Irish Lessons - Ranganna Gaeilge

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linguoboy
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Post by linguoboy »

Egein wrote:"'Bhfuil" (not An bhfuil)?

Does anyone say /@n'vil/ for an bhfuil? I thought the /n/ was deleted in speech and the remaining /@/ tends to get swallowed up by nearby vowels. Thus, in a sentence like C?n chaoi a bhfuil t??, it gets overwhelmed by the /i:/ of chaoi.

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Post by aardwolf »

linguoboy wrote:
Egein wrote:"'Bhfuil" (not An bhfuil)?

Does anyone say /@n'vil/ for an bhfuil? I thought the /n/ was deleted in speech and the remaining /@/ tends to get swallowed up by nearby vowels. Thus, in a sentence like C?n chaoi a bhfuil t??, it gets overwhelmed by the /i:/ of chaoi.

C?n chaoi a bhfuil t?? is generally pronounced ["kE xi "wIL tu].
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Post by Egein »

But what about inniu as inniubh?
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Post by aardwolf »

Egein wrote:But what about inniu as inniubh?

I think the inniumh version is in the south and conemara. i'll check that one out.

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Post by Egein »

I tried saying this:
English: Distance makes the heart grow weak.
And I got this:
Irish: Laga?onn an fad an croi.

But I feel something is wrong. Perhaps too long not studied.
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Post by Egein »

And then:

Time destroys everything
Scriosann an t-am gach aon rud.
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Post by Egein »

And then I wanted to say:

The poet is a liar who always says the truth.
So I had:

T? an file br?agad?ir a (d?anta na f?rinne) i gc?na?.

What I don't understand is why it's d?anta na f?rinne. It seems to me it would be an expression, as in "well, to tell you the truth, she's sick - Uell, t? s? tinn, d?anta na f?rinne).

So what is "to speak truth"?
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Post by aardwolf »

Egein wrote:And then I wanted to say:

The poet is a liar who always says the truth.
So I had:

T? an file br?agad?ir a (d?anta na f?rinne) i gc?na?.

What I don't understand is why it's d?anta na f?rinne. It seems to me it would be an expression, as in "well, to tell you the truth, she's sick - Uell, t? s? tinn, d?anta na f?rinne).

So what is "to speak truth"?

"To tell the truth" is "inis an fh?rinne".

The main problem with the above sentence is that you're saying "*T? an file br?agad?ir". I cannot emphasise enough (all you budding Irish-speakers out there, listen up!) how important correct useage of the copula is. When you say that one thing is another thing, you must must must use the copula. So it's "Is br?agad?ir ? an file", literally, "Is a_liar him the poet". "T?" is not a copula. "T?" is used for describibng qualities, "T? an file ?g" for example.

Anyway, back to the sentence:
"Is br?agad?ir a ins?onn an fh?rinne i gc?na? ? an file."
Lit: Is liar who tells the truth (in) always him the poet.

EDIT: fixed code.
Last edited by aardwolf on Tue Feb 21, 2006 12:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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linguoboy
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Post by linguoboy »

aardwolf wrote:"T?" is not a copula. "T?" is used for describibng qualities, "T? an file ?g" for example.

It may help the more etymological-minded to know that t? is derived from a verb meaning "stand". Consider how in English we regularly say "He stands tall", but ?"He stands a liar" would probably come under the rubric of poetic license. (That is unless it meant "He buys a liar drinks.")

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Post by aardwolf »

linguoboy wrote:
aardwolf wrote:"T?" is not a copula. "T?" is used for describibng qualities, "T? an file ?g" for example.

It may help the more etymological-minded to know that t? is derived from a verb meaning "stand".

I did not know that; very cool.

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Post by Tengado »

AnTeallach wrote:I've heard something that sounded (to my English ears) like [D] in RTE pronunciations of Garda.


Is this perhaps because the sound in Garda sounds like the way Irish people often pronounce what should be a [D] in English?
- "But this can be stopped."
- "No, I came all this way to show you this because nothing can be done. Because I like the way your pupils dilate in the presence of total planetary Armageddon.
Yes, it can be stopped."

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Post by julianallees »

What do all those question marks (???) stand for in the irish words?

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Post by Chengjiang »

julianallees wrote:What do all those question marks (???) stand for in the irish words?


Some time ago, this board switched servers, and in the process of doing so all characters not in the basic ASCII set got converted to ?'s.

And please stop putting the bloody date and time in every post. We don't need to see it.
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Post by dhok »

Thread revival...
I looked at Irish phonology on Wikipedia.
What the heck happened on its journey from PIE?

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Re: Irish Lessons - Ranganna Gaeilge

Post by dhok »

Why thank you, Mr. Joyce.

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Post by alice »

dhokarena56 wrote:Thread revival...
I looked at Irish phonology on Wikipedia.
What the heck happened on its journey from PIE?


In case you haven't found out yet: a combination of lenition, palatalisation, reduction and loss of unstressed syllables, vocalisation of intervocalic voiced fricatives, other stuff to weird to mention here, and much cheap handbagging from China.
Zompist's Markov generator wrote:it was labelled" orange marmalade," but that is unutterably hideous.

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