zompist bboard
http://www.incatena.org/

Odd natlang features thread
http://www.incatena.org/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=39658
Page 15 of 15

Author:  Acid Badger [ Mon Nov 27, 2017 8:07 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Odd natlang features thread

Disfixes I guess are odd enough: There is a trend across Central German dialects to lenite certain intervocalic consonants, including combinations of a nasal and a plosive. Morphologically this meant such clusters were lenited in plural forms, where they'd be followed by a vowel, but not in singular forms, where they'd be in word-final position. Together with further sound changes, this created some interesting patterns in various dialects: [hant] vs [hɛn] "hand/s", [gʀɔnt] vs [gʀən] (Luxembourgish); [ʃlɑːx] vs [ʃləi̯], [dɑːx] vs [deː] (also Luxembourgish); [tsant] vs [tsɛŋ] "tooth/teeth", [hant] vs [hɛŋ] "hand/s" (Rhine Franconian); [kɛɪ̯nt] vs [kɛŋ] "child/children", [rəŋk] vs [riŋ] "ring/s", [vaːlt] vs [vɛl] "forest/s" and [ʃux] vs [ʃɔʊ̯] "shoe/s" (Upper Hessian); [kɛi̯nt] vs [kɛŋ] "child/children", [kruːk] vs [kryː] "jug/s" and [ʃtui̯ɐk] vs [ʃtʏr] "stork/s" (Ruhla dialect, Thuringia). Etc.

Author:  kanejam [ Thu Feb 08, 2018 5:23 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Odd natlang features thread

Apparently the Papuan language Berik can inflect its verbs for 3 numbers, 5 tenses, 3 times of day, 2 distances, 3 sizes of object, 2 genders, sometimes 2 heights, as well as a continuous action marker (though not all at once it seems). The phrase kitobana means "he/she gives three large objects to a male in the sunlight". golbilint and terbefe are other forms from the same paradigm.

It also has the famous six vowel system /a e i o u ə/.

Author:  Imralu [ Fri Feb 09, 2018 2:09 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Odd natlang features thread

Vijay wrote:
I'm actually not sure that's so odd. At least, I know anecdotally that some languages have specialized words for 'to eat'...like 'to eat (anything)' vs. 'to eat a meal', and this distinction is found across a pretty wide variety of languages, too.
It's quite common also for sign languages to use different classifying verbs depending on what is being eaten and how.

Author:  Vijay [ Sat Feb 10, 2018 1:55 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Odd natlang features thread

Imralu wrote:
Vijay wrote:
I'm actually not sure that's so odd. At least, I know anecdotally that some languages have specialized words for 'to eat'...like 'to eat (anything)' vs. 'to eat a meal', and this distinction is found across a pretty wide variety of languages, too.
It's quite common also for sign languages to use different classifying verbs depending on what is being eaten and how.

Interesting, thanks!

Author:  Birdlang [ Fri Apr 06, 2018 6:22 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Odd natlang features thread

Toda has an unusual vowel system for a Dravidian language, and a lot of articulations.
Source PHOIBLE.
http://phoible.org/inventories/view/1793

Page 15 of 15 All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
https://www.phpbb.com/