zompist bboard

WE ARE MOVING - see Ephemera
It is currently Fri Oct 19, 2018 12:49 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4309 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sun Jul 30, 2017 10:42 pm 
Sumerul
Sumerul

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 12:47 pm
Posts: 3581
Location: Milwaukee, US
din wrote:
next: magnet (or magnetic)


'magnetic' (lit. 'pulling'):

3rd sg. m.: tšüwyodə
3rd sg. f.: tšüwyode
3rd pl. m.: tšüwyodəm
3rd pl. f.: tšüwyodem

next: 'enlightening'

_________________
Dibotahamdn duthma jallni agaynni ra hgitn lakrhmi.
Amuhawr jalla vowa vta hlakrhi hdm duthmi xaja.
Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro.


Last edited by Travis B. on Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:57 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 6:16 am 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2004 4:31 pm
Posts: 1733
Location: 가매
Travis B. wrote:
next: enlightening

Kala:

sato /saːto/ - sense; perceive; be aware of; detect
satomya /satoːmʲa/ - to cause awareness; cause perception
satonko /satoːᵑko/ - awareness; sensing; enlightening

next: to feel sorry for someone; to pity a person

_________________
Kala blog | Kala grammar | IPA keyboard
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:27 am 
Sumerul
Sumerul

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 12:47 pm
Posts: 3581
Location: Milwaukee, US
masako wrote:
next: to feel sorry for someone; to pity a person


'pity':

3rd sg. m. ipfv. non-past: tsawə
3rd sg, f. ipfv. non-past: tsəwin
3rd pl. m. ipfv. non-past: tsəwu
3rd pl. f. ipfv. non-past: tsorå
3rd sg. m. ipfv. past: tsotwə
3rd sg. f. ipfv. past: tsotwen
3rd pl. m. ipfv. past: tsotwu
3rd pl. f. ipfv. past: tsotorå
3rd sg. m. pfv. past: tsolyə
3rd sg. f. pfv. past: tsolyen
3rd pl. m. pfv. past: tsolwu
3rd pl. f. pfv. past: tsolrå
3rd sg. m. pfv. non-past: tsolåyyə
3rd sg. f. pfv. non-past: tsoləyyin
3rd pl. m. pfv. non-past: tsoləyyu
3rd pl. f. pfv. non-past: tsoləyrå
3rd sg. m. ipfv. non-past, 3rd sg. m. obj.: tsawwə
3rd sg. m. ipfv. non-past, 3rd sg. f. obj.: tsəwri
3rd sg. m. ipfv. non-past, 3rd pl. m. obj.: tsawwo
3rd sg. m. ipfv. non-past, 3rd pl. f. obj.: tsəwxå
3rd sg. f. ipfv. non-past, 3rd sg. m. obj.: tsəwinwə
3rd sg. f. ipfv. non-past, 3rd sg. f. obj.: tsəwinri
3rd sg. f. ipfv. non-past, 3rd pl. m. obj.: tsawno
3rd sg. f. ipfv. non-past, 3rd pl. f. obj.: tsəwinxå

(I was going to write out the above, again, for all combinations of 3rd person subjects and objects, but couldn't be bothered.)

next: 'harvest'

_________________
Dibotahamdn duthma jallni agaynni ra hgitn lakrhmi.
Amuhawr jalla vowa vta hlakrhi hdm duthmi xaja.
Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2017 4:49 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 1228
Location: Scattered disc
Travis B. wrote:
next: 'harvest'

Poswa:

poppa, ultimately from pop "sprout, plant" and pa "in a field". That is, historically the Poswobs have been hunter-gatherers rather than farmers, so to them a harvest means foraging for wild plants when they are sporting ripe, nutritious fruit. There are many farms where apples grow, or in warmer climates, oranges, pineapples, and coconuts. But these plants pollinate naturally with little need for human intervention. Thus the verb derived from the word for "plant" refers to collection rather than seeding the ground.

This root is the source of the word for farmer, poppata, though as above the "farmers" are essentially just fruit-pickers who hire helpers when the fruit is ripe and spend the rest of the year involved in other pursuits, including (when possible) hunting and fishing, in order to sell the surplus catch to the same vendors who distribute their fruit.

There is an older root, plu, which originally meant "to pick fruit" specifically, and comes from an older construction meaning "to help (something) become separate". I was expecting to find this in my dictionary, but I seem to have abandoned in it except in a few stems referring to pollarded trees, pulling out one's own hair in frustration, and political support (i.e. you "support" the fruits you pick by choosing them from among the others). I could assign the meaning to a new word, pispumpa, which is distantly cognate to plu, adding words that once meant "buttocks, hips" and "to catch", neither of which is transparent in pispumpa.

------
Pabappa:
Likely popa, a straight cognate of Poswa's poppa. As a verb this is perfectly understandable, as it conflicts with no other stems. Popada means farmer, like its cognate in Poswa. To say "a harvest; the harvest", etc., one would need to use a phrase like popa pumbla "harvest season" or popa puwep "harvest time".

---------
next:
rainbow; gradient, spectrum, continuum

_________________
Sunàqʷa the Sea Lamprey says:
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 6:07 am 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2004 4:31 pm
Posts: 1733
Location: 가매
Soap wrote:
next: rainbow; gradient, spectrum, continuum

Kala:

hanisahi - /hanɪʃaːɦi/ - lit: color-spectrum

or

tlokusahi - /t͡ɬokuʃaːɦi/ - lit: color-arch

next: irrigate; irrigation

_________________
Kala blog | Kala grammar | IPA keyboard
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sat Aug 05, 2017 5:47 am 
Avisaru
Avisaru
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 18, 2016 11:11 pm
Posts: 255
Location: Łódź
masako wrote:
next: irrigate; irrigation
Zʼaqtho:
zøpʼ [ˈsøpʼ] water (stem)
îzøpʼ [ˈɯsøpʼ] water (î is a nature class marker)
îzøpʼkhun [ˈɯsøpxỹː] with water (khun [kũː] with)
îmizøpʼkhun [ˌɯmiˈsøpxỹː] to water
zaîmizøpʼkhun [ˌzɛɰmiˈsøpxỹː] to irrigate (za [zɑ] onto)
êzaîmizøpʼkhun [ɤˌzɛɰmiˈsøpxỹː] irrigation (ê action class marker)

next: contradiction

_________________
In Budapest:
- Hey mate, are you hung-a-ry?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 1:52 am 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 1228
Location: Scattered disc
ˈd̪ʲɛ.gɔ kɾuˑl̪ wrote:
next: contradiction

This is a tough one. Im not sure I can come up with a word that will match exactly with the English, but I can give a few close approximations. Lacking a word for "contradict" in a lexicon with over 10000 words reminds me that I've still got a lot of work to do. Even thoguh English needs 3 syllables for this word, I want to make this a basic morpheme in at least some of my lahguages.


Poswa:
Some words that I could use are:

nuto to deny reality .... this word is important to me, but I will probably have to scrub it since it doesn't have a proper etymology. It's essentially a placeholder for a word I will derive when I get around to it ... might even do it right after this TC. Probably will be cognate to lafo "to believe something is impossible", which tacks on to the end of a verb in the subjunctive mood. This verb itself
papumupa "to swallow a pregnant woman", a phrase I created once as a replacement for the above. Women on this planet are about the same height as men and a pregnant woman makes a good metaphor for something large. It's also kind of a hat tip to my younger self, where when I saw a movie poster something like this for (apparently) Attack of the 50 Foot Woman I was embarrassed and told my mother that there was a man in the movie that was at least as big as she was, apparently since my young mind couldnt accept the fact that a woman would be the unchallenged strongest person on Earth and go around .

But neither of those words really means the same as "contradict"; they're actually too narrow rather than too broad.

šoppampebam "to claim false", from šoppam "false, a lie" and pebam "to claim". That gets the meaning spot-on but I really want to make a shorter word, since this would reach 6 syllables with most of the verb endings it would need.

I could just go for semantic drift and take a word like mubia "to doubt" and say that it simply means "to contradict" now. One last option would be to take one of the words for "false", and say that it can be used as a verb meaning "to contradict" and needs a reflexive verb ending to mean "false". I think so long as the verbal meaning is primary, it wont be confused with "to lie".

edit: upon looking at this again, šoppampebam is fine and six syllables isn't too long considering that the English sentence "I contradicted you" is the same number of syllables as the Poswa translation Šoppampebambebi.


------
next: room divider, half-height wall

_________________
Sunàqʷa the Sea Lamprey says:
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 5:41 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2004 4:31 pm
Posts: 1733
Location: 가매
Soap wrote:
next: room divider, half-height wall

Kala:

yekasala - /jɛkaʃaːla/ - lit: separate-room

or

kutahi - /kutaːɦi/ - little wall (wall-DIM)

next: anxious; worried

_________________
Kala blog | Kala grammar | IPA keyboard
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 7:56 pm 
Sumerul
Sumerul

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 12:47 pm
Posts: 3581
Location: Milwaukee, US
masako wrote:
next: anxious; worried


worry, as a verbal noun: tš'ihetsə
anxious, worried (pass. part. of tš'ihetsə), in attributive form for sg. m. referents: tš'ihewatə

next: superlative

_________________
Dibotahamdn duthma jallni agaynni ra hgitn lakrhmi.
Amuhawr jalla vowa vta hlakrhi hdm duthmi xaja.
Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 3:22 pm 
Avisaru
Avisaru
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2007 10:02 pm
Posts: 779
Location: Brussels
Tormiott (Rockall):

oimâto ˈʊjmɛa̯tʊ (n) superlative
oi- (pref) augmentative
mâto - passive form of mat (v) to be big, to be tall; to be large, to be great (in size, compare menie)

_________

nextː cracker

_________________
— o noth sidiritt Tormiott


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sat Aug 12, 2017 11:59 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 1228
Location: Scattered disc
din wrote:
Tormiott (Rockall):

oimâto ˈʊjmɛa̯tʊ (n) superlative
oi- (pref) augmentative
mâto - passive form of mat (v) to be big, to be tall; to be large, to be great (in size, compare menie)

_________

nextː cracker
Crack and its derivatives have so many totally unrelated meanings that it makes me feel good about some of the wilder semantic leaps I've made in conlangs, such as having the word for moon serve also as a verb meaning to be afraid. But my languages are almost entirely without onomatopeia. I find it difficult to create onomatopeia because I can't shake off the influence of English. I have the word wabumbi "split, crack, fissure" but that's not really appropriate here because crackers are almost certainly named after their sound, not the fact that they break apart into pieces when people chew them (what else would happen?) I think a good sound for crunching would be [tɬætɬ], which would be interpreted in Poswa as /tʷatʷ/ or /tʷetʷ/, which would be spelled as twat and twet in Poswa since final labialization isn't usually Romanized. Right now, twet means "to urinate standing up" and one might think this word would not make for good onomatopoeia, but I expect I'll soon have a homophone for the other word too that I just haven't gotten around to yet.

The word for "floor tile" Is rape ... >_< yeah I promise I dont make words like this on purpose, it's traceable back to ùlapī and couldn't have emerged as anything else. Anyway, I use floor tiles because theyre the most common object that would be rectangular or of some other regular shape in Poswob culture, and because using a dummy word like "food" is a practice I prefer to avoid. So that means either twatrape or twetrape is the word for a cracker in Poswa.

Khulls:

Using the same [tɬætɬ] here I could produce an onomatopeic root such as kʷàkʷ, though my choice of the tone is entirely abritrary. The word for a floor tile is ôl, and the second noun in a head-final compound always attracts stress, so the full word would be kʷakʷôl, making the choice of tone in the first word irrelevant.

----------
next: hotel

_________________
Sunàqʷa the Sea Lamprey says:
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:33 am 
Sumerul
Sumerul
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2009 1:52 am
Posts: 4545
Location: the Imperial Corridor
Pannonian:

aitůišimer /ˈʔai̯tu̯oi̯ʂɨmər/ 'hotel', u-plural neuter
< aitů 'traveler' (< PIE *h1eytr + -ůi < Lat. -arius) + -šimer 'place, building' (< PIE *tk'ey-mh1no-)

In practice, however, people usually say
hotél /hoˈtel/ 'hotel', i-plural neuter

next:
traffic circle

_________________
Siöö jandeng raiglin zåbei tandiüłåd;
nää džunnfin kukuch vklaivei sivei tåd.
Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 10:19 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 1228
Location: Scattered disc
Nortaneous wrote:
traffic circle


Poswa:
pepope "car, automobile", from pepo "vehicle pulled by animals" + pe "vehicle, transportation" (not cognate to pepo, thus not seen as redundant) ... this word is like car in English ... it was part of the language long before automobiles were, and changed its usage when the new technology came about.
vovae "to march in a circle as a group" (from a religious ritual; distantly cognate to many other words, including the word for rainbow)
-m "place of" (usually causes mutation of the stem, but not in this case)
ža "road"

The last of these would probably be omitted, but since Poswobs' transportation technology does not go beyond horses and (in some areas) camels, there wouldn't be any need for rotaries and therefore when they come, Poswobs living in different regions might well create several different names for them, as we have in English on Earth. ("rotary" here, "roundabout" in some other places, "traffic circle" where neither of those others is dominant)

The word vovae usually implies marching on foot, but even so, I think for the sake of convenience the word can get by without pepope unless there is a need to distinguish it from a similar circular path intended to be used by pedestrians. With sound changes applied, the final word is thus

vovaemba "rotary, traffic circle, roundabout" (anyone know any other names?)

-----
Khulls:
For now, just xáġa "circle road", pronounced in IPA [xaː˥ga˩] Possible alternate form xáǯe "circle tree-road", for a road lined by fruit trees, which I might decide to make take over as the general purpose term since the other word for road will collide with various other morphemes. (ǯ is IPA /dʒ/)

------------
next:



coral, seaweed (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_coral for why a lang might have a single word for both, or at least two words from the same word stem)

_________________
Sunàqʷa the Sea Lamprey says:
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 2:16 am 
Sumerul
Sumerul
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2009 1:52 am
Posts: 4545
Location: the Imperial Corridor
North Pannonian:

loee 'edible seaweed' < Lat. laver (third declension r-stem, gen. sg. lov, nom. pl. loggi)
alga 'seaweed' < Lat. alga (first declension, gen. sg. algośa, nom. pl. algau)

actually, I'm not sure how Latin first declension nouns would be borrowed -- the nominative -a is formally identical to the second-declension Pannonian nominative -a, so maybe they'd become masculine?

next:
lettuce

_________________
Siöö jandeng raiglin zåbei tandiüłåd;
nää džunnfin kukuch vklaivei sivei tåd.
Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 7:09 am 
Smeric
Smeric

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 2:49 am
Posts: 2316
Location: Bonn, Germany
Nortaneous wrote:
next:
lettuce


Tautisca: lattuga (from Lemba Romana [la't:uga] < Latin lactuca)

Next: people


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 11:39 am 
Lebom
Lebom
User avatar

Joined: Wed Dec 04, 2013 3:57 pm
Posts: 107
Location: 此の市、其の州、彼の国
Watermattering:

ASPANTAASS | n. | People; gang, group. | aspantaa-ss | pebbles.HUMNMLZ
JAAJU | [fam] You all; good people; excellent crop; tasty fruits/vegetables; useful/timely materials; &c good things. | J-J + AA-U | good + bunch
SAUIJINH | People; total attendance, audience, crowd, visitors. | S-J-J + AUI | flock + contained
SWW | People; population; [frm] (especially/only) you all. | S + WW | imperson + key

Next: to stand, prop up


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 12:38 pm 
Sumerul
Sumerul
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2009 1:52 am
Posts: 4545
Location: the Imperial Corridor
North Pannonian has a productive causative suffix -ai (trivially from PIE *eyeti), but has turned *steh2 into part of the copula and replaced its original meaning with *Hreh1 (cf. Albanian rri). Standard NP has generally lost initial vowels, but the dialects that have them preserve ˀugamai, so on Pannonian evidence the initial laryngeal must have been *h3, suggesting a possible pre-PIE relation to *h3reg'. The particular formation of 'put, cause to stand' is inherited from Proto-Pannonian, hence the irregular root: the innovative form would be *ˀjemai. Epenthetic -m- is regular.

Anyway.

North Pannonian:
kˀamaivai 'put'
śetugámaivai 'cause to stand upright'

Libu śi laˀklumen kˀameu.
I put the book on the shelf.

Next:
shelf

_________________
Siöö jandeng raiglin zåbei tandiüłåd;
nää džunnfin kukuch vklaivei sivei tåd.
Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei. Chei.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:08 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 1228
Location: Scattered disc
Nortaneous wrote:

Next:
shelf
Not really a new word but I like to keep the thread moving. I'll go for breadth instead of depth this time. Some of these words are not specific enough to be considered true synonyms and might be padded with additional precising morphemes.

Tapilula: otèho "shelf, bed, bunk in a bed"

Old Andanese: okèho

Galà: okèqo
Litila: okèqo
Udami: okèqo (/h/ > /q/ after a checked tone is an areal feature)
Lyugi: ucəhu <--- this language needs a makeover, though, since it has almost no /p t s/
Proto-Olati: otèso (not a retention; this language did /t/>/k/>/t/)
Late Andanese: ukihu "shelf, platform, level, story"

Proto-Macro-Subumpamese: otə̄x
Proto-Kava: ətūx
Kava: mutūx (the initial classifier ə- was replaced with mu-)

Proto-Nuclear Subumpamese: otīx
Proto-Eastern Subumpamese: otīš
Proto-Central Subumpamese: otīg

I'm considering scrubbing the plans for West Subumpamese, saying that the speakers were replaced by the Olati speakers (see above), whose language belongs to the Andanic family but in many ways resembles Subumpamese more than it resembles the other Andanic languages.

There may be some slight semantic drift involved in Subumpamese too, but in general the Subumpamese languages evolve faster than my other languages and all of the changes above are complete before the other branches even reach their proto-languages.

Gold: adas (this language will probably replace the classifier as well, but I haven't addressed it yet, since all of the major descendants of this language entirely drop the classifiers anyway, and therefore it matters very little) .... languages in this family tend to abundantly feature the vowel /a/.
Khulls: las, gʷaras (the latter is gʷa + las)
Proto-Moonshine: las, waras

I started work on the target Moonshine language back in 1994, but I have more than 200 sound changes to get from any Proto-MS word into Moonshine itself, so I'm probably going to scrub Mooinshine too and just start calling PMS "Moonshine".

Bābākiam: pasiaas (cognate to Khulls gʷa + sirà + las)
Poswa: pašas (genitive: pašapas)
Pabappa: pasabama

-------------
next:

mermaid

_________________
Sunàqʷa the Sea Lamprey says:
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:26 pm 
Sumerul
Sumerul

Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2005 12:47 pm
Posts: 3581
Location: Milwaukee, US
Soap wrote:
next:

mermaid


mermaid: Old Laqar re når (lit. "sea unmarried woman")

next: barn

_________________
Dibotahamdn duthma jallni agaynni ra hgitn lakrhmi.
Amuhawr jalla vowa vta hlakrhi hdm duthmi xaja.
Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro. Irdro.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2017 5:53 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 1228
Location: Scattered disc
Quote:
next: barn

People on planet Teppala are primarily hunter-gatherers, with fishing also representing a large portion of the food supply in most areas. Societies with agriculture have never been able to reach a carrying capacity significantly higher than those of the hunter-gatherers, and therefore farming has not been widely adopted.

However, there are some areas of the planet which have arable land divided into large plantations, requiring the use of heavy manual labor. The workers on these plantations have historically often been slaves taken from a rival tribe, either closely related (as is the case with Pabap slaves in Thaoa), or very distant (such as Subumpamese slaves in the tropics of Tūġyaităna). Slaves typically live together in a building provided to them for free, and can be considered to earn their keep through their labor.

Poswa:
džapa, pembom, and plupta all mean "slave", and the latter two are distantly cognate. Words for a dormitory could be kutša, sytša, or pampa, where the first two explicitly mean "sleep building" and the third is descended from a word for fort, and implies that it's for the protection of the slaves rather than being just a minimal building with little structure.

However the word pi also means slave, and is the first element in the historical compounds that have become pembom and plupta. Even with plantation farming occupying just a small percentage of the population, a word like this would certainly use the shortest possible word for its slaves' living quarters.

I would therefore go with pipampa, or possibly pisitša (the vowel rotation is due to a sound change).

Pabappa:
Likely pipampis, based on the same formula.

-------
next: swimming pool

_________________
Sunàqʷa the Sea Lamprey says:
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2017 9:22 am 
Smeric
Smeric

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 2:49 am
Posts: 2316
Location: Bonn, Germany
Soap wrote:
next: swimming pool

Tautisca: pessína (from Lemba Romana [pε's:ina] < Latin piscina)

Next: feather


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Fri Sep 08, 2017 5:50 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 1228
Location: Scattered disc
hwhatting wrote:
Soap wrote:
next: swimming pool

Tautisca: pessína (from Lemba Romana [pε's:ina] < Latin piscina)

Next: feather


Tapilula:
nutùŋu "feather"
nuhŏgi "wings, feathers"
Both roots incorporate the bird classifier nu-. Thus by changing the classifier one can also say yotùŋu "feather pen" and other words. In at least one daughter language, this same root is also the word for fish fins other than the tail.

Old Andanese: ŋukùnu "feather"
The other root comes to be used to mean "wing" instead. The change of the prefix is not a sound change but a substitution, as Old Andanese had shuffled its classifier system around somewhat.

Galà/Litila/Udami: ŋukùnu (unchanged in all three daughter languages both in form and in meaning)

Proto-Olati: likely nutùnu (not a retention; this language did /k ŋ/ > /t n/ unconditionally)

Late Andanese: Possibly ikunu, with another change of classifier prefix due to the presence of an unrelated word iku "bird". With this change, the speakers would think that the simple syllable nu by itself means "feather", but could only be used with the word for bird functioning as though it were a classifier prefix. This type of reanalysis is common in Late Andanese because the language has only 30 syllables and therefore many unrelated words collide just by chance.


Paleo-Pabappa: məpum This language was a substratum of the language that became Pabappa, but is not closely related to Pabappa.

Gold:
nutun,
nuhăgi

Khulls: ton, xăgi (classifier prefixes dropped)
Proto-Moonshine: ton, hagi


Bābākiam: tum
Poswa: I have this in the dictionary as tombom. The first part of that comes from the common root up above, but I dont have an etymology for the second part even though I had it marked in the dictionary as though I did. I won't resort to just borrowing from Paleo-Pabappa even though the sound change /pum/ > /bom/ would fit perfectly; no language borrows a foreign loan for a word it already has and then just sticks the two together.
------------------------------
next:

meeting, group, large planned social activity

_________________
Sunàqʷa the Sea Lamprey says:
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:48 am 
Smeric
Smeric

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 2:49 am
Posts: 2316
Location: Bonn, Germany
Soap wrote:
meeting, group, large planned social activity

Tautisca: comachti "meeting, gathering; public event; market, fair; crowd" Prefix com- "together", achti verbal noun of achten "to drive".

Next: marriage


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 12:16 pm 
Avisaru
Avisaru
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 10, 2007 10:02 pm
Posts: 779
Location: Brussels
Tormiott (Rockall)

mothuadade ˈmoθwɪˌðɛðə (n) wedding; marriage {active form of mothuade}
- mothuade ˈmoθwɪðə (v) to marry, to wed
- - moth- (pref) together, in a duo, twinned, paired up, allied, complementary
- - uade (v) to make sure, to ensure; to insure {from EN wed or ON veðja}


- - - - -
next: zipper

_________________
— o noth sidiritt Tormiott


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Lexicon Building
PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 2:30 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 1228
Location: Scattered disc
din wrote:
Tormiott (Rockall)

mothuadade ˈmoθwɪˌðɛðə (n) wedding; marriage {active form of mothuade}
- mothuade ˈmoθwɪðə (v) to marry, to wed
- - moth- (pref) together, in a duo, twinned, paired up, allied, complementary
- - uade (v) to make sure, to ensure; to insure {from EN wed or ON veðja}


- - - - -
next: zipper
My languages don't generally make use of onomatopeia, but I realize that's basically a universal, so I'll look at that at the end of the post.

Poswa:

Basic vocabulary items that could be involved here include
teppas "to tie two things together"
nuvi, nuvwa "to staple"
žažva "to stitch, staple"

pumpa "to pull" (generic)
ruša "to pull at both ends; to stretch"
mamwa "to pull to a stop"

pop "two equal parts"

pwu "to be able to"

blala "to split into pieces with one motion"


Withese words I can build pumpamblalapwu "(now you) can split into pieces by pulling". The possessed forms of this merely rotate the last vowel, e.g. pumpamblalapwo" my zipper", pumpamblalapwe "your zipper", etc.


---
Khulls:
Possibly just mŏkʷ "pull tie", but this has the structure of a verb, not a noun. If a certain type of analogy had happened a certain point in the history of the language, I could create mòkʷ and make that the noun form. But that would mean that the tone of the first syllable no longer has any lexical significance, since all of the verbs would have the breve tone and all of the nouns would have the grave tone. I'd rather not do this. Instead I could make a new compound, mŏkʷe "pull tie" + "handheld object", which actually has three morphemes despite having only four phonemes. This is not rare in this language.


-----------
next:

pill (medicine)

_________________
Sunàqʷa the Sea Lamprey says:
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4309 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group