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Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2012 9:31 am
by Skomakar'n
Timmytiptoe wrote:In Dutch it works the same as German: softijs.

Swedish too (somebody has probably already said it on any of the two pages I was too lazy to look at, but whatever). Had no idea about the Icelandic blandaður ís, so thanks for that, vecfaranti!

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 11:47 am
by linguoboy
Today is pie day. I'm going to knock off early and make a pumpkin pie with a cookie crust. When my partner comes home, he'll take the pie dough from the refrigerator, where it's been resting overnight, roll it out, and fill it with mincemeat. He'll take the trimmings from fitting it to a pie pan, put them on a cookie sheet, sprinkle them with cinnamon and sugar, and bake them up separately.

Does anyone have a name for this treat? It seems like there should be one, but I've never heard it and I've been eating them since childhood.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 11:51 am
by ol bofosh
Mincemeat? Sounds a bit like Mince pie to me. Or a variant.

I suppose you don't mean minced meat.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 12:36 pm
by linguoboy
ol bofosh wrote:Mincemeat? Sounds a bit like Mince pie to me. Or a variant.

I suppose you don't mean minced meat.

Clearly I've confused you with too much background detail. I'm asking about the scraps of dough, not the pie itself.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 12:56 pm
by hwhatting
linguoboy wrote:Clearly I've confused you with too much background detail. I'm asking about the scraps of dough, not the pie itself.

Pieces of dough sprinkled with stuff and baked? Ain't that what you call cookies? If that's good enough for this guy, why isn't it for you? ;-)

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 1:05 pm
by linguoboy
hwhatting wrote:
linguoboy wrote:Clearly I've confused you with too much background detail. I'm asking about the scraps of dough, not the pie itself.

Pieces of dough sprinkled with stuff and baked? Ain't that what you call cookies? If that's good enough for this guy, why isn't it for you? ;-)

Cookie Monster has little time for discriminating between the multifarious varieties of baked sweets in this world. Some of the rest of us are a bit more discerning.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 1:26 pm
by hwhatting
linguoboy wrote:Cookie Monster has little time for discriminating between the multifarious varieties of baked sweets in this world. Some of the rest of us are a bit more discerning.

Well, then I'd call them "pie-leftover-dough cinnamon cookies". Gut so?

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Wed Nov 21, 2012 1:31 pm
by linguoboy
hwhatting wrote:
linguoboy wrote:Cookie Monster has little time for discriminating between the multifarious varieties of baked sweets in this world. Some of the rest of us are a bit more discerning.

Well, then I'd call them "pie-leftover-dough cinnamon cookies". Gut so?

Some of the suggestions I've gotten elsewhere include "twigs", "dickie birds", and "pie crust cookies". Some people apparently roll them up after sprinkling and slice them, yielding "pie crust pinwheels" (if sliced thin) or "pie crust cinnamon rolls" (if thick). I kind of like the idea of rolling them into mini-crescents and calling them "white trash rugelach".

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 2:04 pm
by linguoboy
So Wiktionary apparently thinks that "shit disturber" is a Canadianism. Really? I've been hearing it all my life hear in the American Midwest. What other words do people use?

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 2:09 pm
by Viktor77
linguoboy wrote:So Wiktionary apparently thinks that "shit disturber" is a Canadianism. Really? I've been hearing it all my life hear in the American Midwest. What other words do people use?


What? I've never heard this word ever.

Maybe you just dated yourself? :P

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 2:15 pm
by Travis B.
This is the first time I have heard the term shit disturber in that sense. I can easily picture someone saying to disturb shit, but that has a markedly different meaning to me, meaning to literally disturb items (e.g. to be needlessly touching items or moving items around). In the sense indicated by Wiktionary I am much more familiar with the term to stir shit (up), even though the term shit stirrer (which is less familiar to me than the aforementioned verb phrase) is supposedly British according to Wiktionary.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 2:21 pm
by Travis B.
Viktor77 wrote:
linguoboy wrote:So Wiktionary apparently thinks that "shit disturber" is a Canadianism. Really? I've been hearing it all my life hear in the American Midwest. What other words do people use?


What? I've never heard this word ever.

Maybe you just dated yourself? :P


I should note that the Midwest is by no means homogeneous. Just because it may not be used much up in, say, Wisconsin or Michigan does not mean it is not used elsewhere in the Midwest.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 3:27 pm
by linguoboy
Travis B. wrote:I should note that the Midwest is by no means homogeneous. Just because it may not be used much up in, say, Wisconsin or Michigan does not mean it is not used elsewhere in the Midwest.

Yeah, I hesitate to use the term at all, it's so damned vague, but there isn't really a better way of saying "parts of Missouri and Illinois and maybe Minnesota and Indiana".

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 3:32 pm
by Viktor77
linguoboy wrote:
Travis B. wrote:I should note that the Midwest is by no means homogeneous. Just because it may not be used much up in, say, Wisconsin or Michigan does not mean it is not used elsewhere in the Midwest.

Yeah, I hesitate to use the term at all, it's so damned vague, but there isn't really a better way of saying "parts of Missouri and Illinois and maybe Minnesota and Indiana".


That...that doesn't make any sense. You did this:
Huh.PNG
Huh.PNG (170.33 KiB) Viewed 1751 times

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 3:44 pm
by linguoboy
Viktor77 wrote:
linguoboy wrote:
Travis B. wrote:I should note that the Midwest is by no means homogeneous. Just because it may not be used much up in, say, Wisconsin or Michigan does not mean it is not used elsewhere in the Midwest.

Yeah, I hesitate to use the term at all, it's so damned vague, but there isn't really a better way of saying "parts of Missouri and Illinois and maybe Minnesota and Indiana".

That...that doesn't make any sense. You did this:

No, Viktor, you did that. It doesn't reflect what I said at all.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 4:39 pm
by Travis B.
/facepalm

Just because someone has been in part of a state does not mean that they have had contact with that state in general at all. For instance, I speak a lot about Wisconsin, but I am really speaking about Milwaukee and, more specifically, Wauwatosa (and even though I lived in Madison I was there just as a student, and many of the people there were actually originally from the Milwaukee area).

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 5:37 pm
by Viktor77
Travis B. wrote:/facepalm

Just because someone has been in part of a state does not mean that they have had contact with that state in general at all. For instance, I speak a lot about Wisconsin, but I am really speaking about Milwaukee and, more specifically, Wauwatosa (and even though I lived in Madison I was there just as a student, and many of the people there were actually originally from the Milwaukee area).


Yes, but how can he justify a dialectal variation in a bunch of bordering states and then one non-bordering state? What was there some diaspora to Minnesota?

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 5:49 pm
by Travis B.
/facepalm

Because language change is not nearly as regular of a process as some would like to believe it as. Past isoglosses can easily be broken up by future changes, resulting in past innovations getting spread out in discontiguous areas.

And do not forget that we only live in small corners of the Midwest (I for one cannot speak for much of Wisconsin outside of Milwaukee, and you cannot speak for much of Michigan outside Saginaw), which still leaves large portions of the Midwest for this feature to be found in without them even having to be discontiguous!

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 6:44 pm
by Boşkoventi
linguoboy wrote:No, Viktor, you did that. It doesn't reflect what I said at all.

Actually it does, if only a little. (You mentioned specific states.) But remember it's Viktor you're dealing with. :-)

Viktor77 wrote:
Travis B. wrote:/facepalm

Just because someone has been in part of a state does not mean that they have had contact with that state in general at all. For instance, I speak a lot about Wisconsin, but I am really speaking about Milwaukee and, more specifically, Wauwatosa (and even though I lived in Madison I was there just as a student, and many of the people there were actually originally from the Milwaukee area).


Yes, but how can he justify a dialectal variation in a bunch of bordering states and then one non-bordering state? What was there some diaspora to Minnesota?

*smacks Vikkie upside the head*

Obvious point is obvious: LB never said that the term does not occur in Iowa or Wisconsin. (In point of fact: he did not say anything about them.) He may simply not have any data (experiences, observations) for those areas.

Need an example? I could list all the states where I've heard people pronounce /{m {n/ as [e@m e@n] (the normal American pronunciation AFAICT), but there are plenty of states I have not been to, and therefore cannot report on. Does this mean the feature does not occur in those states? (Hint: It does not.)

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Mon May 06, 2013 9:23 pm
by Radius Solis
"Shit disturber" is part of my active vocabulary; I hesitate to speak for the region, though. I have the feeling that it's a mom phrase, so I may have picked it up from her and might be atypical for using it.

However, my sense of what it means differs slightly from what Wiktionary offers. Rather than only the negative "troublemaker" sense of definition 1, I also use it more positively, e.g. for people who stir up trouble for a good reason. Activists, whistleblowers, those who refuse to behave like sheeple, those who call it as they see it even if it's going to bother someone. I can recall having once called Brel a shit disturber. I had intended it as a compliment. Now that I see others might take it as mainly negative, I hope (seven years down the road) that she didn't take it too far amiss. :(

That said, trolls and senseless troublemakers count as "shit disturbers" to me too.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Tue May 07, 2013 1:41 am
by clawgrip
Having grown up in Canada, I can say I have definitely heard shit-disturber, but only in the negative sense listed on Wiktionary.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Wed May 08, 2013 12:40 pm
by Drydic
Do you guys mean that shit starter isn't the normal term for this?

ʘ_ʘ

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Thu May 09, 2013 5:38 am
by clawgrip
I've never heard shit starter.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Thu May 09, 2013 9:09 am
by ol bofosh
Shit stirrer! I knew there was a similar phrase. Shit stirrer... my dad used that a lot.

Re: What do you call this?

Posted: Thu May 09, 2013 5:17 pm
by ZMoring
Drydic Guy wrote:Do you guys mean that shit starter isn't the normal term for this?

ʘ_ʘ


I've heard that before. I don't remember where, but I've definitely heard that before.