zompist bboard
http://www.incatena.org/

The Suppletion Thread
http://www.incatena.org/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=35376
Page 4 of 4

Author:  Echobeats [ Sun Aug 15, 2010 4:43 am ]
Post subject: 

Dingbats wrote:
TomHChappell wrote:
"He went home" originally was a proper answer for "Whither (i.e. which way) did he go?". It was not originally a proper answer for "Where (i.e to what place) did he go?"

Is this really how the distinction between "where" and "whither" worked? In the related Swedish, which retains the contrast (at least in the standard), both of those questions would use the equivalent of "whither", since both ask for a direction. "Where" would mean something like "In which place did he walk around without going anywhere?" (but is of course in practice just nothing you would say).

Yeah, whither means "where to". I've never heard of a difference between different kinds of "where to".

Author:  Shm Jay [ Sun Aug 15, 2010 7:46 am ]
Post subject: 

The paradigm was where/whither/whence and here/hither/hence. I don’t remember if there was a third set for some other adverb.

Author:  Radius Solis [ Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:51 pm ]
Post subject: 

There/thither/thence.

Author:  TomHChappell [ Fri Aug 20, 2010 4:38 pm ]
Post subject: 

Echobeats wrote:
Dingbats wrote:
TomHChappell wrote:
"He went home" originally was a proper answer for "Whither (i.e. which way) did he go?". It was not originally a proper answer for "Where (i.e to what place) did he go?"

Is this really how the distinction between "where" and "whither" worked? In the related Swedish, which retains the contrast (at least in the standard), both of those questions would use the equivalent of "whither", since both ask for a direction. "Where" would mean something like "In which place did he walk around without going anywhere?" (but is of course in practice just nothing you would say).

Yeah, whither means "where to". I've never heard of a difference between different kinds of "where to".

AIUI you're saying something like:
here/there/where was locative/adessive (location);
hither/thither/whither was allative (destination or goal);
hence/thence/whence was ablative (source).

But AIUI English actually used here/there/where for destinations and goals, and used hither/thither/whither for directions.

I could be wrong.

[EDIT]: In which case I should have said "whither" and "whitherward", rather than "where" and "whither". That is, the original "went" was an answer to "whitherward". [/EDIT]

Author:  Radius Solis [ Fri Aug 20, 2010 9:28 pm ]
Post subject: 

Actually there is a suppletion in the paradigm, just a different one I hadn't spotted before:

where - whither - whence - when
there - thither - thence - then
here - hither - hence - now


Whither did 'hen' go?

Author:  Nortaneous [ Fri Aug 20, 2010 9:30 pm ]
Post subject: 

Also, why does "here" have /i/ when "where" and "there" have /e/?

Actually, I guess the real question would be why "where" and "there" have /e/, since <eCe> is usually /i/.

Author:  tezcatlip0ca [ Fri Aug 20, 2010 11:53 pm ]
Post subject: 

[null]

Page 4 of 4 All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
https://www.phpbb.com/