zompist bboard
http://www.incatena.org/

I wish English had a word for this!
http://www.incatena.org/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=19697
Page 12 of 14

Author:  Herr Dunkel [ Sat Apr 28, 2012 7:53 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

I'd say that "and" and "so" would be of a more apt connotation.

Author:  Astraios [ Sat Apr 28, 2012 7:56 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

You think that only because they use a more similar intonation pattern to na und (i.e. rising). So what doesn't use that intonation all the time, but it certainly can, and even when it doesn't, it's still perfectly interchangeable with and and so.

Author:  Herr Dunkel [ Sat Apr 28, 2012 7:57 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

That much I agree with.

Author:  Astraios [ Sat Apr 28, 2012 7:58 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

So you agree that na und = so what. Good.

Author:  Herr Dunkel [ Sat Apr 28, 2012 8:00 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Astraios wrote:
So you agree that na und = so what. Good.

Good =/= desireable

Author:  Jipí [ Sun Apr 29, 2012 6:14 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

"So what?" is a perfectly suitable translation for "Na und?" It's commonly used in the same contexts in the same way.

(I say this as a native speaker of German, which you definitely aren't, DG. Not even of Upper Bavarian.)

Author:  Herr Dunkel [ Mon Apr 30, 2012 12:01 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Jipí wrote:
"So what?" is a perfectly suitable translation for "Na und?" It's commonly used in the same contexts in the same way.

(I say this as a native speaker of German, which you definitely aren't, DG. Not even of Upper Bavarian.)


And, what, you're going to say I'm Saxon or something now?

Author:  brandrinn [ Wed May 02, 2012 11:39 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

FYI: L&L Museum does not get pruned. Please do not fill it with useless posts.

Author:  hoelzro [ Fri May 11, 2012 6:30 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

I'm a native speaker of English, but I often lament the absence of the word "doch" in the language. I also wish English had single words for "the day before yesterday" and "the day after tomorrow" like German and Dutch do.

I feel like there should be a "Concepts/Words Not In English" category on Wikipedia...

Author:  Jipí [ Fri May 11, 2012 7:05 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

hoelzro wrote:
I also wish English had single words for "the day before yesterday" and "the day after tomorrow" like German and Dutch do.

Ereyester and overmorrow … ~

BTW, does Hindi expand its 'today ± 1' + FUT/PST for 'tomorrow/yesterday' resp. to the day after tomorrow and the day before yesterday, too?

Author:  ná'oolkiłí [ Fri May 11, 2012 8:16 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

In Georgian there's:
გუშინწინ / gušinc̣in / the day before yesterday
გუშინ / gušin / yesterday
დღეს / dğes / today
ხვალ / xval / tomorrow
ზეგ / zeg / the day after tomorrow
მაზეგ / mazeg / the day after the day after tomorrow

Author:  installer_swan [ Fri May 11, 2012 3:51 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Jipí wrote:
hoelzro wrote:
I also wish English had single words for "the day before yesterday" and "the day after tomorrow" like German and Dutch do.

Ereyester and overmorrow … ~

BTW, does Hindi expand its 'today ± 1' + FUT/PST for 'tomorrow/yesterday' resp. to the day after tomorrow and the day before yesterday, too?

Yes. परसों = +/- 2 days. Not just that, we also have नरसों = +/- 3 days.

Author:  Torco [ Fri May 11, 2012 4:13 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

hoelzro wrote:
I'm a native speaker of English, but I often lament the absence of the word "doch" in the language. I also wish English had single words for "the day before yesterday" and "the day after tomorrow" like German and Dutch do.

I feel like there should be a "Concepts/Words Not In English" category on Wikipedia...


we have anteayer and pasado respectively... maybe it's possible to import the latter into English ? [p@s@4oU] ?

Author:  Rui [ Fri May 11, 2012 5:03 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

installer_swan wrote:
Yes. परसों = +/- 2 days. Not just that, we also have नरसों = +/- 3 days.


Yep, German also has vorvorgestern and überübermorgen if you really need them. I think it's productive, too. Though undoubtedly very rare, at that point more general time phrases would be used.

Author:  Jipí [ Fri May 11, 2012 5:49 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Chibi wrote:
installer_swan wrote:
Yes. परसों = +/- 2 days. Not just that, we also have नरसों = +/- 3 days.

Yep, German also has vorvorgestern and überübermorgen if you really need them. I think it's productive, too. Though undoubtedly very rare, at that point more general time phrases would be used.

That's right, but they're basically restricted to spoken language and formed by analogy from normal vorgestern (before-yesterday) and übermorgen (over-tomorrow).

How do par(a?)soṃ and nar(a?)soṃ break down, though, since they've got the -soṃ element in common?

Author:  Whimemsz [ Fri May 11, 2012 6:26 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Torco wrote:
hoelzro wrote:
I'm a native speaker of English, but I often lament the absence of the word "doch" in the language. I also wish English had single words for "the day before yesterday" and "the day after tomorrow" like German and Dutch do.

I feel like there should be a "Concepts/Words Not In English" category on Wikipedia...


we have anteayer and pasado respectively... maybe it's possible to import the latter into English ? [p@s@4oU] ?

It would have to be something more like /pəˈsɑdoʊ/ = [pʰəˈsɑːɾoʊ] (for GA)

Author:  Zontas [ Tue Jun 19, 2012 10:06 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Mosquito "repellant" isn't actually repelling you from them. It actually hides you from them by blocking out their senses. We need a word for this phenomenon, if there isn't one already.

Also, pronouns that distinguish between direct object and indirect object, tertiary indicative distinction, plural second person pronouns reinstated into the language, exclusive "we", a term for unknown gender (pronoun), and some it object form(s); if no one has mentioned these already.

Author:  Gulliver [ Wed Jun 20, 2012 2:39 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Helios wrote:
Mosquito "repellant" isn't actually repelling you from them. It actually hides you from them by blocking out their senses. We need a word for this phenomenon, if there isn't one already.

Masquito or mosquerade. No, the latter sounds like you're setting up sham mosques.

Author:  Wattmann [ Wed Jun 20, 2012 4:42 am ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Sehnsucht is a neat non-English word, for which plenty papers've been written.
Alternative: second meal of the day, taken during the night (it's silly to call it lunch, and it's def not a dinner!)

Author:  Zontas [ Wed Jun 20, 2012 12:07 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Wattmann wrote:
Sehnsucht is a neat non-English word, for which plenty papers've been written.
Alternative: second meal of the day, taken during the night (it's silly to call it lunch, and it's def not a dinner!)


Linner? Dunch??

Also, how about a word cognate (with derivatives akin to "know") to German wissen? Maybe we can just modify "wit", because that's the closest I could come working backward with German and English sound changes.

Author:  Astraios [ Wed Jun 20, 2012 2:37 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Wattmann wrote:
Alternative: second meal of the day, taken during the night (it's silly to call it lunch, and it's def not a dinner!)
If you're having a meal at night it's either a midnight snack, a midnight feast, or supper. What number meal it is doesn't matter.

Author:  Melteor [ Sat Jun 23, 2012 12:41 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Re: Op

Mathematics jargon has a word for this but no one is going to know what you're talking about. Have you ever heard, "To the n-th degree"? 'n-th' is the word you want. It's like whatth, but you can't use it interrogatively, you have to sort of make a Jeopardy statement with it. "You were n-th in line? I mean, like fifth, sixth, etc.?" "I was fifth." "Oh ok."

Or just ask where in in line. Yeah, that.

If its car ownership you could literally ask where he is in line of ownership. Keywords being where and line.


Magb wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
So far, slesk is sounding extremely close to the ordinary slang application of English "slick". A slick song, a slick person, a very slick manoeuvre--all have connotations similar to what you're describing in the register I'm most familiar with.

I figured it would sound that way from my description. Well, in my mind there's some crucial difference between the two words, but since I can't put my finger on what it is it's likely that it is, in fact, just in my mind.

It seems like an aesthetic difference because you can usually substitute smooth for slick. Slick is usually a little sarcastic. In Massachusetts the word they use is "wicked" and for people who are suckers, "tools". I think that gets at what you're talking about a little better, and it just reinforces everyone's opinion of Massholes.


Helios wrote:
Mosquito "repellant" isn't actually repelling you from them. It actually hides you from them by blocking out their senses. We need a word for this phenomenon, if there isn't one already.

Also, pronouns that distinguish between direct object and indirect object, tertiary indicative distinction, plural second person pronouns reinstated into the language, exclusive "we", a term for unknown gender (pronoun), and some it object form(s); if no one has mentioned these already.


Wait, how exactly does it work? Do they stop seeing infrared because they're poisoned? Is it like a flashbang? Or is it oversaturating or overpowering their noses?

For the exclusive 'we' I like Bislama's pronoun system, it's totally badass and cagey, they can talk about a crowd of people with their pronoun system. I propose 'guys' as the suffix meaning more than three, so for inclusive it would be "You, me, guys" = Youmeguys. The guys would come from addressing a crowd (i.e. Guys, lets go in, get out quick!), in this case it would be extended to just imply there are several people involved to the hearer(s). Pretty awesome huh?


din wrote:
Eccentric Iconoclast wrote:
Well, we do have 'uh-uh', which I don't know if it can be considered a word or not, but it exists. :P


But you can't say "He uh-uh did that!" :D
You can use emphasis on the verb 'to do', and negate it for the opposite, but it still isn't quite as good

For negative statements I would usually say something like "Does to!" or "Is to!" ie. "Unicorns aren't real/ don't exist." "Do to!"
If its negative, well, better than Uh-uh have Nuh-uh! For some reason I think of sassy girls saying these...I think 'si' would be a pretty good word for English to absorb, but these 2 syllable "things" work fine enough.

Author:  Pole, the [ Sat Jun 23, 2012 1:58 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

How is this called: the situation where everything is in the right quantity, not too much, not too little?
The closest approximations would be balance, harmony.
Has English more accurate word for it?

Author:  Click [ Sat Jun 23, 2012 7:23 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

My best guess for the word you've looking for is optimal, but I could be wrong.

Author:  Zontas [ Sat Jun 23, 2012 9:06 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: I wish English had a word for this!

Gulliver wrote:
Helios wrote:
Mosquito "repellant" isn't actually repelling you from them. It actually hides you from them by blocking out their senses. We need a word for this phenomenon, if there isn't one already.

Masquito or mosquerade. No, the latter sounds like you're setting up sham mosques.


Nah, both of them relate too specific too mosquitos than the actual sense of the word. You're right about the latter seeming like a sham mosque chain. Sorry for acting like a douche in another thread.

Page 12 of 14 All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
https://www.phpbb.com/