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PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 8:25 pm 
Avisaru
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Jashan wrote:
Not that it will ever catch on.


I like it, if that's any comfort. :D

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 2:10 pm 
Avisaru
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Jashan wrote:
Before I knew what "schadenfreude" was (or rather, that the word existed), I coined a word for it on my own: doomglory.

doomglory n. a person who takes delight in the misfortune of others indirectly (rather than causing such misfortune directly).

I guess you could adjectivize it as doomglor(y)ish or doomglorious.
I like that one! A lot!


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 2:11 pm 
Avisaru
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Jashan wrote:
Before I knew what "schadenfreude" was (or rather, that the word existed), I coined a word for it on my own: doomglory.

doomglory n. a person who takes delight in the misfortune of others indirectly (rather than causing such misfortune directly).

I guess you could adjectivize it as doomglor(y)ish or doomglorious.
I like that one! A lot!


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 30, 2008 5:27 pm 
Sanci
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Jashan, I actually used your term today. One of my friends watched me get snapped with a rubberband and they laughed, so I said "You're such a doomglory".

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 7:58 am 
Avisaru
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A very nice word, tho IMO a bit too Nietzschean for the sense I gather you're after here. It sounds like it should be only reserved for a truly epic levels of schadenfreude, like being all "ha ha look at how well that economic liberalism of yours is working now, eh?" as of late. Granted, I think that's a problem with "schadenfreude" itself just as well.

Wiktionary suggests a hellenismization of "epicaricacy", so "epicaricacious" should also work, but it's not much better…

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 1:46 pm 
Avisaru
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Qwynegold wrote:
Hmm, Wikipedia tells me that saft is made by boiling water, fruit or berries and sugar, while juice is made by squeezing it out from fruits, vegetables or berries. So the real difference is in how they are made, but generally (IMO) saft is most often made from berries while juice tends to be made out of fruit.

That's probably the technical definition, yes. To me it's mostly about what you use it for: juice is healthy stuff you drink with breakfast or other normal meals, saft is the sugary thing kids drink when eating cookies. Sadly they don't seem to have much saft here (in England), so I guess that's why they don't have a word for it.

Emma wrote:
That's odd about juice and saft being different things. Whenever I've bought German orange juice it's called 'Orangensaft', though. Or is it just maybe that we call both juice and Germans call both saft and other languages might distinguish more? Hmm.

That's right.
Altho I have a friend who is basically bilingual German+Swedish, and his family distinguishes between /saft/ (the Swedish one) and /zaft/ (the German).

Nadreck wrote:
A friend of mine pointed out that Tagalog has two forms for "we", one that includes the person being spoken to, and one that doesn't.

Yeah, that would be good. Tho a proper singular "you" as higher priority. I think a lot of languages have this. Doesn't Chinese have it too?

äreo wrote:
People should start to use Middle English pronouns again. They were ckool.

Hail hail.

Jashan wrote:
doomglory n. a person who takes delight in the misfortune of others indirectly (rather than causing such misfortune directly).

I guess you could adjectivize it as doomglor(y)ish or doomglorious.

I think it's a bit long. And how is it a kind of glory? Isn't it more a kind of happiness? I suggest "doomjoy", or some other "-joy".


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2008 12:18 pm 
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instead of doomglory I named it Shethodreke.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2008 3:00 pm 
Avisaru
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Tropylium wrote:
Wiktionary suggests a hellenismization of "epicaricacy", so "epicaricacious" should also work, but it's not much better…
Maybe it's not better; but it's still great! Thanks!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 5:35 am 
Smeric
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I think doommirth works better than either doomglory or doomjoy because it sticks with germanic words.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 12:04 pm 
Smeric
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I miss ju and väl from Swedish. And in Swedish, I miss indeed.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2009 2:05 pm 
Avisaru
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Skomakar'n wrote:
I miss ju and väl from Swedish. And in Swedish, I miss indeed.


'but' sometimes covers ju pretty well, and väl sometimes is pretty well covered by tag questions.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2009 6:44 pm 
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Tengado wrote:
In Yorkshire, we have a verb "to thoil" [no clue onspelling, I've never seen it written].
<snip>

Dootehr languages/dialects of english have such a word?


That's from the standard English (now archaic, I reckon) word "thole", from Old English þolian, meaning to endure, tolerate, put up with, brook, bear, stand, and so on. It seems to be widely used in Scottish English and Scots.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 16, 2009 7:16 pm 
Smeric
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Bryan wrote:
Tengado wrote:
In Yorkshire, we have a verb "to thoil" [no clue onspelling, I've never seen it written].
<snip>

Dootehr languages/dialects of english have such a word?


That's from the standard English (now archaic, I reckon) word "thole", from Old English þolian, meaning to endure, tolerate, put up with, brook, bear, stand, and so on. It seems to be widely used in Scottish English and Scots.

I'm sure that's a cognate to Icelandic þola and Swedish tåla.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2010 12:38 am 
Avisaru
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jmcd wrote:
I think doommirth works better than either doomglory or doomjoy because it sticks with germanic words.


I dunno... I personally think that sounds like too much, too many 'big' (idea) words.
Doomglory has that politically tone to it, but doomjoy fits perfectly with killjoy. It'd probably catch on fast.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 4:00 pm 
Lebom
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I'd like standard English to have a word from my dialect, 'arlarse', describing an action that was really mean and unfair. There's no other word in English I can think of with the same degree; 'mean' definitely doesn't cut it. 'sly' has a similar meaning (I'm not sure if that's normal usage or just my area) but 'arlarse' is even stronger than that.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 30, 2010 3:18 pm 
Avisaru
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Skomakar'n wrote:
I'm sure that's a cognate to Icelandic þola and Swedish tåla.
And to "tolerate", though at a longer remove in time.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 1:43 pm 
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This one's the opposite. I wish other languages had a word for "just" that was used as often as it is in English. I know French has "juste" but it's not used as often as English "just." We're obsessed with this word!

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 09, 2010 4:43 pm 
Avisaru
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Bryan wrote:
Tengado wrote:
In Yorkshire, we have a verb "to thoil" [no clue onspelling, I've never seen it written].
<snip>

Dootehr languages/dialects of english have such a word?


That's from the standard English (now archaic, I reckon) word "thole", from Old English þolian, meaning to endure, tolerate, put up with, brook, bear, stand, and so on. It seems to be widely used in Scottish English and Scots.

It's cognate to the Latin verb ferre which had double suppletion; latus and tollere are among its principal parts.
Cognates that sound like tollere or þolian and so on, seem to be more wide-spread among I.-E. languages than those that sound like latus. But bear and ferre sound alike through the various regular sound changes that IEists have studied and documented over the two centuries since Jones's first proposal of IE.
Anyway: "translate" and "transfer" are both derived from the same Latin verb, even though they don't sound related (which is also from the same verb that "referred" is from).


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 8:42 am 
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Viktor77 wrote:
This one's the opposite. I wish other languages had a word for "just" that was used as often as it is in English. I know French has "juste" but it's not used as often as English "just." We're obsessed with this word!


Also "way."

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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 14, 2010 3:29 am 
Avisaru
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[quote="Viktor77"]This one's the opposite. I wish other languages had a word for "just" that was used as often as it is in English. I know French has "juste" but it's not used as often as English "just." We're obsessed with this word![/quote]

Too obsessed. Ninety-nine times out of a hundred you can remove "just" from a sentence and lose nothing. When editing a piece of writing, one of the first things I do is remove all instances of "just".

Edit: the option to enable bbcode doesn't appear. That's some old bullshit.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2010 1:36 pm 
Avisaru
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'Echdoe', 'echnos', and 'drenydd'. Not being able to say 'the day before yesterday' is tremendously annoying.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 15, 2010 1:55 pm 
Smeric
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[quote="YngNghymru"]Not being able to say 'the day before yesterday'.[/quote]
Yes. Also, 'the day after tomorrow'.

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Off-topic: Why is BBCode deactivated in this thread for me? Berek too, it seems.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 29, 2011 5:04 pm 
Sanci
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Spanish has the word compadre which expresses the relationship between a father and a godfather. Presumably there are similar words involving mothers and godmothers. English doesn't have words for these, but it should.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 30, 2011 6:41 pm 
Smeric
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Count Iblis wrote:
Spanish has the word compadre which expresses the relationship between a father and a godfather. Presumably there are similar words involving mothers and godmothers. English doesn't have words for these, but it should.


In limited usage in AmE, we have "compadre" to mean "companion" or "friend", afaik.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 11:22 am 
Avisaru
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Bristel wrote:
In limited usage in AmE, we have "compadre" to mean "companion" or "friend", afaik.

Also "commadre".
I'm sure "commadre" is less well-known than "compadre" among American English-speakers.
Catholics and AFAIK Episcopalians (and maybe some other denominations) have the compadrazgo in the USA; different national-origin ethnicities use different words for it (e.g. "padrino" is "godfather" in Italian).
"Compadre" and "commadre" in the English of American states with a lot of Mexican or Puerto-Rican or Filipino or other Hispanic influence, means a very good friend with an unbreakable friendship. Like "BFF", as I understand that modernism ("Best Friends Forever"). A male BFF is a compadre, a female BFF is a commadre.
I have a couple of goddaughters, so I have two compadres and two commadres. Since the relationships started in Texas, those Spanish terms are the terms we use, though the native languages are English (for me and one of the compadres) and Chinese (for the commadres and the other compadre).


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