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 Post subject: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Thu Jun 15, 2017 3:04 pm 
Niš
Niš

Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 2:03 pm
Posts: 4
Here is a challenge for all of you that I thought would be a fun conlanging excersize! Since this is my first time posting on the ZBB, I am not sure if I have made this post properly. In this challenge, you must get 2 phonologies and use sound changes to shift from one to the other. Once finished, provide 2 phonologies for the next person to be challenged with. Try to think of at least 3 example words to demonstrate the sound changes.

Here is an example!

Start
/p t k/
/t͡s/
/ɸ s/
/m n/
/ɾ/
/i u a/
(C)(R)V(N)

Input
/kansu/
/ampati/
/ɾumɸi/
/maku/

Finish
/p b t d k g/
/t͡ʃ d͡ʒ/
/f v s z ʃ ʒ/
/l j w/
/i u e o a/
/iː uː eː oː aː/

Sound Changes
/ɸ/ > /f/
/Np Nt Nk/ > /b d g/ (N = Nasal)
/Nf Ns/ > /v z/
/p t k f s/ > /b d g v z/ (intervocalically)
/V/ > /Vː/ (open syllables)
/i u a/ > /ɪ ʊ ɐ/ > /e o ə/
/iː uː aː/ > /i u a/
/ə/ > Ø (VC_CV, unstressed, or VC_#)
/ə/ > /V/ (if V is in the next syllable. Otherwise, /ə/ > /a/)
/ɾ/ > /l/
/aCa eCe iCi oCo uCu/ > /aː eː iː oː uː/
/aCe oCe uCe/ > /aːC oːC uːC/
/b g/ > /u/ (V_C)
/d/ > /i/ (V_C)
/i u/ > /j w/ (before vowels)
/ti di si zi/ > /t͡ʃ d͡ʒ ʃ ʒ/ (before consonants or word-final)

Output
/koːz/
/jud͡ʒ/
/loːv/
/muːg/

--

Next:

From this symmetric phonology:
/p t ʈ t͡ɕ k/
/f s ʂ ɕ x/
/m n ɳ ȵ ŋ/
/ʋ l ɻ j w/
/i u e o a/
(C)V(N)

To this:
/p b t d k g kʷ gʷ/
/f s h/
/m n/
/l r j w/
/i u e o a/
/iː uː eː oː aː/
(C)V(C)

Optional Sample:
/kojo/
/weʂu/
/minte/

You can decide upon your own if you choose to, just remember to show both the input and the output.


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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Thu Jun 15, 2017 3:13 pm 
Sanci
Sanci

Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2016 2:43 am
Posts: 57
Location: Russia, Saint-Petersburg
Alright, here we go:

Start - something Indian
/p t ʈ t͡ɕ k/
/f s ʂ ɕ x/
/m n ɳ ȵ ŋ/
/ʋ l ɻ j w/
/i u e o a/
(C)V(N)

Sound changes:
VN → Ṽ/!_V
ʈ → ʈʂ/V_V
ʈʂ tɕ → ʂ ɕ
ɳ ȵ → ɻ̃ j̃
ʈ → t
p t k → b d g/V_V
ɻ̃ j̃ → ã ĩ
s → z → r/V_V
ɻ → ʐ → ʂ
ʋ → w
ɕ ʂ → s x
x → h
ŋ → n
ku gu → kʷ gʷ/_(V#)
V → Ø/_# [- stress] this also phonemizes the voiced plosive series
Ṽ → Vː

End - something staggeringly average and bland
/p b t d k g kʷ gʷ/
/f s h/
/m n/
/l r j w/
/i u e o a/
/iː uː eː oː aː/
(C)V(C)

Sample:
/kojo/ → /koj/
/weʂu/ → /weh/
/minte/ → /miːt/

My turn:

Let's turn Spanish:
/p t tʃ k/
/f θ s x/
/β ð ʝ ɣ/
/m n ɲ/
/ɾ r l/
/i e a o u/
(C)(L)(W)V(W)(C)(s), L is liquid and W is a semivowel

Into this beastie:
/p pʰ t tʰ k kʰ kʷ kʷʰ ʔ/
/s h/
/m m̥ n n̥/
/r l/
/i e a o u/
/iː eː aː oː uː/
/ie uo ai oi ou/
̆(C)(C)(L)(W)V(W)(ʔ)


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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Tue Jun 20, 2017 2:58 pm 
Sanci
Sanci
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Joined: Fri Jul 10, 2015 5:56 pm
Posts: 21
Location: Right Behind You
Starting point: Castillan Spanish:
/p t tʃ k/
/f θ s x/
/b~β d~ð ɟ~ʝ g~ɣ/ (FTFY)
/m n ɲ/
/ɾ r l/
/i e a o u/
(C)(L)(W)V(W)(C)(s), L is liquid and W is a semivowel

F=fricative, X=unvoiced fricative, Z=voiced fricative, T=stop, P=unvoiced stop, B=voiced stop, K=unvoiced consonant, Æ=diphthong/VL cluster, N=nasals


Syncope
θ→t/V_V
[k,g][w,o,u]→[kʷ,gʷ,kʷo,gʷo,kʷu,gʷu]
Tw→kʷ,gʷ
V→/[- stress]/Æ
Æ→[+ stress]
V→/[- stress]
Collapse of the Palatals (&θ)
ɟ→dʒ
ʝ→z/C_C
ʝ→j
ɲ→nj/_V
ɲ→jn/V_
ɲ→n
θ→f/_V
θ→s
English Influence
Cs→s
T→ʔ/_$
P→Pʰ
x→h
ɾ→l
Normal Consequences
XN→XN̥
VFL→VːL
VF→Vː/_$
h→/
Spanish Happens Again
tʃ→ʃ
dʒ→ʒ
Z→F
B→P
ʃ→x
[f,x]→h
Final Stuff
h→ʔ/_$
[m,l]→w/_$
[n,r]→j/_$
VCʔ→Vːʔ
TT→T/_V (first stop's aspiration, second stop's POA)

/p pʰ t tʰ k kʰ kʷ kʷʰ ʔ/ b p d t g k q ğ x
/s h/ s h
/m m̥ n n̥/ m fm n fn
/r l/ r l
/i e a o u/ i e a o u
/iː eː aː oː uː/ ii ee aa oo uu
/iː eː aː oː uː/ ij ~ ~ ~ uw
/ie uo ai oi ou/ ie uo ai oi ou
/ie uo ai oi ou/ ~ ~ aj oj ow
̆(C)(C)(L)(W)V(W)(ʔ)

No estoy cerveza, más borracho por favor. → N'estoi felbex, maa brax pow fow.
Mis hijos son lerdos. → Mis'ii soj leej.
Proclama la presente Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos como ideal común por el que todos los pueblos y naciones deben esforzarse, a fin de que tanto los individuos como las instituciones, inspirándose constantemente en ella, promuevan, mediante la enseñanza y la educación, el respeto a estos derechos y libertades, y aseguren, por medidas progresivas de carácter nacional e internacional, su reconocimiento y aplicación universales y efectivos, tanto entre los pueblos de los Estados Miembros como entre los de los territorios colocados bajo su jurisdicción. → Proklaw la preseeh glartjoj ujhejsaw dree maa kow daw kmuj por ewk too loo qeeloo y natjoo deej sowhaaj, a hij ge taax los'ijduos kow las'ijstjoo, ijsplájdse cojstaaxmeex n'ej, plomueej, medjaax l'ejsnjaaj y l'egatjoj, ew respex ee dlee y liirtaa, y aaguj, pow medii prooresii glatew natjonaw e'jtejtjonaw, su reknoxmieex y aplixtjoj ujhejsaaw y fetii, taax ejtre loo qeeloo de loo staa miewbroo kow ejtre loo dloo tejtoljoo kowkaa bao su uudixfjoj.
Just because the above didn't have unvoiced nasals: Jamón → Fmoj, Jamás → Fmaa, Jineta → Fnex, etc.
These contrast with Mono → Moj, Más → Maa, Neto → Nex, etc.

Next:
Turn Hawaiian
/p t~k ʔ/
/h/
/m n~ŋ/
/ʋ l~ɺ~ɾ/
/i e a o u/
(C)V

into Old Irish
/b t d k g/
/bʲ tʲ dʲ kʲ gʲ/
/f v θ ð s x ɣ h/
/fʲ vʲ θʲ ðʲ sʲ xʲ ɣʲ hʲ/
/m n ŋ/
/mʲ nʲ ŋʲ/
/w̃ l l̝ r r̝ w/
/ṽʲ lʲ l̝ʲ rʲ r̝ʲ vʲ/
/i e a o u/
/iː eː aː oː uː/

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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 3:25 pm 
Osän
Osän
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Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 11090
Location: šinambiem bambam
My understanding is that Hawaiian does not contrast a long vowel with a sequence of two of the corresponding short vowel, so in this analysis, all long vowels are ignored, and are treated as /aa ee ii oo uu/. Your initial setup seems to assume the same.

Modern Hawaiian to Old Irish:


    All two syllable CVCV sequences metathesize, creating one-syllable CVVC sequences. CVV words (with no central consonant) remain CVV. CV morphemes remain CV, and morphemes of three or more syllables change from the right end going to the left; i.e. CVCVCV ---> CVCVVC. (Perhaps a precursor to this, shift all stress onto the penult.)

    The inner VV sequences become falling diphthongs. (Too many to list, so I wont bother, but there are no changes in vowler quality yet.)

    [k] > /t/ unconditionally. [ŋ] also > /n/ unconditionally.

    Consonants preceded by [a o u] become broad. Consonants preceded by [e i] become slender.

    Slenderness bleeds across a syllable boundary, making all clusters agree in their broad/slender distinction. Because slenderness "wins" in any conflict, there are slightly more slender consonants than broad consonants in an average sentence, even though they were created by a marked criteria. Probability 16/25 in medial position, 10/25 at edges.

    Intervocalic stop consonants become voiced unless preceded by another stop, including the glottal stop (remember that almost all syllables are closed, and most morphemes are monosyllabic, so intervocalic stops are rare but nevertheless do exist).

    [ʔ] > /0/, because it's just getting in the way at this point, especially with the language being almost entirely composed of closed syllables.

    /h/ steps across any syllable boundary, thus creating a series of aspirated consonants. Voiced aspirated stops become voiceless aspirates.

    /h/ becomes /x/ before a vowel, even if after a consonant.

    Sequences of nasal + /x/ become nasal + stop. (This has nothing to do with the challenge, but I use this or something similar in almost every conlang I create.)

    /tx/ > /kx/ < /k/, since there was no other [k] in the language.

    Coronal consonants bordered by [u] in either direction become velar. These can still be slender, provided there is a front vowel on the other side of the consonant.

    Aspiration calms back down, shifting back to /h/ except when bare.

    Aspirated stops become voiceless fricatives. (/th/ > /s/, not θ.)

    Aspirated nasals become voiced fricatives. (I know that this is NOT how it happened in Irish, even though voiced frics are sometimes called "aspirates", and sometimes come from nasals, but I think this is a legitimate change. If not, I propose first a shift of /mh nh ŋh/ > /bh dh gh/ to restore the voiced aspirate stops temporarily.) Here again, /nh/ > /z/, not /ð/.

    /hh/ > /h/, thus restoring true bare /h/.

    /ŋŋ/ > /w̃/.

    All sequences of the same bowel become true long vowels.

    /s/ and /z/ preceded by an [a] of any origin become dentals: /θ ð/. /l/ in the same situation shifts to /r/.

    Coda /u/ and /i/ self-delete.

    All remaining vowel sequences become single short vowels, resolved in favor of the first one (since they were all falling diphthongs, even /ia/ etc).

    Word-initial vowels disappear, thus phonemicinzing many things that only occurrred in medial position up until now.

    /z/ > /r/.

    Doubled sonorants become the fortis version of the sonorant.

    nasal + stop ---> voiced stop. (that is, /mp mb/ > /b/, etc)

    /v/ > /w/ (not if slender).

    /p/ > /b/ unconditionally.

Please let me know if I misse something. Im putting my challenge into a second post since this is one is already very long.

_________________
Wow! 12:30 just for that level : /


Last edited by Soap on Fri Jun 23, 2017 3:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 3:58 pm 
Osän
Osän
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Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 11090
Location: šinambiem bambam
next:
This challenge is mostly about vowels and tones, not so much about consonants.


STARTING PHONOLOGY

Consonants:
/p m w/
/t d n s l r/
/č ǯ š ž j/
/k ŋ x ɣ h/
/kʷ xʷ ɣʷ hʷ/

Vowels:
/a i u ə/
/ā ī ū ə̄/

There are no tones.
There are no diphthongs ... although long sequences of vowels do exist, they are pronounced as individual syllables.
Syllables can begin with only one consonant.
Syllables can end in any of:
/m n ŋ/
/l/
/h/ <--- this is usually metathesized to the following syllable, but speakers differ on this sandhi process and some peripheral dialects keep it always in the syllable coda and vary its pronunciation between [x] and [h].
/k/ <--- this always assimilates to the PoA of a following consonant, but otherwise always remains a voiceless stop.

The nasals can also be syllabic, and can be padded on both sides by consonants just like the vowels can, so that, for example, /pṁn/ is a perfectly valid word.

TARGET PHONOLOGY:
Consonants:
/p pʷ m f w/
/t n s l r/
/č ǯ š ž j/
/k kʷ ŋ x ɣ h/

Vowels:
/a e i o u/

Tones:
There are six tones:

The simple tone, spelled ă, is a short mid tone.
The high tone, spelled á, is a short high tone, usually followed by a glottal stop. Vowels with this tone are slightly centralized.
The long high tone, ā, is longer and does not have a glottal stop. It also makes the following syllable lower than normal. When final, it becomes a long falling tone.
The low coarse tone, spelled â, is low, long, and pharyngealized.
The strong coarse tone, spelled à, is also pharyngealized, but pronounced on a higher tone. It makes surrounding syllables on both sides become low-tone.
The rising tone, spelled , is similar to the long high tone, but does not affect surrounding syllables. When final, it becomes a rising tone.

_________________
Wow! 12:30 just for that level : /


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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2017 10:19 am 
Sanci
Sanci

Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2016 2:43 am
Posts: 57
Location: Russia, Saint-Petersburg
I suppose this is what I get for taking so long with the challenge. I wanted to turn Hawaiian into Old Irish too, Soap, though my methog would've involved a series of unstressed vowel epentheses and intervocalic lenitions. I’m not sure what you mean by “bare” consonants though – maybe intervocalic ones?

Now, let's try your challenge, shall we?

As a preface, I’ll say that this diachronic description is based on the assumption that the simple tone, ă, is the default and unmarked one, which fits its description.

Start:
/p m w/
/t d n s l r/
/č ǯ š ž j/
/k ŋ x ɣ h/
/kʷ xʷ ɣʷ hʷ/
/a i u ə/
/ā ī ū ə̄/

(C)[V,N̩]([N,l,h,k])

Sound changes:

1)Preparation for tonogenesis 1:

k → ʔ/V_ !_V


2)Tonogenesis 1:

Vʔ → V́ The glottal stop is reinterpreted as an integral part of the first tone.
V̄ʔ → V̄ This tone achieves a noticeably higher pitch than the short high tone, with a correspondingly steeper fall in pitch in the next syllable, which quickly becomes one of its main phonetic features.


3)Schwa oppression begins:

ə̄ → ə
ə → ə[-stress]

4)Labialised fricative shenanigans

xʷ → x
ɣʷ → w
hʷ → ɸʷ → pʷ This is directly inspired by Japanese, where /h/ to /b/ is a frequent consonant mutation.

5)Syllabic nasal vocalisation:

[ŋ,m] n → ũ ĩ These vowels are distinguished from their allophonically nasalised before nasals oral counterparts by their higher degree of nasalisation.


6) /d/ lenition and devoicing

d → ð/V_V
d → t


7)Vowel length neutralisation, glide elision, rising tone formation and diphthong formation.

V̄[+tone] → V All long toneless vowels shorten, but long high tone ones stay put.
CVwə → CVu̯
CVjə → CVi̯
CV([h,ɣ,ð])ə → CV
CVwə́ → CV̋u̯
CVjə́ → CV̋i̯
CV([h,ɣ,ð])[ə,ə́] → CV̋
C[V́,V̄]w[ə,ə́] → CV̄u̯
C[V́,V̄]j[ə,ə́] → CV̄i̯
C[V́,V̄]([h,ɣ,ð])[ə,ə́] → CV̄
ð → z → r
ə → a

V̋ is at this point realised as rising in all environments and peaking at a noticeably lower pitch than the long high tone. Consequently, the drop in pitch in the next syllable is not as noticeable.

8)/h/ cluster reinterpretation and preparation for tonogenesis 2
h → ʔ/V_ !_V
hC → Ch → Cʔ → Cˀ


9)Nasal vowel denasalisation

ĩ ũ → e o The lower height of nasal vowels becomes their main distinguishing feature and the nasality is lost.

10)Tonogenesis 2

VCˀ →VˀC → V̂C
Vʔ →Vˀʔ → V̂
V́Cˀ → V́ˀC → V̀C
V́ʔ → V́ˀʔ → V̀
[V̄,V̋]Cˀ → V̄ˀC → V̏C This is the long strong coarse tone, which won’t survive for long. It does, however, have the long high tone’s, ability to lower the following syllable as one of its phonetic features, and another one of those features is its ability to also lower the tone of the preceding syllable, which arose from the rising contour of one of its predecessors, the rising tone.
[V̄,V̋]bʔ → V̄ˀʔ → V̏
ʔ → Ø

Here, glottalisation shfts to pharyngealisation, which is hardly even a phonetic change.


11)Tone merger 1

V̋ and V̄ merge into one phonetically long high tone, higher than the unmarked tone but lower than the V̄ tone used to be, everywhere except word – finally, with the main distinguishing characteristic of V̄ now being its ability to cause a significant drop in pitch in the next syllable. Word – finally, V̄ becomes, phonetically, a long falling tone.



12)Coda /l/ vocalisation

l → u̯/V_ !_V

This sound change isn’t really required for the end result, but I personally think that having nasals as the only available coda is a nice touch/

13)Tone merger 2

V̏ delengthens, merging with V̀ unconditionally. The strong coarse tone also inherits the long strong coarse tone’s ability to lower the pitch of the surrounding syllables.

End:
Consonants:
/p pʷ m f w/
/t n s l r/
/č ǯ š ž j/
/k kʷ ŋ x ɣ h/
/a e i o u/

The simple tone, spelled ă, is a short mid tone.
The high tone, spelled á, is a short high tone, usually followed by a glottal stop. Vowels with this tone are slightly centralized.
The long high tone, ā, is longer and does not have a glottal stop. It also makes the following syllable lower than normal. When final, it becomes a long falling tone.
The low coarse tone, spelled â, is low, long, and pharyngealized.
The strong coarse tone, spelled à, is also pharyngealized, but pronounced on a higher tone. It makes surrounding syllables on both sides become low-tone.
The rising tone, spelled a̋, is similar to the long high tone, but does not affect surrounding syllables. When final, it becomes a rising tone.


Last edited by Knit Tie on Sun Jun 25, 2017 10:48 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2017 10:41 am 
Sanci
Sanci

Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2016 2:43 am
Posts: 57
Location: Russia, Saint-Petersburg
As for my own challenge, I'd like to ask you to transform modern English into my minimalist conlang as of late.

English:

Consonants:
/p b t d k g/
/f v θ ð s z ʃ ʒ h/
/tʃ dʒ/
/w j l ɻ/
/m n ŋ/

Vowels:
However you wish to transcribe and/or analyse this multifeatural trainwreck.

Syllable structure:
(C)(C)(C)V(C)(C)(C)(C)

Conlang:

Consonants:
/p t tʃ k ʔ/
/s ʃ x h l/
/m~w n~r ɲ~j ŋ~ɣ/

Vowels:
/a i u/
/iː aː uː ɛː/
/ã ĩ ũ/
/ĩː ãː ũː ɛ̃ː/

Syllable structure:
(C)V(C) with restricted clusters.


Last edited by Knit Tie on Sun Jun 25, 2017 10:46 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Sat Jul 01, 2017 5:52 am 
Lebom
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Posts: 119
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bump.

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Dam Afenz, ésūl syl roä é matraä, é om sam tempen, ésūl syl an qontander pil
ésme nuli batra susol san Ga'ette; iftra, otoŕūl syl qontanor zeytan.


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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2017 12:13 pm 
Lebom
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Posts: 156
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I'll take AuE/NZE for the vowels. Here you are:
/e/ (DRESS) :> /i/ or /iː/
/eː/ (SQUARE) :> /iː/
/ɪ/ (KIT) :> /i/ or /iː/
/ɪː/ (NEAR) :> /iː/
/a/ (TRAP) :> /a/ or /aː/
/aː/ (BAD) :> /ɛː/
/ɐ/ (STRUT) :> /a/ or /aː/
/ɐː/ (START, PALM, BATH) :> /aː/
/ʉː/ (GOOSE) :> /uː/
/ʊ/ (FOOT) :> /u/
/oː/ (THOUGHT, NORTH, FORCE, CURE) :> /u/ or /uː/
/ɔ/ (LOT, CLOTH) :> /u/ or /uː/
/øː/ (NURSE) :> /ɛː/
/əɪ̯/ (FLEECE) :> /ɛː/
/æɔ/ (MOUTH) :> /uː/ or /aw/ or /aːw/
/əʉ/ (GOAT) :> /uː/ or /aw/ or /aːw/ or /uw/
/æɪ/ (FACE) :> /ɛː/ or /ɛːj/
/ɑe/ (PRICE) :> /ɛː/ or /aj/ or /aːj/
/oɪ/ (CHOICE) :> /ɛː/ or /uj/ or /uːj/
/ə/ (ROSES, LETTER, COMMA) :> /a/
Different outcomes are due to pre-voiced lengthening of vowels. The "diphthongal" pronunciations of current diphthongs exist before other vowels or nasals. The /uw/ realisation of GOAT exists before /l/. Vowels and semivowels before nasals become nasalised.
/ɹ/ :> /r/
/ɾ/ :> /r/
[ɾ̃] :> [n] /r/
/t/ :> [ts] :> /s/ word-initially and under stress
/d/ :> /t/
/p/ :> [pʰ] /ph/ w.i.a.u.s.
/b/ :> /p/
/k/ :> [kʰ] /k/ w.i.a.u.s.
/g/ :> /ɣ/
/m/ /n/ /ŋ/ :> [w] [r] [ɣ] w.i.
/p/ /t/ /k/ :> /ʔ/
Nasals disappear before fricatives
/jn/ :> /j/
/v/ :> /w/
/h/ :> /ʔ/ h-dropping and blocking of linking r
/f/ /θ/ :> /h/
/z/ /ʒ/ :> /ʒ/ :> /ɹ/ :> /r/
/ð/ :> this Danish lateral stuff described once by Wells :> /l/
/dʒ/ /tʃ/ /ʃ/ :> /tʃ/ /ʃ/ /x/
Put schwa everywhere you like and assign it to /a/
I'll give some examples:
hence :> /ʔĩs/
longer :> /lɔŋgə/ :> /lũɣa/ which can be sth like [lõŋə]
catastrophe :> /kasasataruhɛː/
winter :> /wĩra/ [wĩnə]
winner :> /wĩːra/ [wĩːnə]
vine :> /wãːj/ [wãːɲ]
pounding :> /phãːwrĩɣ/ [pʰãːmnĩŋ/

And now the challenge:
Polish
/m n ɲ/
/p b t d k g/
/ts dz tʃ dʒ tɕ dʑ/
/f v s z ʃ ʒ ɕ ʑ x/
/r l j w/
/i ɨ u ɛ ɔ a/
Here I analise the palatalised sounds as strings of them + /j/, the only ones which can't be phonemically palatalised are /n tɕ dʑ ɕ ʑ j/. /ɛ/ is a bit centralised, /a/ is definitely central, all the allophones and phonotactics as given on Wikipedia.
Target: My dream language
/m n̥ n ŋ/
/p b t d k g/
/f θ ð s x ɣ h/
/r̥ r l̥ l j̊ j ʍ w/
/i y e ø ɛ ɨ u o ɔ a/ and a chroneme /ː/ appliable to everything except /r̥ l̥ j̊ j ʍ w n̥ ŋ/.
Phonotactics like in Old Norse, lots of /j/ clusters! Good luck :-D.
Diego

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If there are mistakes in my posts, don't get angry on my teachers. Also, call me Diego.


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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2017 1:44 pm 
Niš
Niš

Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2016 6:32 am
Posts: 5
Location: In a shingle near Odin City
Soap's challenge intrigued me, to say the least. So, I decided to do some "translation" exercise on the good old UDHR article 1, translated into hawai'ian:

Hānau kū’oko’a ‘ia nā kānaka apau loa, a ua kau like ka hanohano a me nā pono kīvila ma luna o kākou pākahi. Ua ku’u mai ka no’ono’o pono a me ka ‘ike pono ma luna o kākou, no laila, e aloha kākou kekahi i kekahi.

Doing all of Soap's sound changes and rewriting the result in irish orthography, we get:

Chána cúdo i ná tánát ba lo, a u ta luit ta charan a me ná bón toíbhiar ma lun o tádo bádaih. U cú ma ta nónó bón a me ta it bón ma lun o tádo, no lailia, e roh sádo tediaih i tediaih.

It looks quite Irish, just as advertised. Are there any discrepancies you can spot? I'd like your advice.


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 Post subject: Re: The Phonology Game
PostPosted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 3:06 pm 
Niš
Niš

Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2017 2:03 pm
Posts: 4
Glad to see this thread hasn't died! This challenge looks pretty fun!


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