He was unaware of the gravity of his situation.

That works too, but also has to compete with the more common meaning of itself.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 1:37 am 
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Eddy wrote:
Yeah EI, I've often wished for words like that as well, particularly a nominal form of "serious". The best I can think of is "seriosity"by analogy of "curious" -> "curiosity".


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2007 11:24 am 
Avisaru
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English has a possesive pronoun for people-whose- but none for things, so we must say, "The skyscraper whose windows are blue." Maybe it could be something like, "The skyscraper whiches windows are blue."


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2007 12:30 pm 
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dhokarena56 wrote:
English has a possesive pronoun for people-whose- but none for things, so we must say, "The skyscraper whose windows are blue." Maybe it could be something like, "The skyscraper whiches windows are blue."


The skyscraper which the windows of are blue, mayhaps?

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2007 1:26 pm 
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I think I've heard it this way before: "The skyscraper that's windows are blue."

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2007 2:34 pm 
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Or just "the skyscraper that has blue windows." (Sounds the most natural to me...maybe I don't need an inanimate version of whose if I would never use it :) )


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 9:45 pm 
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Gremlins wrote:
dhokarena56 wrote:
English has a possesive pronoun for people-whose- but none for things, so we must say, "The skyscraper whose windows are blue." Maybe it could be something like, "The skyscraper whiches windows are blue."

The skyscraper which the windows of are blue, mayhaps?

Ugh, stylistic nightmare. If it were indefinite, I could say, "A skyscraper the windows of which are blue" but oddly this doesn't seem to work with "The skyscraper the windows...". So "The skyscraper with the blue windows" it is.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 5:23 am 
Sanci
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What's with all the mythology? "...whose windows are blue" is fine.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2007 3:17 pm 
Avisaru
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Nuntarin wrote:
What's with all the mythology? "...whose windows are blue" is fine.
I agree.
Not as common, but "...which's windows are blue" also occurs and is also fine.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 11:27 am 
Niš
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Quote:
English has a possesive pronoun for people-whose- but none for things, so we must say, "The skyscraper whose windows are blue." Maybe it could be something like, "The skyscraper whiches windows are blue.


For several years, I've been using "the skyscraper which windows are blue", and I believe a lot of other Polish speakers do so, as more-or-less of an improper calque.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 11:32 am 
Lebom
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Quite often I hear things like this constructed "the skyscraper of which the windows are blue".


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 12:27 pm 
Avisaru
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Prmysl wrote:
Quite often I hear things like this constructed "the skyscraper of which the windows are blue".


While that's grammatical, it sounds a bit more natural to say the skyscraper the windows of which are blue. To me, at least.

Actually, I just use "whose" most of the time.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 12:57 pm 
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I miss a verb like the Norwegian å grue seg :?

It means something like "to be nervous (and think a lot) about something that is going to happen in the future to oneself" :P It's a verb which is used a lot! (at least when in school. You know - tests :roll: )

And of course the "Saudade" is a highly unique and incredible word :D


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2007 12:20 pm 
Sanci
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"The skyscraper with blue windows"? In writing I would maybe say "the skyscraper, the windows of which are blue", but I've never heard "that's" or "which" used in such a sentence. "Whose", yes, but I don't think it sounds right.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 10:49 pm 
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"The skyscraper which has blue windows." Or you could be all Pirate-y and say "The skyscraper what has blue windows."

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 27, 2007 10:54 pm 
Niš
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Aleco wrote:
I miss a verb like the Norwegian å grue seg :?

It means something like "to be nervous (and think a lot) about something that is going to happen in the future to oneself" :P It's a verb which is used a lot! (at least when in school. You know - tests :roll: )


"Worry".


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 12:51 pm 
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I like the Spanish word ganas, meaning 'desire to do something', like a noun for 'want-to'.

'No tengo ganas' basically means 'I don't want to do it', but I like using the noun without sounding all hoity-toity like 'I have no desire to do it.'

Get some ganas!

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 3:40 pm 
Sanci
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"Get some ganas" sounds kinda like "Grow some balls".... ^_^;;; .

My Span teacher in high school explained "ganar" as "to have a strong desire to do/passion for something." I like this word, too :) .

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2007 4:43 pm 
Smeric
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Wycoval wrote:
I like the Spanish word ganas, meaning 'desire to do something', like a noun for 'want-to'.

'No tengo ganas' basically means 'I don't want to do it', but I like using the noun without sounding all hoity-toity like 'I have no desire to do it.'

Get some ganas!

The same in Catalan: Tenir ganes de (Ct.) = Tener ganas de (Sp.)

And gana, in Catalan, means "hungry".

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