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 Post subject: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2015 4:16 pm 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
I really had fun with the last one, so I think that, whenever I have time, I'll try to add more to the Kebreni lexicon in an inconspicuous fashion by translating clothing terms. Again, I hope my grammar isn't too atrocious.

BELESAUTE HYNNU
Belesao-SUB clothing
Bé Clothing

Beleseu “Beic”
Belesum “Bé, one who lives in Belesao”
Bośaka “cloud” (Meťaiun bočioka “water-sky”)
Bopongu “rain” (Meťaiun bo-pon-gu)
Cezdiru “distract (from work)” (“against-work”)
Daḣc “animal” (Meťaiun dasko, Caďinor dasco)
Dinryr “hardworking, practical” (from diru “work”)
Edana “frond” (from eda “leaf”)
Ede “tree” (from eda “leaf”)
Feru “flood” (Meťaiun fero, related to feiro “bath”)
Ferolesa “jungle” (Meťaiun ferolezio “flood-forest”)
Fortoru “take behind; hide, conceal”
Gemamu “join, merge; braid” (from gem “one”)
Gennyr “only, alone” (from gem “one”)
Hamite “native, aboriginal” (from hami “land”)
Hatnu “pelt, hide” (Meťaiun γatno)
Huar “huar” (from Lé)
Ḣemuris “religion” (Verdurian řemuris)
Ḣesuda “stony; rough” (from ḣeda “stone”)
Kalu “heat” (Meťaiun kalo, Caďinor calo)
Mouva “fur” (augmentative of mova “hair”)
Mycnu “leather” (from mygu “ox)
Naur “nawr ox” (from Lé ŋáɔr)
Neḣagu “body” (Meťaiun neȟadgu)
Nintu “Nyandai” (from Lé Nìntú)
Nivgu “midriff, crotch” (from nivu “middle”)
Oraimur “always” (Meťaiun orand-mor “all hours”)
Rete “daily, usual” (from re “day”)
Syme “fur, expensive” (Ismaîn syme)
Śagau “weather, climate” (from śaga “sky”)
Truka “truca” (from Lé trukà)
*Zeta “arm” (Meťaiun *zeta)
*Zetu “hold, carry” (Meťaiun *zet-)
Zinohu “bring in; invite” (“in-carry”)

Hynnu handyr ḣesuda eupte kanu edanate truka, petay, hadaśuna, huar, eḣc seṫa.
Cloth soft rough away-SUB show frond-SUB truca cotton huar and silk
Fabric: From rough to fine: Truca fronds, petay, cotton, huar, and silk.

Naur ḣyvu pris mycnu ṫaza;
Nawr give healthy leather 3orp
The nawr ox provides good leather;

Kum daḣc ḣyvu mouva eḣc hatnu ṫaza.
Many animal give fur and pelt them
Quite a few animals provide fur and hides.

Śagaute ferolesate Belesum 4.282 pounte Lurite cukate kalu ziunte gisbu immi, biiha hynnu ozegu.
Climate-SUB jungle-SUB Belesao.inhabitant -4.282 below-SUB Luri-SUB point-SUB heat at-SUB humid because/some.DIM cloth wear.INT
The climate in the rain forest of the Bé is hot (averaging around 38° C), and few clothes are necessary.
NOTE: -4.282čcL=38°C. I don't really know if they'd be using the Mihel system; that sounds a little more Kebreni...still, I'll stick to the Lúriei system until somebody tells me otherwise.

Śin neḣatai oraimur sogu rɔ̌nkɔ̀s (iliḣe, ligu-mivgu neziunte). Mâeku (ḣiru, gemaima panźyrau neziunte) zetu rɔ̌nkɔ̀s.
Woman man-BOTH always wear rɔ̌nkɔ̀s (loincloth cover-crotch translate-SUB)/Mâeku (waistband braided-SUB strip translate-SUB) hold rɔ̌nkɔ̀s
The prototypical clothing for adults is a loincloth (Lé rɔ̌nkɔ̀s ‘cover-crotch’) held by a waistband (mâeku ‘braided strip’).

Nyniḣ śenenai sogu fynte, nyne nenai gennyrte sogu mâeku.
Young.girl young.boy-BOTH wear nothing, girl boy-BOTH only-SUB wear mâeku
Young children go naked; slightly older ones wear a mâeku only.

Hamite hynnu kanu;
Native cloth show
The clothes shown are native;

Miry śin temnu śaunte źadana socte maru verdureu ga kebren miźyina oraigu.
Rich woman port around-SUB already wear-SUB want Verdurian or Kebreni bring.in-PART dress
Well-off women in the ports these days may wear imported clothes from Kebri or Verduria.

Gur gente immi hadaśuna ga seṫa maurte hynnu oderu.
Heavy this because cotton or silk probable-SUB cloth acquire-VOL
As these tend to be too heavy, it’s preferred to import cloth, especially cotton and silk.

Ḣir tláerá (sudaida, ḣir-hynnu neziunte) Beleseute ḣimuris, gente eḣc rete hynnu kursu immi kurite.
Long tláerá (robe, long-cloth translate-SUB) Beic-SUB religion this.one and daily cloth differ because thae
L robes (tláerá ‘long-cloth’) are associated with Bé religion, precisely because they are so distinct from everyday wear.

Fortourte neḣagu sudaida zinohu kaam daḣcai.
[Hide-SUB body] robe invite spirit animal-BOTH
Hiding the body, the robes facilitate taking on the roles of spirits and animals.

Mova cezdiru immi śin paźu gente;
Hair distract because woman cut this.one
Typically women wear their hair short (so it doesn’t get in the way of work);

Neḣat lecu dinryir. Neḣatte ḣir mova ḣilu.
Men can practical-less/Man-SUB long hair like
Men are allowed to be less practical, and long hair in men is considered attractive.
NOTE: Literally, “the men’s long hair is liked”.


Last edited by Pedant on Sun Jun 14, 2015 6:46 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Sat Jun 13, 2015 4:25 pm 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
On that note, I have a hunch that there was a Met'aiun word that meant "swamp", as they would have been in the right area and the Cuzeian word (guiscue) doesn't appear to have cognates in other languages, or to be a derivative from Proto-Eastern on its own (though I'll have to check again). I also note the presence of a possible Met'aiun root *gis, possibly meaning "heat" or "warmth" (it has a derivative verb, gisn-, which means "to burn"). Is it possible that there's another word for swamp, *gisȟuwi "heat-giver" maybe?
Which would be *ḣisḣuv or *ḣiśuv in Kebreni...


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 5:33 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
LINNA
Noble
Nobles

Avese “outfit, suit” (Ismaîn avêse “clothing”)
Boluź “heron” (Meťaiun boluji “water-walker”)
*Debur “stork” (Meťaiun *daupor, cognate with Proto-Karazi *dawpor)
Dibru “to choose, decide” (Meťaiun dibru, Caďinor dibreir)
Didaḣ “baby; doll” (Cuêzi ditas)
Gadir “short” (Meťaiun gatiri)
Hanka “hip” (Meťaiun hanka, Caďinor hanca)
Hysunnu “made-of-cloth; outfit” (from hynnu “cloth”)
Idire “tool” (from diru “work”)
Ihere “thing to hang from; hook; noose” (Meťaiun iγiere “hanger”)
Imfaitul “infant” (Caďinor imfantul “child”)
Lenaḣ “pattern” (Cuêzi lēnas “line”)
Lingu “height” (from lim “high”)
Mum “baby” (Meťaiun mumi “suckler”)
Nuita “idea” (Meťaiun nunta, related to nuntsu “think”)
Śaigu “beauty” (Meťaiun čandgu)
*Śuba “crest” (Meťaiun *čuba, cognate with Proto-Karazi *yuba)
*Toṫa “feather” (Meťaiun *toťio)
*Toťo “plume” (related to toťio)
*Zata “shoulder” (Meťaiun *zata)
There are, in this case, a number of words which are completely made up, although I do hope that they conform to Met'aiun structure. These are marked with an *.

Śin sogu seṫate łàorá (śami, źeiga hynnu neziunte; źe rete nezite oraigu). Łàorá lenaḣte huar tlěku (vuḣt gotai ḣiru) zetu.
Woman wear silk-SUB łàorá (shirt fit-PART cloth translate-SUB/also daily word-SUB tunic)/Łàorá pattern-SUB huar tlěku (flat thick-BOTH waistband) hold
The woman wears a silken skirt (łàorá ‘wrapped cloth’, also the general word for clothing) attached to a patterned huar tlěku (flat, wide waistband).

Orat pounte sogu seṫate rɔ̌nkɔ̀s.
All under-SUB wear silk-SUB rɔ̌nkɔ̀s
Underneath she wears a silk rɔ̌nkɔ̀s.

Źe sogu seṫate hàɔsú (śami);
Also wear silk-SUB hàɔsú
She’s wearing a silk blouse (hàɔsú);

Sutnu nuitaai Nintu śadaunte toru, eḣc gente diburte eśte maru.
Name idea-BOTH Nyandai from-SUB take/ and this.one choose-SUB not-VOL-SUB possible
The name and the idea are borrowed from Nyandai, and the item is still optional.
Literally, “this one is probably not chosen”.

Neḣatte avese vekru, kurite ceuste śinte tlěku ceuste vuḣte tlěku gotna sesuṫaai.
Man-SUB outfit similar/that.one despite woman-SUB tlěku opposing his tlěku thick-AUG silk-made.of-BOTH
The man’s outfit is similar, though his tlěku is wider and made of silk.

Sogu soko dyunte munizul lenaḣte iliḣe;
Wear skirt over-SUB fancy pattern-SUB loincloth
He wears a fancy patterned loincloth over the skirt;

Breni miutte sudy nɛ̀rrá (hanka-hynnu).
Style using-SUB call nɛ̀rrá (hip-cloth)
In this position it’s known as a nɛ̀rrá ‘hip-cloth’.

Zata śaunte sogu drùku (ihere-śemangiḣ), gente miutte maru aṫane idire ga imfaitul.
Shoulder using-SUB wear drùku (hanger-cord)/this.one hold-SUB possible weapon tool or infant
Over his shoulder he wears a drùku or hanging-strap, used to hold weapons, tools, or babies.
NOTE: the phrase is literally “around his shoulder”. Also, as this is formal writing, the term imfaitul “infant” is preferred over mum “baby”. Also in common use is didaḣ, which has the additional meaning of “doll”.

Gymu inezu ṫaza sogu elege, kurite ceuste Belesum sudy kalca lingu miutte.
We say-VOL 3p-ORD wear sandal/that.one despite Bé describe shoe height using-SUB
We’d say all these people are wearing sandals, but to the Bé footwear is classified by height.
NOTE: The standard term in Kebreni for shoe is kalca, similar to Verdurian.

Linna sogu prábo, lim bonu neziunte.
Noble wear prábo/high thing translate-SUB
The nobles are wearing prábo, literally ‘high things’.

Gadir mova eḣc dirau egensu, ḣir mova eḣc śaigu egensu immi,
Short hair and work/long hair and beauty same-VOL because
Short hair is associated with work, long with beauty;

Durte mova ceuste miryte mova ḣiur.
Peasant-SUB hair oppose-SUB rich-SUB hair long-AUG
The well-off therefore wear their hair longer than the poor.

Deburte śuba uveira linna miutte.
Stork-SUB crest fashionable noble with-SUB
A Mohawk-like crest is fashionable for noblemen.
NOTE: In this case, what we call a Mohawk the Kebreni associate with plumed storks, quite common to their archipelago.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2015 7:28 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
DUR
Peasant
Peasants

Adase “tool, material” (from tasu “do, make”)
Dyngu “center, source” (from dynu “be over, be at the top”)
Eda “flower (in general) (Meťaiun eteia, Cuêzi etêia)
Hamnu “grass” (from hami “land”)
Hasumi “made from the land; local (material)” (from hami “land”)
Lahi “arrival, destination” (from lahu “come”)
Muate “gender” (Verdurian muatë)
Syḣkur “twisty; twisted”
*Śuda “pig” (Meťaiun *čuta, cognate with Proto-Eastern *ksūta)
Tasgu “tool” (from tasu “do, make”)
Źosu “snake” (Meťaiun joso, from Munkhâshi jotsu)
Same as the last one; words that aren't, in any form, in any corpus known on the main site are given an asterisk. Sorry about that.

Śin neḣatai sogu rɔ̌nkɔ̀s eḣc mâeku.
Woman man-BOTH wear rɔ̌nkɔ̀s and mâeku
Both sexes wear rɔ̌nkɔ̀s and mâeku.

Dyngute kurite aken; śinte mâeku mitu edanate truka, eḣc neḣatte mâeku mitu syḣkur pida.
Source-SUB that.one evident/woman-SUB mâeku use frond-SUB truca/ and man-SUB mâeku use twisty vine
We can see where the latter name comes from, as hers is made of pleated truca fronds, while his is made of twisted vines.

Iliḣe tusa hamite adase hamnu eda haadate źosu ga hatnu zadiunte miutte.
Loincloth make-PERF native material grass leaf rind-SUB snake or hide include-SUB using-SUB
The loincloth itself was traditionally made of local materials, which could even be grass, leaves, snakeskin, or hides.

Źadana miźyina hadaśuna miutte maru;
Already bring.in-PART cotton use-SUB possible
These days imported cotton can be used—

Biiha hadaśuna imetu immi, biiha alat imetu.
Some.DIM cotton need-VOL because/some-DIM money need-VOL
As little is needed, it’s cheap enough.
NOTES: “Because little cloth needs to be used, little money needs to be used.”

Śin sogu drùku;
Woman wear drùku
The woman wears a drùku;

Ṫaḣ ḣiru miutte heurte maru, abaźe zadiunte.
She waistband using-SUB hang-SUB possible knife include-SUB
Her waistband can also be used to hang things from—her knife, for instance.

Eda mova ziunte kanu źaiźiglecsu;
Flower hair in-SUB show marriageable
The flower in her hair shows that she’s unmarried;
NOTE: Kebreni prefer the possible to the unattained, thus she is “marriageable” rather than “unmarried”.

Kaunte mirigu źaiźiiga śin sogu zetu seṫe.
Show-SUB wealth marry-PART woman carry jewel-COLL
Married women wear jewelry to show off their wealth.

Durte leisuta ga trusuka ponyr kalca sudy ŋurbo (vuḣt bonu).
Peasant-SUB wood-made.of or truca-made.of lower sandal call ŋurbo (flat object)
The peasants’ low sandals are ŋurbo ‘flat things’; they’re made of wood or truca.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Mon Jul 13, 2015 1:08 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Last one! Now, what to do next...

BOṪENEU
Soldier
Soldier

*Ak “gray” (Meťaiun aki; also part of Caďinor Iliacos) (Not from a root actually used, but it helps explain the Caďinor...)
Bokyne “Naunai” (Meťaiun bo-kyne “water-moon”; calqued to Caďinor Nounahis)
Ceḣnau “defense” (from ceḣnu “to defend”)
Ereśau “Eretald” (Ismaîn Ereştałde, from Caďinor Aerestaldos)
Ḣiru “belt, (waist)band” (a new meaning has been added)
Koḣu “leather” (Meťaiun koȟo; also produced Caďinor koȟu)
Kyne “moon; month” (Meťaiun kiune, related to kin- “percieve”)
Loźau “mobility” (from loźu “walk”)
Mehem “Eretald (geographical)” (Meťaiun Me-haumi “hon.-land.aug”; originally all the Plain)
Mery “week” (Meťaiun me-riube “hon.-day.aug”)
Miliḣ “battalion, unity” (Meťaiun milgis, Caďinor milgis “unit of 1,000 men”)
Naku “year” (Meťaiun nako, related to nauki “ancient”)
Oguel “arrogant” (Meťaiun oguel, Caďinor orguēl “proud”)
Ogueleu “rogue, highwayman” (from oguel)
Pila “blink” (Meťaiun pila, Caďinor pilea)
Pilu “to blink” (from pila)
Pimali “a shock, surprise” (from pimalu)
Pimalu “to make blink; to shock” (from pila)
Seťora “century” (Meťaiun seγťora, Caďinor secaťora)
Ťerkyne “Iliažë” (Meťaiun ťaurkiune “gold moon”)
Ulen “emphasis” (Verdurian ulën)
Ulenu “emphasize” (Verdurian ulënan)
Veiku “to steal, rob” (Meťaiun wenku “to rob”, Caďinor vencir “to conquer”)
*Virace “Iliacáš moon” (Meťaiun wir-ake “float-gray”; also Caďinor Iriacos, later Iliacos)

Gente eḣc sutnute ciḣica Belesum oguel Nuar gensu.
This and name-SUB praise-PART Lé rogue Ŋar same
This is of course Ŋar, the celebrated Lé rogue.

Leidi jɛ̀ (kosuḣu), syh eḣc źe bugur;
Armor jɛ̀-made.of (leather-made.of) armor/strong and also heavy-not
Her armor is made of jɛ̀, nawr leather— strong and yet quite light;
NOTE: I'm not sure about this sentence; I might revise it...

Gente eḣc nezite leidi gensu.
This.one and word-SUB armor same
The word is also the general one for armor.

Belesaute aṫana ulenu loźau pimaliai immi, gur leidi ebu.
Belesau-SUB army emphasize mobility shock-both because/ heavy armor avoid
Bé armies emphasize mobility and surprise, so heavier armor is avoided.

Syh ceḣnaute ceḣnyr miliḣ sogu héŋjɛ̀ (pocaťanate leidi) ḣiru lidaḣ miutte.
Strong defense-SUB intend-quality battalion wear héŋjɛ̀ (infantry-SUB armor) band steel use-SUB
Units intended for strong defense wear héŋjɛ̀, with added bands of steel.

Gem seťora ziunte boťeneu ozegu Ereśaute leidi.
This century in-SUB soldier wear-VOL Eretald-SUB armor
In the present century it’s become fashionable for soldiers to be outfitted more like those of Eretald.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2015 4:30 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Next up, Xurno!

SURNOTE HYNNU
Xurno-SUB Cloth
Xurnese Clothing

Arelama “Ereláe” (Meťaiun Arelama, Caďinor Aeralameia)
Bezuśau “Bezuxau”
Boťenna “war” (“fight-aug.”)
Endaźue “Endajué”
Gemmur “right now” (“this-hour”)
Gendre “now; still” (“this-day”)
Gendrete “contemporary, modern”
Hynau “weaving”
Iskun “prose” (Verdurian iscun)
Konopra “hemp” (Meťaiun konopria, Caďinor conoplīa)
Meneula “turtle” (Meťaiun “hon.-slow”)
Neśamu “persuade, influence” (“bring through”)
Pugeseś “pucigeseč”
Redreu “ministry” (Verdurian reďreo)
Revaudo “Revaudo”
Samuna “salon” (Xurnese xanumar)
Surnei “Xurnese” (Xurnese Xurney)
Surno “Xurno”
Śagonnyr “common, regular”
Śagonu “to be common, be regular”
Zusei “dzusey” (Xurnese dzusey)

Hynnu: Hadaśuna eḣc konopra śagonnyr hynnuai gensu, źe bihate Arelamate hynnu kete miźynu.
Fabric: Cottona and hemp regular cloth-BOTH same/also anything Ereláe-SUB cloth fast-SUB in.bring
Fabric: The commonest fabrics are still cotton and hemp, but virtually anything found in Ereláe is easily imported.

Gente Revaudote Surnote kur seťora dyunte (Iscunte Boťenna) hynnuai gensu.
This Revaudo-SUB Xurno-SUB two century down-SUB (Prose-SUB War) cloth-BOTH same
The clothes shown are those of Revaudo Xurno two centuries back, the time of the Prose Wars.

Hynau sudy vunute redreu immi, kuum uvere zaru.
Weaving called government-SUB ministry because/many-AUG
As should be expected in a country where weaving is a government ministry, fashions show a bewildering variety.

Tasu gendrete hynnu gem diera eupte, źe Ereśau-SUB uverete neśamau zaru.
Make modern cloth this design away-SUB/also Eretald-SUB fashion-SUB influence exist
Modern clothes still follow the prototypes shown here, but there is more of an influence from the fashions of Eretald.

Bada neḣat śinai puźa mova, źe neḣat puźa śe veťe.
Then man woman-BOTH cut-PERF/also men cut-PERF small beard
At this period the fashion for hair was relatively short for both sexes, and for short trimmed beards for men.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 6:43 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Quick question: in situations in Kebreni where you need both the subordinator -te and the conjunction -ai, which order do they go in, -aite or -tai?


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2015 3:53 pm 
Boardlord
Boardlord

Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2002 8:26 pm
Posts: 10452
Location: In the den
It should be -teai. (-ai only eats the second of two vowels.)


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2015 2:18 pm 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Thanks! Incidentally, I've now reached nearly 220 words of Pseudo-Kebreni! Hooray for pointless exercises!

LELICY
Artist
Artists

Asunai “Axunai” (Xurnese Asunai)
Asunen “Axunašin”
Batyḣ “normal, everyday” (antonym of byḣ)
Byḣ “unusual, strange; miraculous” (Meťaiun beuȟi, related to beiȟa)
Biśikes “Xurnese Academy” (Xurnese Bicikes)
Biśikeseu “Academician”
Breuka “trousers, leggings” (Verdurian bröca)
Budogu “wrongness, falsness” (from budoḣt)
Davaḣeu “engineer”
Dirarei “guild” (calque from Caďinor neron)
Dirareu “(guild) member”
Ektengiḣ “Xengi” (Meťaiun Ektengis, Caďinor Ctengis “Xengi”)
Eneve “waist” (Meťaiun enewe)
Epkanu “look away from, reject” (away-look)
Giliḣ “epoch, era, period” (Meťaiun kilis, Caďinor kilis)
Heipa “tightened, tailored”
Hepiḣ “tight” (Caďinor haupis)
Hepu “to tighten” (back-formation from hepiḣ)
Hyiniḣ “underwear” (calque on Verdurian lanika)
*Ḣaz “knee” (Meťaiun *ȟaz)
Ḣiera “cinched, belted” (from ḣiru “belt”)
Kumaira “split, divided; eccentric” (from kumaru)
Kurgu “variation, difference” (from kursu “to differ”)
Kurisa “varied, different” (from kursu)
Lelicy “artist” (Meťaiun lelikiu, Cuêzi lelîciu “one who has culture”)
Liggu “covering”
Metamu “open in the middle” (“middle-open”)
Neveu “middle-man, middle-class”
Nylu “to wrap” (Caďinor neulen)
Paute “jacket” (Ismaîn pałte “coat”)
Poḣyvu “to allow to inherit, to pass down” (“down-give”)
Raanora “social class” (Verdurian ränora)
Samunar “Salon” (Xurnese xamunar)
Segu “truth” (from seh “true”)
Seh “true” (related to seuγ “strong”)
Siťibu “glaze” (Meťaiun siťibosto “jewel-water”)
Synlyr “shaded, dark; coloured” (from syl “dark”)
Synlyrgu “colour”
Taga “class” (Verdurian tagia)
Taleu “layer” (Verdurian ftaleo, Caďinor ptaleio “covering”)
Toryveu “merchant, trader” (from toryvu)
Trabait “Empire” (Caďinor atrabantos)
Ťeu “Čeiy” (Čeiyu Ṭeô)
Vannyr “ruling, in power” (from vanu “to rule”)
Źaiźiega “spouse (undetermined gender); couple” (from źaizigu “to marry”)
Źaiźigeu “husband”
Źaiźigec “wife”

Źaiziega sudy vannyrte lelicyte raanora.
Couple called ruling-SUB artist-SUB class
The couple shown belong to the ruling artist class.

Neḣatte śinteai avese moitte maru Asunen ewemite avese vekurte;
Man-SUB woman-SUB-BOTH outfit find-SUB possible Axunašin ewemi-SUB outfit like-SUB
Both male and female outfits can be traced back to the Axunašin ewemi;
NOTE: Literally, “Both male and female outfits can be found similar to the Axunašin ewemi’s outfit.”

Budogu fuuste, Surnei lelicy sudy wem.
Wrongess without-SUB / Xurnese artist call wem
Indeed, Xurnese wem is now the word for ‘artist’.

Dierate śinte avese akemanu kum taleute dynyr hynnu.
Design-SUB woman-SUB outfit reveal-VOL many layer-SUB finest cloth
The woman’s outfit is designed to show off multiple layers of fine fabrics.

Ebaun taleu eḣc ḣir seṫa mínuc (sudaida) gensu, gente poḣuvy ewemite sudaida eupte.
Out-AUG layer and long silk mínuc (robe) same / this.one pass.down-PERF ewemi-SUB robe from-SUB
The outermost layer is a long mínuc or robe of imported silk, the direct descendent of ewemi robes.

Oraigu vekurte neḣaguai kamaunte nyila zadiunte kum kurisa uvere zaru.
Dress similar-SUB body-BOTH showing-SUB wrapped include-SUB many different outfit exist
There are many variants, including tight wrapped versions that look more like a dress and show off the figure.

Sogu gen pounte ḣaz zadiunte hadaśunate kúreš (breuka), metaunte múluc (śamiai).
Wear this below-SUB knee include-SUB cotton-SUB kúreš (trousers) mid.open-SUB múluc (blouse-BOTH)
Below this she wears cotton trousers (kúreš) extending not far below the knee, and a cotton blouse (múluc) which doesn’t quite close.

Paiźa gem kamanu hyiniḣ, hyinu komeji (śami, keda-bonu neziunte) eḣc nivo (gadir iliḣe).
Cut-PASS this show underwear / cloth-MIN komeji (blouse, house-thing translate-SUB) and nivo (short loincloth).
These are cut in such a way as to show the underwear: a light blouse (komeji, lit. ‘home-thing’) and short underpants (nivo).

Polte Etak tusa vuḣ immi, śeveḣka sudy etagri.
City-SUB Etak make-PER 3.perj because, stocking call etagri.
Her stockings are etagrú, named for the city of Etak which was an early center for manufacturing them.

Varyrte sogu keyka (gadir pokeḣ) eḣc rebo (midu, Ťeuhen eupte).
Final-SUB wear keyka (short boot) and rebo (scarf, Ṭeôši from-SUB)
Finally she wears a short boot (keyka) as well as a scarf (rebo, a borrowing from Ṭeôši).

Neḣat sogu ḣir lenahte hadaśunate mínuc ḣiera ḣiru miutte eḣc péyšuc (bugur pauto) dyunte.
Man wear long pattern-SUB cotton-SUB mínuc tied belt using-SUB and péyšuc heavy-not jacket) top-SUB
The man wears a long patterned cotton mínuc cinched with a belt, and a light jacket (péyšuc) on top.

Socte nivo pounte maru, kurite ceuste śeveḣka źe sobu eneve śaunte.
Wear-SUB nivo below-SUB possible / that.one oppose-SUB stocking also reach waist surround-SUB
He’s also likely to wear a nivo underneath, though his stockings may also extend to the waist.

Néyuc (handar sype) sudy samunarte dirareite uvere kurite ceuste orat Biśikeseute taga suytte eśu.
Néyuc (soft hat) call Salon-SUB member-SUB style that.one oppose-SUB full Academician-SUB rank call-SUB not
His néyuc or soft cap is of a style that indicates membership in a Salon though not the full status of Academician.

Trabaitte giliḣ bada ḣuli zav lyrai eḣc ty liggu immi, Revaudote muk giliḣ bada ḣuli fuga lyrai synlyrgu eḣc heipa ḣirau.
Empire-SUB era then like-PERF bright colour and round layer because / Revaudo-SUB young era then like-PERF deep sad-BOTH colour and tight line
The early Revaudo period favored rich but somber colors and somewhat severe lines, a reaction to the frivolous bright colors and ballooning layers of the imperial period.

Źe epkuna linna neveuteai raanorate hynnute kurgu, kurite ceuste gente eḣc durte hynnu genuste evuśe.
Also away.look-PERF noble middle.man-SUB-BOTH class-SUB cloth-SUB difference / that.one opppose-SUB this.one and peasant-SUB cloth same-SUB not-VOL-DEF
There was also a tendency to level class distinctions in clothing—distinctions between the middle and upper classes, that is; there was no interest in whatever the peasants were wearing.

Gente immi, Biśikeseu toryveu davaḣeuteai avese egunse, kurite ceuste miryte akemuna raanora dynyr hynnu eḣc taleuna miutte.
This.one because / Academician trader engineer-SUB-BOTH uniform same-VOL-DEF / that.one oppose-SUB rich-SUB show-VOL-DEF class fine cloth and layer-AUG use-SUB
Thus an art student, an Academician, a merchant, and an engineer might all dress about the same (though the wealthy could discreetly show their status with finer fabrics or extra layers).

Sete neḣat śinai batyḣte bukimateai toruvy avese,
True-SUB man woman-BOTH regular-SUB not-crazy-BOTH trade-PERF outfit
For that matter, it wouldn’t be outrageous for the male and female to switch outfits—
NOTES: “For that matter” is “in truth”.

Kurite ceuste neḣat kumairate socte maru breuka.
That.one opppose-SUB man eccentric-SUB wear-SUB possible trousers
Though it would still be somewhat eccentric for men to wear trousers.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2015 2:30 pm 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Um...what I've being doing isn't offending you, is it, Mr. Rosenfelder? Because I can stop if it is.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Sat Aug 08, 2015 2:52 pm 
Boardlord
Boardlord

Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2002 8:26 pm
Posts: 10452
Location: In the den
Not at all. I like to see people using Almean languages (there have been quite a few, they unfortunately don't cluster in time). Just be aware that I may or may not use your coinages. :)


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2015 4:52 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Whew! Thank you for telling me! I think I shall try to find some of these other users of Almean languages...
Just as a curiosity: do Kebreni have family names, as in Verduria? If not, how else might they be marked? From the basic look that Babblers gave of the Monkhayu (whom I'm assuming had a similar structure to that of the original Davurians), it seems as though the extended family (indeed, possibly several) lived together in what seem to be longhouses, keeping animals indoors (though possibly in a separate section?), that men joined (at least in poorer families) the wife's family, and that they shared their wives among themselves, although I'm not entirely sure if this last can be believed, given that Ganacom was the one saying it. How much of this would you say applies to the rest of the Met'aiun?


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Wed Aug 12, 2015 4:30 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Ah, never mind. That's a discussion for another time and place.

DUR
Peasant
Peasants

Mukkyne “New Month, Olašu”
Mohsu “to begin” (Meťaiun mogso, from mog “new”)
Mumakau “modernization”
Mumaku “make new, renew, modernize (new+make)”
Śunsy “to plant, sow” (Meťaiun čuns-)
Tasau “manufacturing” (from tasu “make”)
Vekkanu “consider, see as (as-see)”

Durte avese vekkaunte maru Asunente hynnute mumakau, kurite ceuste neḣadate źem tasau ceuste gendrete tasau riiḣgu eḣc ḣauv.
Peasant-SUB outfit consider-SUB possible Axunemi-SUB cloth-SUB modernization / that.one oppose-SUB people-SUB old manufacture oppose-SUB modern manufacture cost-DIM and good-AUG
Peasant outfits can be considered a modernization of Axunemi clothing, except that modern manufacturing allows cheaper and better clothing for the masses.

Śin sogu hadaśunate múluc (śami), kúreš (breuka), elege, śeveḣka, eḣc nivo,
Woman wear cotton-SUB múluc (shirt) / kúreš (trousers) / sandal / stocking / and nivo
The woman wears a cotton top (múluc) and pants (kúreš), as well as shoes, stockings, and nivo.

Sogu hadaśuna neyúsis (sypiḣ) źe.
Wear cotton neyúsis (cap-DIM) also
She wears a cotton bonnet (neyúsis ‘little cap’).

Neḣat sogu hadaśunate ga konoprate šuac (śami) eḣc źeiga ḣiru miutte konoprate neyreyki (soko), sogu pokeḣ eḣc xauvis (hamnute sype) źe.
Man wear cotton-SUB or hemp-SUB šuac (shirt) and tie-PASS belt use-SUB hemp-SUB neyreyki (skirt) / wear boot and xauvis (grass-SUB hat) also
The man wears a cotton or hemp shirt (šuac) and hempen skirt (neyreyki) tied with a belt, as well as boots and a straw hat (xauvis).

Neḣat śinai socte maru koḣute péyšuc.
Man woman-BOTH wear-SUB possible leather-SUB péyšuc
Either sex might add a leather péyšuc (jacket).


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 12:59 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Last one for Xurno!

BOŤENEU
Soldier
Soldier

Ciḣnu “medal, badge; insignia” (from ciḣcu “praise”)

Boťeneu sogu lidate xauvis (kotnu) eḣc anelota cípex (breuka śamiai, breuka suytte eśu kúreš).
Soldier wear steel-SUB xauvis (helmet) and chainmail cípex (trouser shirt-BOTH / trouser call-SUB not kúreš)
The soldier wears a steel helmet (xauvis) and shirt and trousers of chainmail (cípex— also the term for the trouser layer, so they wouldn’t have to be called kúreš).

Gem dyunte sogu neyreyki eḣc got ťan ga konopra péyšuc.
This over-SUB wear neyreyki and thick wool or hemp péyšuc
Over this he wears a skirt (neyreyki) and a thick woolen or hempen jacket (péyšuc).

Kamanu taga ciḣnu miutte zata dyunte.
Show rank insignia use-SUB shoulder on-SUB
His rank is indicated with shoulder insignia.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 1:48 am 
Boardlord
Boardlord

Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2002 8:26 pm
Posts: 10452
Location: In the den
Pedant wrote:
Just as a curiosity: do Kebreni have family names, as in Verduria? If not, how else might they be marked? From the basic look that Babblers gave of the Monkhayu (whom I'm assuming had a similar structure to that of the original Davurians), it seems as though the extended family (indeed, possibly several) lived together in what seem to be longhouses, keeping animals indoors (though possibly in a separate section?), that men joined (at least in poorer families) the wife's family, and that they shared their wives among themselves, although I'm not entirely sure if this last can be believed, given that Ganacom was the one saying it. How much of this would you say applies to the rest of the Met'aiun?


There's not too much known at this point... however, don't assume the Kebreni are very much like the Met'aiun, any more than that a modern Scot is like a Pict.

And the Monkhayu and Met'aiun were not that close either, though the poor Monkhayu have never got much elaboration. Ganacom is not necessarily lying, but of course he will put facts as badly as possible, and in a way calculated to outrage a Cuzeian. (Plus of course whatever he knows about pre-conquest Monkhayu is by hearsay, as the Munkhashi had no writing.)


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Thu Aug 13, 2015 10:30 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Thank you for the feedback! Unfortunately, now I have a strange image of a Kebreni peasant playing the bagpipes...

Hmm, good point. Actually, that was something I found a little disturbing about that passage. Honestly, I've no idea how a less, well, noble Cuzeian (take Bardāu, or Inibē), assuming they actually were able to talk to Ganacom (and were stuck in a situation where they had to), would react to his arguments. Public piety or not, it's a moment of general uncertainty that I really admired about the book. Flattery aside, I assure you.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 7:20 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Been a while since I've tried out this one...worth a shot, maybe, to get a handle on Uytainese clothing.

UDAITE HYNNU
Uytai-SUB Cloth
Uytainese Clothing

Nakuviḣ “adult” (Meť. Nakuwis, Caď. Nacuis)
Udai “Uytai” (Nyanese Uydai)
Uram “Uyram”
Usii “Uyseʔ”
Vesa “textile” (Verdurian sfesa “bundle”)

Hynnu: Rete vesa kanu hwar (huar, hynśuna vekurte), eḣc (gem ceuste) dynyr hadaśuna (freʔ).
Cloth: usual textile show hwar (huar / flax similar-SUB) / and (this opposing) finest cotton (freʔ)
Fabric: The usual textiles are huar (Uyseʔ hwar), similar to flax, and the slightly finer cotton (freʔ).

Seťa (hon) daga eupte miźynu, hatnu koḣuai źe mitu.
Silk (hon) north from-SUB in.bring / hide leather-BOTH also use
Silk (hon) is imported from the north, and hides and leather are also used.

Uram oraimur sogu rai (soko, źe rete nezite oraigu).
Uyram always wear rai (skirt / also daily word-SUB tunic)
The prototypical clothing of Uytai is a short skirt (rai, also the word for clothes in general).

Śenen nynihai eneve śaunte nylu hynnu, hynnu kete źeucte immi,
Boy girl-BOTH around-SUB wrap cloth waist / cloth easy-SUB refit-SUB because
In childhood these are formed of cloth wrapped around the waist, which allows for easy refitting;

Nakuviḣ sogu źeiga soko.
Adult wear fit-PART skirt
But adults wear fitted skirts.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 3:04 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Another one! And I have now reached two hundred and seventy-seven words of Mock Kebreni. My deepest apologies, Zompist...

LINNA
Noble
Nobles

Ciḣciḣu “to favour, make look good” (Ciḣcu)
Dybnu “relic, artifact; remainder”
Dybu “to leave behind (as a relic) (dy+ebu)
Fatukan “drab, colourless” (Meťaiun fatukan, from Caďinor fucan “colour”)
Gadu “to learn” (Caďinor gadir)
Glen “Gleŋ” (Uyseʔ Glen)
Ḣaa “hem, cuff” (Verd. Řay pisul)
Kaḣku “to save, protect (living)” (Caďinor kascir)
Konnar “priced, on sale” (kona+nC(y)r)
Konte “expensive” (kona plus -te)
Krudiḣ “chest, bosom” (Meťaiun, Caďinor ȟrudis)
Kyźur “ornament, pendant” (Meťaiun *kijur)
Lenanḣyr “patterned”
Loreu “horseman”
Muggu “youth” (muk “young”+gu)
Munḣyr “valuable” (from muḣu “acquire”)
Naśum “barbarian” (Meťaiun munȟačiγumi)
Nekaina “sheer, transparent” (calque on Ver. cellele)
Nivam “Sumë” (Uyseʔ Nyuam)
Pevu “to shape, style” (Meťaiun pewo, Caďinor pevir)
Popoc “sole (of shoe)” (calque on Verdurian hipnaga)
Sannu “official” (Caďinor sanno “lord”)
Sekaťora “century” (Meťaiun sekaťora, Caďinor secaťora)
Śemanu “to shrink”
Śenu “to be small” (Meťaiun čauno, related to čau “small”)
Tazguna “habit” (tazgu+aug.)
Telnileḣ “valuable” (Caďinor telniles)
Vemaru “to endanger”
Venku “to win, conquer” (Caďinor vencir)
Ver “dangerous’ (Meťaiun waur, Caďinor vaures)
Yviraḣ “greed” (Meťaiun iuwiras, Cuêzi yēvīras)
Yviranḣyr “greedy”
Zadav “simple” (Meťaiun zatawi “not bright, dull”)
Zadavgu “simplicity”
Źore “safe” (Verdurian žore)
Źuvam “Čwam” (Nyanese *Dzwam, Uyseʔ Tsuam)

Nyne sogu seťate ḣaa miutte hadaśunate hler (ḣir sudaida),
Woman wear silk-SUB hem with-SUB cotton-SUB hler (long robe)
The woman wears a long, silk-hemmed cotton robe (hler);

Prinenar (nekaina hynnu) miryte ruḣi, tante śylnu gente tuma mirigu mugguai źe.
Prinenar (transparent cloth) rich-SUB cost-PERF / show-SUB breast that-one show-PERF wealth young-both too
Sheer cloth (prinenar) was expensive, thus a sign of wealth, while baring a breast was a sign of both wealth and youth,

Kuri uvere ciḣciuḣte uśe źem ga kona fuuste neḣat.
That style favour-SUB not-PERF old or money without-SUB human
As it was a fashion that did not much favour the old or poor.

Gente pounte sogu nyila seťate tsutho (śamiḣi hynnu neziunte).
That.one under-SUB wear wrap-PART silk-SUB tsutho (near+dim. cloth translate-SUB)
Underneath is a wrapped silk undergarment (tsutho, ’little near (cloth)’).

Nyne sogu ťerute hakte-munḣyr seťteai hyause (krudiḣte kyźur).
Woman wear gold-SUB almost-valuable jewel-SUB-BOTH hyause (chest-SUB ornament)
She wears a hyause or chest ornament of gold and semiprecious stones.

Mova pauśte uśe, kurite ceuste mova lecte puve.
Hair cut-SUB not-PERF / this.one oppose-SUB hair able-SUB style-PERF
Her hair is worn long, though carefully styled.

Neḣat sogu koḣute zadav paute, someʔ neziunte, Nivam eupte, taisa naśunte palte vekurte immi
Man wear leather-SUB simple jacket / someʔ translate-SUB / Sumë from-SUB / make-PASS barbarian-SUB coat like-SUB because
The man wears a simple leather jacket, called a someʔ, literally a Sumë, as it was modeled after similar coats worn by those barbarians.

Zadavgu ḣir tazgunate dybnu,
Simplicity long habit-SUB relic
Its simplicity is the relic of an old habit:

Glente venkeu kur kram hakeḣ sekaťora neufte yviranḣyrna immi, taima miriukte zen vemura Uram,
Gleŋ-SUB conqueror two ten five-ORD century during-SUB greedy-AUG because / open-PASS wealth-SUB sign endanger-PERF Uyram
The Gleŋ conquerors of the 2500s were so rapacious that outward signs of wealth were dangerous—

Miry guda sogu fatukan durte palte ga loreute palte pokeḣai, źorete kamuna riḣgute avese keda ziunte.
Rich learn-PERF wear drab peasant-SUB coat or horseman-SUB coat boot-BOTH / safe-SUB reveal-PERF price-SUB outfit house in-SUB
Rich men learned to go about in drab peasants’ cloaks or in horsemen’s jackets and boots, revealing their sumptuous outfits only when safe at home.

Myga naku neufte palte śemuna eḣc gemeḣ bryunte biuha mirigu kamanu.
Thousand year during-SUB jacket shrink-PERF and first glance-SUB some-AUG wealth show
A millennium has shrunk the jackets and allowed more luxury to appear at first glance.

Palte pounte sogu lenanḣyr hadaśunate hyausu (śami, dyhynnu neziunte) eḣc got hadaśunate tsuamsu (breuka, tomo eupte avese miźuny immi, Źuvante hynnu nezinu)
Jacket under-SUB wear patterned cotton-SUB hyausu (shirt / over-cloth translate-SUB) and thick cotton-SUB tsuamsu (trousers / there from-SUB style bring-PERF because / Čwam-SUB cloth translate)
Under the jacket he wears a patterned cotton shirt (hyausu ‘overcloth’) and thick cotton trousers (tsuamsu ‘Čwamese cloth’, as the style originated there).

Lim handar khew (sype) kamanu ťaḣ vuunte sannu.
Large soft sype (hat) show 3sORD government-SUB
His large soft hat (khew) marks him as a government official.
NOTE: given that it’s a lord, the translator (or writer) should apply the deferential pronoun; however, given that it’s an Uyram, he or she probably feels as though they and the Kebreni are on equal terms.

Neḣat śinai sogu hynnute dyvan koḣute popocai miutte (gente tamu mirigu źe) dynyr thau (kalca).
Man woman-BOTH wear cloth-SUB upper leather-SUB sole-BOTH with-SUB (this.one show wealth also) finest thau (shoe)
Both wear fine shoes (thau), with cloth uppers and hard leather soles, both again being badges of wealth.

Pruym (pokeḣ) ziman ziunte sogu.
Pruym (boot) ground on-SUB wear
Heavier shoes or boots (pruym) are worn outdoors.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Tue Jun 21, 2016 7:38 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Funny, most of the words I actually had this time...

DUR
Peasant
Peasants

Dyzetu “lift (off), remove (upwards)” (dy+*zetu)
Mami “nursing, suckling, breastfeeding” (from mamu)
Mumaku “make new, renew, innovate” (from muk)
Salśeze “moccasin, slipper” (Ismaîn şalçeȥe)
Śimet “poncho” (Meťaiun čimet, Munkhâshi shmet)
Ťatan “easy” (Meťaiun ťatani “not-harmful”)
Yknur “thread” (Caďinor cnur)
Yknurte “threaded, fringed”

Eneve dyunte soupte eḣc śemangiḣ miutte heipa gadir huarte rai, eḣc gadir yknurte nyaisu (śylnu-hynnu neziunte) śin sogu. Hynnu ťatante tasu eḣc mami neufte ťatante dyzetu.
[Waist above-SUB extend-SUB and cord with-SUB tightened-PASS] short huar-SUB rai / and short fringed nyaisu (breast-cloth translate-SUB) woman wear / cloth easy-SUB make and nursing during-SUB easy-SUB remove
The woman wears a short huar rai which reaches well above the waist, and is tightened by cords, and a very short fringed top (nyaisu ‘breast-cloth’), both easily made and easily removed for nursing.

Ḣir mova ťiba fourte źeiga sogu.
Long hair [head behind-SUB tie-PASS] wear.
Her hair is long, but worn tied up in the back.

Neḣat sogu huarte zadav rai eḣc hyausu.
Man wear huar-SUB simple and hyausu
The man wears a simple huar rai and hyausu.

Linnate kalca ceuste salśeze vekurte kalca handar koḣuai gensu, gente sudy ħrit.
[Noble-SUB shoe oppose-SUB slipper alike-SUB] shoe soft leather-BOTH same / this.one name ħrit
His footwear is soft leather, more like moccasins than the nobles’ shoes, and thus has a different name— ħrit.

Nengarau dyunte linnate avese durte aveseai gunse, breuka eḣc paute mumuka.
Ancient-NOM up-SUB noble-SUB outfit peasant outfit-BOTH same-PERF / trousers and jacket innovate-PERF
In ancient times noblemen’s outfits looked much more like the peasants’ (i.e. trousers and jackets are innovations).

Ric śagau neufte sogu śimet vekurte huarte ga koḣu hyautsur (palte, zata-dyunte neziunte).
Cold weather during-SUB wear [poncho like-SUB] huar-SUB or leather hyautsur (coat / shoulder-over-SUB translate-SUB)
In cold weather one puts on a poncho-like huar or leather cloak (hyautsur ‘over-shoulder’).


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Sat Jul 02, 2016 9:26 am 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Now, what to do after this...

BOŤENEU
Solider
Soldier

Beźa “movement, flexibility” (Verdurian bežia)
Bukontau “cheapness” (from bukonte)
Bukonte “cheap” (from konte)
Cisu “slide” (Meťaiun kis-, Caďinor cisir)
Krit “plate (of metal)” (Caďinor kritos)
Nyvnu “arrow” (Meťaiun nuwno, from nuw- “throw”)
Nyvseu “archer”
Nyvsu “to shoot” (Meťaiun nuwso)
Pośoś “padding, stuffing” (Verdurian pošoš)
Soggu “wear, thing worn (not normal clothes)” (sogu+abstract)
Symahu “reinforce, strengthen” (from syh)
Unuvse “bow”
Źeheu “rider, cavalry”

Aťanate zateveu nyvseu ga źeheuai gunse immi, Udaite swiʔnyim (leidi, mardaḣ-soggu neziunte) oradam ziunte guur eḣc kounte leidiai gensu,
[Army-SUB enemy archer or cavalry-BOTH same-PERF] because/ Uytai-SUB swiʔnyim (armor / iron-wear translate-SUB) [world in-SUB] heavy-AUG and expensive-AUG armor-BOTH
Uytainese armor (swiʔnyim ‘ironwear’) is some of the heaviest— and most expensive— in current use on Almea, largely because it evolved as the defensive gear of a standing army, whose enemies were normally archers or in recent centuries cavalry;

Loźau bukontauai miutte uśe.
Mobility cheapness-BOTH use-SUB not-PERF
Thus there was little premium on mobility or cheapness.

Kurite ceuste Uram imute beźa immi, leidi tasu lidaḣte ciste krit.
That.one oppose-SUB Uyram want-VOL.PERF flexibility because / armour make steel-SUB slide-SUB plate
Nonetheless the Uytainese desired a certain flexibility, and thus the armor is largely constructed of sliding steel plates.

Leidi pounte sogu śami eḣc breuka, gente symahu koḣu miutte eḣc kugumy hadaśunate pośoś.
Armour under-SUB wear shirt and trousers / this.one reinforce leather use-SUB and fill cotton-SUB padding
Underneath his armor he wears a shirt and trousers, reinforced with leather and stuffed with cotton padding.


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 Post subject: Re: Oradante Hynnu
PostPosted: Sun Jul 03, 2016 11:37 pm 
Lebom
Lebom

Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2015 5:50 am
Posts: 149
Okay, so I'm probably not going to be doing one of these for a while; no more plagiarism, Zompist, I promise. As a grand finale, however, I give you all 297 words of Mock Kebreni!

Aan “Iáinos” (Meť. Ain)
Adase “tool, material” (from tasu “do, make”)
*Ac “gray” (Meťaiun aki; also part of Caďinor Iliacos)
Anelota “chain-mail” (Verdurian)
Arelama “Ereláe” (Meťaiun Arelama, Caďinor Aeralameia)
Asunai “Axunai” (Xurnese Asunai)
Asunen “Axunašin”
Avese “outfit, suit” (Ismaîn avêse “clothing”)
Azave “star” (from zavi “to shine”)
Batyḣ “normal, everyday” (antonym of byḣ)
Bedel “portrait” (Verdurian behdel)
Beleseu “Beic”
Belesum “Bé, one who lives in Belesao”
Bezuśau “Bezuxau”
Beźa “movement, flexibility” (Verdurian bežia)
Biśikes “Xurnese Academy” (Xurnese Bicikes)
Biśikeseu “Academician”
Bokyne “Naunai” (Meťaiun bo-kyne “water-moon”; calqued to Caďinor Nounahis)
Boluź “heron” (Meťaiun boluji “water-walker”)
Bopongu “rain” (Meťaiun bo-pon-gu)
Bośaka “cloud” (Meťaiun bočioka “water-sky”)
Boťenna “war” (“fight-aug.”)
Breni “thing looked at; style, type”
Breuka “trousers, leggings” (Verdurian bröca)
Budogu “wrongness, falsness” (from budoḣt)
Bukontau “cheapness” (from bukonte)
Bukonte “cheap” (from konte)
Byḣ “unusual, strange; miraculous” (Meťaiun beuȟi, related to beiȟa)
Ceḣnau “defense” (from ceḣnu “to defend”)
Cezdiru “distract (from work)” (“against-work”)
Ciḣciḣu “to favour, make look good” (Ciḣcu)
Ciḣnu “medal, badge; insignia” (from ciḣcu “praise”)
Cisu “slide” (Meťaiun kis-, Caďinor cisir)
Cuka kalu “degree of heat” (Verdurian čuka calo)
Daḣc “animal” (Meťaiun dasko, Caďinor dasco)
Davaḣeu “engineer”
*Debur “stork” (Meťaiun *daupor, cognate with Proto-Karazi *dawpor)
Dibru “to choose, decide” (Meťaiun dibru, Caďinor dibreir)
Didaḣ “baby; doll” (Cuêzi ditas)
Diera “[thing] worked on, design” (from diru “work”)
Dinryr “hardworking, practical” (from diru “work”)
Dirarei “guild” (calque from Caďinor neron)
Dirareu “(guild) member”
Dur “worker, peasant” (Meťaiun duri)
Dybnu “relic, artifact; remainder”
Dybu “to leave behind (as a relic) (dy+ebu)
Dyngu “center, source” (from dynu “be over, be at the top”)
Dynlignu “headcover” (Meťaiun diunlignu “top-cover tool”)
Dynneḣat “head” (Meťaiun diunneȟad “top-man”)
Dyzetu “lift (off), remove (upwards)” (dy+*zetu)
Ebgoru (Meťaiun epgoru “to move away from thickness”)
Edana “frond” (from eda “leaf”)
Eda “flower (in general) (Meťaiun eteia, Cuêzi etêia)
Ede “tree” (from eda “leaf”)
Eḣpikeḣ “bulky” (Caďinor espices “thick”)
Ektengiḣ “Xengi” (Meťaiun Ektengis, Caďinor Ctengis “Xengi”)
Elege “shoe, sandal” (from legu “cover a small part”)
Endaźue “Endajué”
Eneve “waist” (Meťaiun enewe)
Epkanu “look away from, reject” (away-look)
Ereśau “Eretald” (Ismaîn Ereştałde, from Caďinor Aerestaldos)
Falaḣ “private” (Caďinor falaȟ “soldier”)
Fatukan “drab, colourless” (Meťaiun fatukan, from Caďinor fucan “colour”)
Febu “paint” (Caďinor fauban, Meťaiun faubu)
Ferolesa “jungle” (Meťaiun ferolezio “flood-forest”)
Feru “flood” (Meťaiun fero, related to feiro “bath”)
Fevgu “picture” (from febu “paint”)
Fortoru “take behind; hide, conceal”
Gadir “short” (Meťaiun gatiri)
Gadod “thin, narrow” (Meťaiun gatodri “not-thick”)
Gadu “to learn” (Caďinor gadir)
Gemamu “join, merge; braid” (from gem “one”)
Gemmur “right now” (“this-hour”)
Gendre “now; still” (“this-day”)
Gendrete “contemporary, modern”
Gennyr “only, alone” (from gem “one”)
Giliḣ “epoch, era, period” (Meťaiun kilis, Caďinor kilis)
Gisbu “humidity; melt, be humid” (Meťaiun gis-bo)
Glen “Gleŋ” (Uyseʔ Glen
Hadaśuna “cotton” (Meťaiun γatačuna “skin-plant”)
Hamite “native, aboriginal” (from hami “land”)
Hamnu “grass” (from hami “land”)
Handar “soft, skinlike” (from hada “skin”)
Hanka “hip” (Meťaiun hanka, Caďinor hanca)
Hasumi “made from the land; local (material)” (from hami “land”)
Hatnu “pelt, hide” (Meťaiun γatno)
*Ḣaz “knee” (Meťaiun *ȟaz)
Heipa “tightened, tailored”
Hepiḣ “tight” (Caďinor haupis)
Hepu “to tighten” (back-formation from hepiḣ)
Huar “huar” (from Lé)
Hyina “linen” (Meťaiun γeuina)
Hyiniḣ “underwear” (calque on Verdurian lanika)
Hynau “weaving”
Hynśuna “flax, linen” (Meťaiun γeunčuna “weaving plant”)
Hysunnu “made-of-cloth; outfit” (from hynnu “cloth”)
Ḣaa “hem, cuff” (Verd. Řay pisul)
Ḣemuris “religion” (Verdurian řemuris)
Ḣesuda “stony; rough” (from ḣeda “stone”)
Ḣiera “cinched, belted” (from ḣiru “belt”)
Ḣirau “line” (Meťaiun giradio “long thing”)
Ḣiru “belt, (waist)band”
Ḣuv “giver” (from Meť. ȟuwi)
Idire “tool” (from diru “work”)
Ihere “thing to hang from; hook; noose” (Meťaiun iγiere “hanger”)
Ilaan “Eīledan” (Meť. Eiladan, from Cuêzi Eīledan)
Imfaitul “infant” (Caďinor imfantul “child”)
Iskun “prose” (Verdurian iscun)
Kaḣku “to save, protect (living)” (Caďinor kascir)
Kalca “shoe” (Meťaiun kalkio, Caďinor calceio)
Kalu “heat” (Meťaiun kalo, Caďinor calo)
Kamanu “reveal” (from kanu “see”)
Keguh “flash” (Meťaiun koigoγ “quick-fire”)
Keguhy “to flash, flicker” (back-derivation from keguh)
Koḣu “leather” (Meťaiun koȟo; also produced Caďinor koȟu)
Konnar “priced, on sale” (kona+nC(y)r)
Konopra “hemp” (Meťaiun konopria, Caďinor conoplīa)
Konte “expensive” (kona plus -te)
Kotnu “shell; helmet” (Meťaiun kot-no “snail-object”)
Krit “plate (of metal)” (Caďinor kritos)
Krudiḣ “chest, bosom” (Meťaiun, Caďinor ȟrudis)
Kumaira “split, divided; eccentric” (from kumaru)
Kurgu “variation, difference” (from kursu “to differ”)
Kurisa “varied, different” (from kursu)
Kyne “moon; month” (Meťaiun kiune, related to kin- “percieve”)
Kyźur “ornament, pendant” (Meťaiun *kijur)
Lahi “arrival, destination” (from lahu “come”)
Lanil “linen” (Ismain lânile)
Legu “cover a small part” (Meťaiun lieg)
Leidi “armor” (Meťaiun leidi “wood-collective”, from leita “wood”)
Lelicy “artist” (Meťaiun lelikiu, Cuêzi lelîciu “one who has culture”)
Lenaḣ “pattern” (Cuêzi lēnas “line”)
Lenanḣyr “patterned”
Liggu “covering”
Lingu “height” (from lim “high”)
Loreu “horseman”
Loźau “mobility” (from loźu “walk”)
Luri “degree Lúriei” (derivation unknown)
Mami “nursing, suckling, breastfeeding” (from mamu)
Mehem “Eretald (geographical)” (Meťaiun Me-haumi “hon.-land.aug”; originally all the Plain)
Meneula “turtle” (Meťaiun “hon.-slow”)
Mery “week” (Meťaiun me-riube “hon.-day.aug”)
Metamu “open in the middle” (“middle-open”)
Miliḣ “battalion, unity” (Meťaiun milgis, Caďinor milgis “unit of 1,000 men”)
Miźengu “rope” (Meťaiun miejengu)
Mohsu “to begin” (Meťaiun mogso, from mog “new”)
Mouva “fur” (augmentative of mova “hair”)
Muate “gender” (Verdurian muatë)
Muggu “youth” (muk “young”+gu)
Mukkyne “New Month, Olašu”
Mum “baby” (Meťaiun mumi “suckler”)
Mumakau “modernization”
Mumaku “make new, renew, modernize, innovate” (from muk)
Munḣyr “valuable” (from muḣu “acquire”)
Munizul “fancy” (Verdurian)
Mycnu “leather” (from mygu “ox)
Naku “year” (Meťaiun nako, related to nauki “ancient”)
Nakuviḣ “adult” (Meť. Nakuwis, Caď. Nacuis)
Naśum “barbarian” (Meťaiun munȟačiγumi)
Naur “nawr ox” (from Lé ŋáɔr)
Neḣagu “body” (Meťaiun neȟadgu)
Nekaina “sheer, transparent” (calque on Ver. cellele)
Neśamu “persuade, influence” (“bring through”)
Neveu “middle-man, middle-class”
Nevnu “heart” (Meť. Newno)
Nezinu “translate” (calque from Verdurian celmetan “between-put”; here “through-put”)
Nintu “Nyandai” (from Lé Nìntú)
Nivam “Sumë” (Uyseʔ Nyuam)
Nivgu “midriff, crotch” (from nivu “middle”)
Nuita “idea” (Meťaiun nunta, related to nuntsu “think”)
Nuny “be young; be born, originate; give birth” (Meťaiun, same root as nen and nyne)
Nylu “to wrap” (Caďinor neulen)
Nyvnu “arrow” (Meťaiun nuwno, from nuw- “throw”)
Nyvseu “archer”
Nyvsu “to shoot” (Meťaiun nuwso)
Oguel “arrogant” (Meťaiun oguel, Caďinor orguēl “proud”)
Ogueleu “rogue, highwayman” (from oguel)
Oraimur “always” (Meťaiun orand-mor “all hours”)
Paiźa “cut, slit” (from paźu “cut”)
Palte “coat, vest” (Ismaîn pałte)
Paute “jacket” (Ismaîn pałte “coat”)
Panźyrau “strip, cutting, piece” (from paźu “cut”)
Pevu “to shape, style” (Meťaiun pewo, Caďinor pevir)
Pila “blink” (Meťaiun pila, Caďinor pilea)
Pilu “to blink” (from pila)
Pimali “a shock, surprise” (from pimalu)
Pimalu “to make blink; to shock” (from pila)
Pliku “copy, imitate” (Meťaiun pliku, Caďinor plican)
Pocaťana “infantry” [I might discard this for a simpler aťana at some point]
Poḣyvu “to allow to inherit, to pass down” (“down-give”)
Pokeḣ “boot” (Meťaiun pokeȟ “foot-nom.”)
Ponau “under-object; hole” (from ponu “under”)
Popoc “sole (of shoe)” (calque on Verdurian hipnaga)
Pośoś “padding, stuffing” (Verdurian pošoš)
Pugeseś “pucigeseč”
Raanora “social class” (Verdurian ränora)
Redreu “ministry” (Verdurian reďreo)
Rete “daily, usual” (from re “day”)
Revaudo “Revaudo”
Rug “horn” (Caďinor rogos; replaced Meťaiun)
Salśeze “moccasin, slipper” (Ismaîn şalçeȥe)
Sam “bright, holy” (Cuêzi same)
Samunar “Salon” (Xurnese xamunar)
Sannu “official” (Caďinor sanno “lord”)
Satul “bright” (from siul “dark”)
Satulau “brightness”
Sca “neck” (Meťaiun skia, Caďinor sceia)
Segu “truth” (from seh “true”)
Seh “true” (related to seuγ “strong”)
Sekaťora “century” (Meťaiun sekaťora, Caďinor secaťora)
Seťora “century” (Meťaiun seγťora, Caďinor secaťora)
Siťibu “glaze” (Meťaiun siťibosto “jewel-water”)
Soggu “wear, thing worn (not normal clothes)” (sogu+abstract)
Soiga “worn, worn-out” (from sogu “wear”)
Sudaida “robe” (Caďinor sutanda)
Surnei “Xurnese” (Xurnese Xurney)
Surno “Xurno”
Syḣkur “twisty; twisted”
Symahu “reinforce, strengthen” (from syh)
Syme “fur, expensive” (Ismaîn syme)
Synlyr “shaded, dark; coloured” (from syl “dark”)
Synlyrgu “colour”
Sype “hat” (Ismain sype)
Śagau “weather, climate” (from śaga “sky”)
Śagonnyr “common, regular”
Śagonu “to be common, be regular”
Śaigu “beauty” (Meťaiun čandgu)
Śami “shirt, blouse” (Ismain şami)
Śemangiḣ “rope, cord” (see śemangu)
Śemangu “[fishing] net” (from śemamu “to fish”)
Śemanu “to shrink”
Śenu “to be small” (Meťaiun čauno, related to čau “small”)
Śeuś “collar, helm” (Verdurian šeyoš)
Śimet “poncho” (Meťaiun čimet, Munkhâshi shmet)
*Śuba “crest” (Meťaiun *čuba, cognate with Proto-Karazi *yuba)
*Śuda “pig” (Meťaiun *čuta, cognate with Proto-Eastern *ksūta)
Śunsy “to plant, sow” (Meťaiun čuns-)
Taga “class” (Verdurian tagia)
Taleu “layer” (Verdurian ftaleo, Caďinor ptaleio “covering”)
Tasau “manufacturing” (from tasu “make”)
Tasgu “tool” (from tasu “do, make”)
Tazguna “habit” (tazgu+aug.)
Telnileḣ “valuable” (Caďinor telniles)
Toryveu “merchant, trader” (from toryvu)
*Toťa “feather” (Meťaiun *toťio)
*Toťo “plume” (related to toťa)
Trabait “Empire” (Caďinor atrabantos)
Truka “truca” (from Lé trukà)
Turau “brotherhood”
Ťan “wool” (Caďinor ďannos)
Ťannyr “velvet” (having the quality of ťan)
Ťatan “easy” (Meťaiun ťatani “not-harmful”)
Ťerkyne “Iliažë” (Meťaiun ťaurkiune “gold moon”)
Ťeu “Čeiy” (Čeiyu Ṭeô)
Udai “Uytai” (Nyanese Uydai)
Ugur “squash, cucumber” (Caďinor ugor “squash”)
Ulen “emphasis” (Verdurian ulën)
Ulenu “emphasize” (Verdurian ulënan)
Ulone “Ulōne”
Unuvse “bow”
Uram “Uyram”
Usii “Uyseʔ”
Vanau “governance, office” (from vanu “govern”)
Vannyr “ruling, in power” (from vanu “to rule”)
Veiku “to steal, rob” (Meťaiun wenku “to rob”, Caďinor vencir “to conquer”)
Vekkanu “consider, see as (as-see)”
Vekrugu “appearance, representation; assumed form” (From Meťaiun veȟkrugo)
Vemaru “to endanger”
Venku “to win, conquer” (Caďinor vencir)
Ver “dangerous’ (Meťaiun waur, Caďinor vaures)
Vesa “textile” (Verdurian sfesa “bundle”)
*Virace “Iliacáš moon” (Meťaiun wiri-ake “float-gray”; also Caďinor Iriacos, later Iliacos)
Yknur “thread” (Caďinor cnur)
Yknurte “threaded, fringed”
Yviraḣ “greed” (Meťaiun iuwiras, Cuêzi yēvīras)
Yviranḣyr “greedy”
Zadav “simple” (Meťaiun zatawi “not bright, dull”)
Zadavgu “simplicity”
*Zata “shoulder” (Meťaiun *zata)
Zen “sign, symbol” (Caďinor zennos)
*Zeta “arm” (Meťaiun *zeta)
*Zetu “hold, carry” (Meťaiun *zet-)
Zinohu “bring in; invite” (“in-carry”)
Zinu “be in, on; put/place in, on”
Zun “year” (Meťaiun zon, Caďinor zonnos)
Zusei “dzusey” (Xurnese dzusey)
Źaiźiega “spouse (undetermined gender); couple” (from źaizigu “to marry”)
Źaiźigeu “husband”
Źaiźigec “wife”
Źany “kind, category” (Meť. jianiu)
Źegu “tie, tighten; fit” (Meť. jeku, same root as źega)
Źeheu “rider, cavalry”
Źeknu “chain” (Meťaiun jekno “link-object”)
Źenno “leg” (Meťaiun jenno)
Źore “safe” (Verdurian žore)
Źosu “snake” (Meťaiun joso, from Munkhâshi jotsu)
Źuvam “Čwam” (Nyanese *Dzwam)


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