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PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 2016 10:07 pm 
Sumerul
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(Most of these resemblances were not planned.)

Janaharian sounds Iranian/Slavic and its grammar is Austronesian/Semitic.

Undreve sounds "Altaic" and has an Afroasiatic/Bantu grammar.

Luworese sounds like some kind of strange Finnic/Nahuan/Austronesian mess and has an as yet ill-defined polysynthetic grammar.

Chavakani sounds Fijian/Japonic and has a somewhat Polynesian/Yoruboid grammar.

Mvithizu sounds Germanic/Bantu and, miraculously, has a somewhat Bantu-like (also somewhat Dyirbal) grammar.

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[ʈʂʰɤŋtɕjɑŋ], or whatever you can comfortably pronounce that's close to that

Formerly known as Primordial Soup

Supporter of use of [ȶ ȡ ȵ ȴ] in transcription

It is pitch black. You are likely to be eaten by a 青.


Last edited by Chengjiang on Tue Nov 01, 2016 3:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 2016 8:04 am 
Smeric
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Khásoitoi/Proto-Kkasetean has a morphology somewhat based on English and Spanish and a syntax somewhat based on Spanish. I added Italian phonemes to Risensi and I plan to base the grammar on "bad" written English.

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ìtsanso, God In The Mountain, may our names inspire the deepest feelings of fear in urkos and all his ilk, for we have saved another man from his lies! I welcome back to the feast hall kal, who will never gamble again! May the eleven gods bless him!
kårroť


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2016 8:25 pm 
Avisaru
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The phonology of Tirina was based on Hawaiian and Japanese, although it's less restrictive than either.

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I generally forget to say, so if it's relevant and I don't mention it--I'm from Southern Michigan and speak Inland North American English. Yes, I have the Northern Cities Vowel Shift; no, I don't have the cot-caught merger; and it is called pop.


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 1:01 pm 
Avisaru
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OK, this is a big one. I'll only do the ones which have had a sizable amount of work put into them: a lot of my languages are begun and then scrapped (I'm sure many of you are like that).

Frislandian: it started out looking an awful lot like Finnish phonologically, however since the revision it is now a bit more like a Western European language like Icelandic, though there are still some weirdnesses such as prenasalised instead of voiced stops, and phonotactics with extremely tight restrictions on initial and final consonants. Over the course of the revision the language has also shifted from an almost entirely suffixing language to one with a few more prefixes (namely Ergative and Oblique marking), a system of theme-markers bearing a resemblance to the ones in PIE (though marking different things) and one or two of the cases have been dropped.

Kaita: this is phonologically Proto-Arapaho-Atsina with Wichita vowels and some intriguing vowel-glide merging. Grammatically it does more of its own thing, and could be said to be a good deal more Iroquoian than Algonquian.

Proto-Muyan: it's a weird one. I wanted a labialless language (I like those), and I wanted to do retroflexes and palatals and only one liquid /l/. When I revised it it gained aspiration, but didn't change very much otherwise. This gives it a bit of an Indo-Aryan feel. the vowels, on the other hand, are a bit like Big Nambas, only there is a length distinction in the front vowels as well. Grammatically it's a bit of hodgepodge, though it is heavily prefixing (even case is attached to the front of a noun) and uses classifiers for numerals and demonstratives. Actually, thinking about it now it might actually come closest to Munda.

Aikuu: well this is probably even weirder than Proto-Muyan. The phonology looks most like Pirahã minus labials and voiced stops, plus another fricative, plus a nasal and a rhotic, with a high-back-unrounded instead of a mid-back-rounded vowel. The grammar is something else entirely: a hierarchically-based agreement with one SAP; verbs which are maximally bi-valent and cannot take obliques; large numbers of serial verbs to make up for the shortfall; marked nominative, with a nominative noun inside a set of serial verbs marking a change of subject to that noun; and some irregular and suppletive imperatives.

Kokanãi: with this I wanted a phonology that looked a bit like Malagasy, but was different enough and "alien" enough to make it feel more like my own. To this end I removed the plain voiced and voiceless prenasalised stops, the voiced fricatives, the labial fricative /f/, /h/, the voiceless trilled affricate, nasals (as separate from prenasalised stops), /l/, changed the alveolar affricates to palatal ones and added the glides /w/ and /j/ and a glottal stop. I also lowered Malagasy's rounded vowel to /o/, and added a three way distinction between short, long and nasal vowels. Inadvertently, the result looks rather Tupian. The grammar bears some resemblances, with an "Austronesian" style voice system, though I've added a reflexive and each verb is inherently either Agent-trigger or Patient-trigger. The verbs also agree with the trigger and one of the "oblique" arguments (actually usually the agent) and there's verbal compounding and noun-incoporation. However, there is also a large number of particles with meanings varying from grammatical (e.g. negative, polar interrogative) to pragmatic(e.g. a particle which indicates the speaker's lower social status relative to the listener) and the determiner system is really something to behold.

I also have an unnamed language which looks like an Australian language minus the retroflexes and the laterals and plus the bilabial trill; Sóttem, a language which blends Ainu and Austronesian (e.g. both a pitch-accent and the velar nasal) while having a few other weird features (e.g. word-initial geminates), tripartite alignment, a ridiculous number of moods which includes a few evidentials, some formality distinctions and more incorporation; and a language I might do up some day and post as a collaborative language-family project called Iri-una, which is my take on Ryukyuan, though the phonology is even more reduced than Oogami.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 1:09 pm 
Smeric
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Frislander wrote:
Kaita: this is phonologically Proto-Arapaho-Atsina with Wichita vowels and some intriguing vowel-glide merging. Grammatically it does more of its own thing, and could be said to be a good deal more Iroquoian than Algonquian.
Is this your Algonquianlang from our collaborative project that we both totally forgot about?

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ìtsanso, God In The Mountain, may our names inspire the deepest feelings of fear in urkos and all his ilk, for we have saved another man from his lies! I welcome back to the feast hall kal, who will never gamble again! May the eleven gods bless him!
kårroť


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2016 3:12 pm 
Avisaru
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mèþru wrote:
Frislander wrote:
Kaita: this is phonologically Proto-Arapaho-Atsina with Wichita vowels and some intriguing vowel-glide merging. Grammatically it does more of its own thing, and could be said to be a good deal more Iroquoian than Algonquian.
Is this your Algonquianlang from our collaborative project that we both totally forgot about?


No, it's on the CBB. My Algo-lang doesn't really "count" in this thread because it's not "inspired by" Algonquian languages, it is an Algonquian language, and that constrains it somewhat.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 12:55 pm 
Sanci
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This looks like fun... Though, Ukumusi and Mupuasa don't truly have much in the way of inspiration, because of how I designed and developed them. I'll leave them out for now.

Ayakadiya has a fairly straightforward inspiration in Sumerian (what little we know of it), at least for the sound system and the phonotactics. I didn't include everything, though -- I removed Sumerian's case system, for the most part, though I kept (a version of) the split ergativity and the really long verbs and agglutination. Overall, I'd say the end product is fairly far removed from the original inspiration, at this point.

Ku Ṣili was a strange little attempt to mimic the sounds of Mon-Khmer languages (especially Khmae, also known as Khmer and Cambodian, which I had some experience with) without ever actually going to a reference grammar and looking at a distribution. Otherwise, Ku Ṣili's main inspiration tended to come entirely from whim decisions designed to be typologically unusual. (I was making it in a typology class for a grade. I am now laughing at my past self.) The pace of the class and the fact that much of it was based on a whim means that Ku Ṣili's needed a revision for some time.

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My conlang family:
  • Ukumusi & Mupuasa -- Two peas in a pod. Tired of your nonsense.
  • Ku Ṣili -- Lonely Misfit. Can't make up its mind.
  • Ayakadiya -- Standoffish, self-important. Needs More Lexicon.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 1:30 pm 
Avisaru
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Yet more inspirations:

Frislandian: The language has changed yet again on revision. The prenasalised stops are now gone, but a couple of new phonemes have been added and there is now strong vowel-reduction. the initial mutations have also been extended to cover alternations in the forms of affixes. The grammar has been slimmed-down a bit: verbs now only conjugate for one argument in a hierarchical fashion, with an old passive serving as a inverse, show stem alternations for aspect, and there are now only four cases. Overall the language if anything is starting to look a bit Saamic.

Ätara: Papuan, particularly Sepik in inspiration. The phonology is very small with 9 consonants with no fricatives, while there are six vowels in an imbalanced system: /i e ə a aː u/. Nouns take PNW-style prenominal clitics when they act as arguments except when they are focused. The language is pretty strongly polysynthetic, with verbs having hierarchical poly-personal marking and markers for a range of categories such as voice (which includes three applicatives), tense, aspect, modality and direction. There are also clitics for evidentiality and negation. However, unlike most Papuan languages the inflection is mostly prefixed and the syntax left-headed.

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