Weird phrases from real languages

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Spandaux
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Post by Spandaux »

rickardspaghetti wrote:
Qwynegold wrote:
Spandaux wrote:As well as other languages named herein Swedish also is an agglutinative language.

Eh, what???


I think she's mistaking "being capable of forming very long words" for agglutinative. They are not the same.
Oh yeah sorry. I was just thinking about my conlang when I was copying that. :S I did mean what you said. I didnt even think to check it.
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Skomakar'n
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Post by Skomakar'n »

Ankan och korpen frågade vargen en fråga.

Ew. Loanwords and strange forms that are inconsistent with the ones used in other Northern Germanic Languages, or even Germanic ones at all.

Anden och ramnen sporde ulven en spörjning/ett spörsmål.

Ahhh.

Yes, it does count as a weird phrase, because it's fucked up! D:

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rickardspaghetti
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Post by rickardspaghetti »

Dammit, skomakar'n! Get over yourself!
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。

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Post by Aszev »

Anka, korp and varg are all native words fyi. Just because other languages don't use them doesn't make them any less Scandinavian.
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Radagast
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Post by Radagast »

Korp has to be a loan from latin. Fråga has plenty of Germanic cognates - German frage for example.
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Aszev
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Post by Aszev »

Radagast wrote:Korp has to be a loan from latin. Fråga has plenty of Germanic cognates - German frage for example.
korp is a Scandinavian made word, ultimately based on onomatopoeia, similar to the origin of Latin corvus, but unrelated.
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Miekko wrote:protip: no one wants to learn your conlangs. if they claim different, it's just to be friendly. this is true for all conlangers.

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rickardspaghetti
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Post by rickardspaghetti »

What about "korv"? Is it a Scandinavian word to? In Danish they say "pølse". They obviously cannot be related to each other, but are they both of Scandinavian origin?
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。

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Skomakar'n
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Post by Skomakar'n »

Aszev wrote:Anka, korp and varg are all native words fyi. Just because other languages don't use them doesn't make them any less Scandinavian.

Yes, varg is Scandinavian, but Swedish is the only language that actively uses it. No, anka is not. It's a loanword, from Finnish ankka. The origin of korp I'm not sure of, but I know that speakers of all other Germanic languages (not just the Northern ones) use their cognates of Swedish ramn.

rickardspaghetti wrote:What about "korv"? Is it a Scandinavian word to? In Danish they say "pølse". They obviously cannot be related to each other, but are they both of Scandinavian origin?

In Danish and Norwegian, it's pølse, and in Icelandic and Faroese, it's pylsa. The Swedish cognate is pölsa.

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rickardspaghetti
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Post by rickardspaghetti »

Skomakar'n wrote:
rickardspaghetti wrote:What about "korv"? Is it a Scandinavian word to? In Danish they say "pølse". They obviously cannot be related to each other, but are they both of Scandinavian origin?

In Danish and Norwegian, it's pølse, and in Icelandic and Faroese, it's pylsa. The Swedish cognate is pölsa.

Then where does "korv" come from?
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。

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Skomakar'n
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Post by Skomakar'n »

rickardspaghetti wrote:
Skomakar'n wrote:
rickardspaghetti wrote:What about "korv"? Is it a Scandinavian word to? In Danish they say "pølse". They obviously cannot be related to each other, but are they both of Scandinavian origin?

In Danish and Norwegian, it's pølse, and in Icelandic and Faroese, it's pylsa. The Swedish cognate is pölsa.

Then where does "korv" come from?

Assholes ruining our language.

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Aszev
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Post by Aszev »

korv is Scandinavian, ON. kurfr, ablauted form to karva
pölsa is from pylsa of unknown origin.

korp is a Scandinavian neologism of onomatopoetic origin, ON. korpr
varg is Scandinavian, with it's meaning shifted in Swedish (originally it meant thief, villain-ish), ON. vargr
anka, after double checking, is either a Low German loan *antke (diminutive of ant 'duck'), or a contraction of the Scandinavian andkona 'female duck'. I'd like to see a source for it being a loan from Finnish, because the opposite is way more likely.
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Post by Skomakar'n »

Doesn't change the fact that all of the other Germanic languages use their cognates of and, except for English, that doesn't have one. Stupid Swedish, trying to be so alternative.

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rickardspaghetti
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Post by rickardspaghetti »

Stupid Swedish, trying to be so alternative.


Yeah. You're the one to say that. :roll:
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。

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Skomakar'n
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Post by Skomakar'n »

rickardspaghetti wrote:
Stupid Swedish, trying to be so alternative.


Yeah. You're the one to say that. :roll:

It was intentional. :D

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rickardspaghetti
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Post by rickardspaghetti »

Skomakar'n wrote:
rickardspaghetti wrote:
Stupid Swedish, trying to be so alternative.


Yeah. You're the one to say that. :roll:

It was intentional. :D

Haha! Skojare där! :P
そうだ。死んでいる人も勃起することが出来る。
俺はその証だ。

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Spandaux
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Post by Spandaux »

rickardspaghetti wrote:
Skomakar'n wrote:
rickardspaghetti wrote:
Stupid Swedish, trying to be so alternative.


Yeah. You're the one to say that. :roll:

It was intentional. :D

Haha! Skojare där! :P
Haha!
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Post by aquatius »

In Japanese:
貴社の記者が汽車で帰社しました。 (kisha no kisha ga kisha de kisha shimashita), which means, "A reporter of a company returned to work by steam train."

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Post by Torco »

I might have posted this and forgotten but still

puta el weon weon weon. ['pu.tEl wE'On.wE'On.wE.On] altho' the [n] could be /N/ or /M/, I hardly distinguish them in final position.

(lit: prostitute the stupid guy, man)
(trans: shit! how stupid is that guy)

the first is an exclamation, like in 'shit!'

the first 'weon' is a noun, it means a guy
the second is an adjective, it modifies the first 'weon'. I put the emphasis here, when speaking this phrase.
the third is a vocative, a common way to end a sentence in colloquial chilean spanish.

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Post by Avorentión »

The strangest Hungarian phrase may be

Te tetted e tettetett tettet? Tettetett tettek tettese, te!
(Did you do this feigned deed? You doer of feigned deeds!)

(In standard Hungarian all E's are pronounced the same way (ɛ), but in some dialects they can be pronounced differently (ɛ, e, æ) depending on the word.)

Other strange words:
jöjjön (come-SG3-IMP) - 7 dots after each other
hozzáállás (attitude) - 3 double letters after each other
újjáépítéséről (about its reconstruction) - 7 long vowels

Because of the vowel harmony, entire texts can be written using only one vowel in each stanza. Here is an example from the Hungarian band Kárpátia:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1VdSjfvdCg

Nyakas a parasztgazda (Stubborn is the farmer)

Nyakas a parasztgazda, faragatlan fajta.
Kajla bajsza alatt kacag, ha dagad a flaska.
Haj-jaj, ablak alatt dalra fakad, s szakadatlan hajtja,
Ha laza a gatyamadzag, csak kalap van rajta.

Menyecske tehenet fej gyenge len pendelyben,
De pendelye elfeslett, s fedetlen lett keble.
Hej-hej megszeppent erre egy percre, persze ez lett veszte.
Egy fess levente megleste, s menten leteperte.

Iszik kicsit, s így indít biciklizni mindig.
Bíz kicsípik, s viszik is nyírpilisi sittig.
Sír-rí, nincs kis rigli, nincs bilincs, mit civil ki bír nyitni,
Illik ily piciny csínyt így richtig sittig vinni?

Folyton torkos drótostót kosropogóst kóstol.
Potyog most sok olcsó gomb, oly komoly gyomortól.
Ó-hóó, ódon hordóból csobogó jó bort mohón kortyol,
No most gondoskodjon doktor módos koporsóról.


It would be also possible to write a stanza with Ö's.
http://avorenta.uw.hu

Forven, follum il Avorenta missáta pedoné h-errákiri qweren lájch.

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Post by Qwynegold »

Something I read on YouTube:

Knut satt vid en knut och knöt en knut. Då kom Knut som bodde knut-i-knut med Knut och frågade "vad gör du Knut?". "Jag knyter en knut, Knut", sa Knut och så var knuten knuten.

Knut was sitting by the corned of the house and was tieing a knot. Then Knut, who lived next-doors to Knut, came by and asked "what are you doing, Knut?". "I'm tieing a knot, Knut", said Knut and then the knot was tied.
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Post by Mapar »

Dutch fun:

angstschreeuw (scream of fear): eight consonants
aŋstsχreeüw (pronounciation approx.)

hottentottententententoonstelling ('exposition of the Hottentot tents.' Don't ask me what Hottentots are)

de kat krabt de krollen van de trap


This phrase is used to practice the 'rolling' r. In some Dutch dialects, 'r' is pronounced almost like in America, in others (mostly Flemish dialects) like in French, and in yet others it 'rolls'.

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Post by Radagast »

Synnejysk (southern Jutish): ɑː æ uː ɔ ɛ ø i ɛ ɔ "I am out on the island in the river"
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Post by Twpsyn Pentref »

For Latin, there is the famous line of Ennius:

O Tite tute Tati, tibi tanta, tyranne, tulisti.
'O Titus Tatius, thou tyrant, what great troubles you have brought upon yourself!'

And variations upon the old favourite

Malum malo malo, which, depending on how it is scanned and read, can mean any of 'I prefer a(n) [apple/evil/pole] to a(n) [apple/evil/pole].'

Or even

Malam malam malo malo malo.
'I prefer an evil cheek to an evil [apple/pole].'
So take this body at sunset to the great stream whose pulses start in the blue hills, and let these ashes drift from the Long Bridge where only a late gull breaks that deep and populous grave.

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Post by CaesarVincens »

There is also:
Malo malo malo malo
I-rather in-apple-tree than-bad-MASC in-bad-NEUT

With a supplied verb "to be" as is common.
I would rather be in an apple tree than a bad man in adversity.
The only difference is the vowel lengths.

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