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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 1:33 am 
Lebom
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-Klaivas- wrote:
Nadreck wrote:
Also, why does English have "starve" = to die of hunger, but no word for to die of thirst?
"Starve to death" is to "starve" is to "be hungry" as "die of dehydration" is to "dehydrate" is to "be thirsty".


Starve may often be used idiomatically or figuratively, but it still has a connotation (if not implication) of resulting in death. Dehydrate simply doesn't have the same emphasis. To me, it just means to be in need of water, not at the risk of death necessarily.

Maybe it's because dehydrate is often used passively.

They starved as opposed to They were dehydrated.

Then again, making both active still doesn't give dehydration the same ring of death.

They starved versus The heat dehydrated them.

The first, at least to me, still implies death, while the second doesn't, just a crisis.

EDIT: I wish there was a word for this feeling I get where you feel lost, but at the same time know exactly where you are (and I don't mean disillusionment or any thing like that; it's a good feeling and I mean the lost-ish-ness literally). It's like dazzled but with a dash of overwelmed at the same time.

Dazzle-welmed?

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 7:16 am 
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Emma wrote:
Qwynegold wrote:
Emma wrote:
Nectar? It's not a common word in English, and in fact here in England, at least, no-one really drinks it, but you can buy it at Lidl.

No, it's not nectar. Ew! I once accidentally bought pear nectar at Lidl in the belief that it was pear juice. It was disgusting.

Hmm, Wikipedia tells me that saft is made by boiling water, fruit or berries and sugar, while juice is made by squeezing it out from fruits, vegetables or berries. So the real difference is in how they are made, but generally (IMO) saft is most often made from berries while juice tends to be made out of fruit.


Haha, I looove Lidl's pear and peach nectars! Although I do like tonnes of sugar in everything.

That's odd about juice and saft being different things. Whenever I've bought German orange juice it's called 'Orangensaft', though. Or is it just maybe that we call both juice and Germans call both saft and other languages might distinguish more? Hmm.

Hmm, now that I come to think of it, the Germans seem to be calling anything "saft". There's this vitamin drink or whatever that's called Blotsaft (meaning blood juice, :o because it has such a dark red color). Anyone who knows German who can explain?

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 9:35 am 
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Shouldn't it be called Blutsaft then? I'm more or less fluent in German, but not much of a juice-expert really.

But I was wondering if there was a word like the German Fingerspitzengefuhl? It more or less means 'a feeling in the fingertips'. But I don't know how to explain it.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:46 am 
Niš
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I wish English would have a word for the macedonian Претркување or in slang Тицање. It is when you're driving and you go infront of of another car. I don't remember hearing that word in english


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 11:14 am 
Lebom
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It's interesting that English has the word Slav 'member of a Slavic nation/tribe' but apparently there isn't any single word for a 'Germanic person', is there?


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 1:04 pm 
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Apiya wrote:
I wish English would have a word for the macedonian Претркување or in slang Тицање. It is when you're driving and you go infront of of another car. I don't remember hearing that word in english


to cut (someone) off...that's what's used around here, I don't know about other regions, but I imagine it's fairly widespread.

Piotr wrote:
It's interesting that English has the word Slav 'member of a Slavic nation/tribe' but apparently there isn't any single word for a 'Germanic person', is there?


I've heard teuton (adj. teutonic) used, but I don't know if it really has that meaning of "member of _____ tribe" If there's one of these that I truly haven't heard, it would actually be the Romance family... :?


Last edited by Rui on Tue Jan 22, 2008 5:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 4:19 pm 
Niš
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Emma wrote:
That's odd about juice and saft being different things.


For me it’s odd to hear that juice and saft are not different in English. In Serbian, juice is the refreshing drink made of some sort of fruit or something similar (e.g. orange juice, coca-cola, apple juice etc.) and saft is sauce that is consumed with some kind of food! :o


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 9:08 pm 
Sanno
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Qwynegold wrote:
There's this vitamin drink or whatever that's called Blotsaft (meaning blood juice, :o because it has such a dark red color). Anyone who knows German who can explain?

All the Ghits I find for "Blotsaft" or "Blutsaft" are in Swedish, so I'll let one of our resident Scandinavians explain.

Chibi wrote:
If there's one of these that I truly haven't heard, it would actually be the Romance family.

"Welsche"!

Punkygelado wrote:
But I was wondering if there was a word like the German Fingerspitzengefuhl? It more or less means 'a feeling in the fingertips'. But I don't know how to explain it.

There are several, depending on the context. (Remember, words don't have translations; utterances do.) "Tact", "instinct", "flair", and "feeling" all come to mind.

zlatiborica wrote:
In Serbian, juice is the refreshing drink made of some sort of fruit or something similar (e.g. orange juice, coca-cola, apple juice etc.) and saft is sauce that is consumed with some kind of food!

If the latter is made from cooked fruit, "compote" might be appropriate. "Chutney" would describe chunkier condiments. Those made with chiefly uncooked fruit may be called "salsa".


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:10 pm 
Lebom
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Chibi wrote:
Apiya wrote:
I wish English would have a word for the macedonian Претркување or in slang Тицање. It is when you're driving and you go infront of of another car. I don't remember hearing that word in english


to cut (someone) off...that's what's used around here, I don't know about other regions, but I imagine it's fairly widespread.


Also to shun and to exile, although both (especially the latter) have stronger implications than to cut off.

And, though you beat me to mentioning Teuton, it doesn't specifically mean of Germanic descent (at least AFAIK). It just means of ___ tribe although the various Germanic place/people names derived from it (Dutch, Deutsh) certainly give it a very Germanic feel.

That and it reeks of post-WWII terminology.

linguoboy wrote:
If the latter is made from cooked fruit, "compote" might be appropriate. "Chutney" would describe chunkier condiments. Those made with chiefly uncooked fruit may be called "salsa".

IMD, compote is more of a catch-all, while the distinction between chutney and salsa is the viscosity and fluidity of the sauce (chutney having visible chunks that won't submerge, while salsa has smaller, submerged pieces).

As for the saft~juice distinction, almost all GenAM (or its close relatives) speakers have the grape juice versus grape drink distinction, where drink is a stand in for saft. At least where I live, nectar means nothing, except that its one or more of the three - expensive, sweetened, purified/organic/etc. The basis is that it's more of an advertising term, stressing that it's in some way of higher quality.

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Now, by making just a few small changes, we prettify the orthography for happier socialist tomorrow!
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^ WHS. Except for the log thing and the Andean panpipers.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 8:52 am 
Avisaru
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schwhatever wrote:
Chibi wrote:
Apiya wrote:
I wish English would have a word for the macedonian Претркување or in slang Тицање. It is when you're driving and you go infront of of another car. I don't remember hearing that word in english


to cut (someone) off...that's what's used around here, I don't know about other regions, but I imagine it's fairly widespread.


Also to shun and to exile, although both (especially the latter) have stronger implications than to cut off.

You banish people when you drive :D?


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 9:42 am 
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My experience in American grocery stores is that grape drink is just grape juice made cheaper by mixing it with sugar water. And is not called juice only because it's illegal to do so.

In Serbian, coca-cola is a kind of juice?

The English word salsa (as opposed to Spanish where it means sauce) should only refer to something with chiles in it. But that might just be New Mexican snobbishness talking.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 1:45 pm 
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Quote:
Also to shun and to exile, although both (especially the latter) have stronger implications than to cut off.

I agree, though each has it's own little nuances. "cut off" seems to be most similar with "interupt", like in "I cut him off in midsentence." "shun" and "exile" are similar, though "exile" implies that the person was forced to leave the land, while "shun" means just to ignore someone.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2008 3:45 pm 
Niš
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linguoboy wrote:
If the latter is made from cooked fruit, "compote" might be appropriate.


No, saft has nothing to do with fruit! :D Compote is alright, but saft is what schnitzel or some other type of meat is prepared with.

Endymion wrote:
In Serbian, coca-cola is a kind of juice?


Well, juice in Serbian is actually the orange or grapefruit drink (Serb. ђус), and is used like a brand name, like coca-cola or vodka, however any other drink is also called juice (Serb. сок). The difference is that the Serbian word for the fruit drink is "sok", and it translates to juice, but the word juice itself, "djus", is a loan from English which refers to that particular tipe of fruit juice.

So, coca-cola is a kind of "sok" (drink, juice), and orange juice ("djus") is also a kind of "sok". ;)


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:53 pm 
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zlatiborica wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
If the latter is made from cooked fruit, "compote" might be appropriate.

No, saft has nothing to do with fruit! :D Compote is alright, but saft is what schnitzel or some other type of meat is prepared with.

Sounds like "gravy", a sauce prepared with pan drippings. You threw me off with your use of "saft", because in German this refers only to the meat juices (Bratensaft). When they are combined with a roux made of drippings and flour, the result is [Braten]soße (from the French sauce).

(Wiener Schnitzel, by the way, is usually served with no sauce at all, only a lemon wedge. I've had a variation called Rahmschnitzel before, which is served with a cream sauce, but this is actually a German adaptation of a French recipe.)

Oh, and my boyfriend suggested another useful term: coulis, which refers to a sauce made by cooking and straining vegetables or fruits that is generally served chilled.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 24, 2008 10:53 pm 
Lebom
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linguoboy wrote:
Oh, and my boyfriend suggested another useful term: coulis, which refers to a sauce made by cooking and straining vegetables or fruits that is generally served chilled.

Out of curiosity is it /kuli/ since it looks French?

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Now, by making just a few small changes, we prettify the orthography for happier socialist tomorrow!
Xonen wrote:
^ WHS. Except for the log thing and the Andean panpipers.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:23 am 
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Punkygelado wrote:
Shouldn't it be called Blutsaft then? I'm more or less fluent in German, but not much of a juice-expert really.

Oh, that's right. I remembered wrong.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 9:04 am 
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schwhatever wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Oh, and my boyfriend suggested another useful term: coulis, which refers to a sauce made by cooking and straining vegetables or fruits that is generally served chilled.

Out of curiosity is it /kuli/ since it looks French?


Yep.


Quote:
to cut (someone) off...that's what's used around here, I don't know about other regions, but I imagine it's fairly widespread.


Here (England) I would say to "cut someone up". To cut someone off would be to hang up on them on the phone or just generally interupt them.




Quote:
So, coca-cola is a kind of "sok" (drink, juice), and orange juice ("djus") is also a kind of "sok".


Haha, that just made me laugh so much just 'cause in my head I was reading "Coca Cola is a kind of sock". :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 11:52 am 
Sanno
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Emma wrote:
schwhatever wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Oh, and my boyfriend suggested another useful term: coulis, which refers to a sauce made by cooking and straining vegetables or fruits that is generally served chilled.

Out of curiosity is it /kuli/ since it looks French?

Yep.

There's also the charming doublet cullis pronounced exactly as you would expect (i.e. /'cVlIs/) which means "beef tea".


Quote:
Quote:
to cut (someone) off...that's what's used around here, I don't know about other regions, but I imagine it's fairly widespread.

Here (England) I would say to "cut someone up". To cut someone off would be to hang up on them on the phone or just generally interupt them.

WOW! Be careful about using that in North America--people will start backing away slowly and glancing furtively about for police officers if you tell them you "cut someone up on the highway"!


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 12:31 pm 
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linguoboy wrote:
Quote:
Quote:
to cut (someone) off...that's what's used around here, I don't know about other regions, but I imagine it's fairly widespread.

Here (England) I would say to "cut someone up". To cut someone off would be to hang up on them on the phone or just generally interupt them.

WOW! Be careful about using that in North America--people will start backing away slowly and glancing furtively about for police officers if you tell them you "cut someone up on the highway"!


And start making jokes about Sweeney Todd.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:48 pm 
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linguoboy wrote:
WOW! Be careful about using that in North America--people will start backing away slowly and glancing furtively about for police officers if you tell them you "cut someone up on the highway"!


Or at best think you are doing comedy while driving. That is still odd enough to warrant backing away.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 5:50 pm 
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linguoboy wrote:
There's also the charming doublet cullis pronounced exactly as you would expect (i.e. /'cVlIs/) which means "beef tea".
Out of interest, does "beef tea" mean the same thing in the US as it does in the UK?

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 5:51 pm 
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"beef tea" doesn't mean anything to me, other than what I can imagine it to be.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 5:52 pm 
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Wycoval wrote:
"beef tea" doesn't mean anything to me, other than what I can imagine it to be.

WHS

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:11 pm 
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Other than having beef for supper, I don't have any ideas.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:17 pm 
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Dewrad wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
There's also the charming doublet cullis pronounced exactly as you would expect (i.e. /'cVlIs/) which means "beef tea".
Out of interest, does "beef tea" mean the same thing in the US as it does in the UK?

Not at all. Anyone with notably less exposure to British media than myself would probably think you were making some sort of foul joke and have no idea that you were referring to what they call "(beef) bouillon", "(beef) broth", or "(beef) consommé".


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