zompist bboard

WE ARE MOVING - see Ephemera
It is currently Fri Dec 14, 2018 9:43 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Mar 25, 2017 2:30 pm 
Lebom
Lebom
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 12, 2017 3:31 am
Posts: 189
Location: Montrouge, France
Standard Pop Accent

I'm an occasional singer in a rock band. Being a non-native speaker, I wanted to make my pronunciation a bit more "orderly", by adopting a precise accent as a target. So I ended up creating my own, that I call (a bit pretentiously) the Standard Pop Accent. It's not very original, more of an a posteriori standardized version of the way rock and pop singers tend to sing.

As you know, most British singers in pop and rock music use an American accent, or a sort of part-British hybrid, with a few Southern and AAVE elements thrown in. So I cherry-picked features based on personal habits and preferences. Keep in mind that this accent is only supposed to be used for singing.

I took inspiration from my favorite singers (which include Roger Daltrey, Ian Gillan, Rob Halford...), and from these pages:


Consonants

My Standard Pop Accent is non-rhotic. I find it easier to sing that way. /r/ is an alveolar approximant, as in England.

As in American English, /t/ is flapped between vowels, and sometimes deleted after /n/.

Present participles may have an alveolar nasal instead of the velar (that is, <-in'> instead of <-ing>), as in Southern accents.

As in British English, the yod is kept even after alveolars. This is a personal preference.


Vowels

As in AmE, I use the TRAP vowel in BATH. The TRAP vowel [æ] is an open front vowel rather than near-open; except before nasals, where it's a tense [ɛə].

LOT is normally [ɑ] (but see "the LOT conundrum" below). A close-to-cardinal [ɔː] serves for THOUGHT, CLOTH, NORTH and FORCE.

FACE and GOAT are narrow diphthongs [eɪ] and [oʊ] (easier to sing than the wide diphthongs [ɛɪ] and [əʊ] of Southern British English). FLEECE and GOOSE are near-monophthongs [iː] and [ʉː]. PRICE may also be a near-monophongal [aː], as in American Southern accents.

Weak syllables keep the distinction between [ɪ] and [ə] (the weak-vowel merger goes against my habits). Also, happY has the KIT vowel [ɪ], not the FLEECE one.

Everything else is pretty much what you'd expect.

KIT ɪ
DRESS ɛ
TRAP æ / ɛə
LOT ɑ
STRUT ɜ
FOOT ʊ
BATH æ / ɛə
CLOTH ɔː
NURSE əː
FLEECE iː
FACE eɪ
PALM ɑː
THOUGHT ɔː
GOAT oʊ
GOOSE ʉː
PRICE aɪ ∼ aː
CHOICE ɔɪ
MOUTH aʊ
NEAR ɪə ∼ ɪː
SQUARE ɛː
START ɑː
NORTH ɔː
FORCE ɔː
CURE ʊː

happY ɪ
lettER ə
commA ə


The LOT conundrum

There's one thing I'm really not sure about: the LOT vowel. Specifically, its relationship with START. Non-rhoticity combined with the father-bother merger means that LOT and START are merged, which I find... odd. Somehow, having hot and heart, god and guard as homophones doesn't sit right with me.

How do non-rhotic Americans, such as New Yorkers and AAVE speakers, deal with this potential homophony? My sources are conflicted about this. According to some of them, there is at least a potential distiction between LOT having a more central [ɑ̈], and START a truly back [ɑ:]. But I would find it hard to make a four-way distinction between [æ, a:, ɑ̈, ɑ:] (for TRAP, PRICE, LOT, START).

To take an example: listen to You Give Love a Bad Name (shut up), particularly to the phrase "Shot through the heart". The singer uses a non-rhotic pronunciation, yet I don't think he has the same vowel in shot and heart. (He's from New Jersey, yet is rhotic in real life).


Last edited by Ryusenshi on Thu Oct 12, 2017 2:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Apr 17, 2017 4:41 pm 
Sanci
Sanci
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jan 15, 2011 5:14 pm
Posts: 67
Location: Desert Hot Springs, CA
To my ear (though notoriously of tin), the difference between "hot" and non-rhotic "heart" is simply one of length: hot has /a/ and heart has /a:/.

_________________
(Avatar is an electric motor consisting of a bit of wire, a couple of paper clips,
two neodymium magnets, and a pair of AA batteries. A very cute demo of
minimal technology, and likewise completely useless for any practical purpose.)


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 2 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group