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PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2016 6:05 pm 
Smeric
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http://www.tofugu.com/japanese/japanese-punctuation/
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If you see this smaller version of the hiragana つ, it is not pronounced "tsu" (ever!). […] If you see it at the end of a word (before the particle と in many onomatopoeia) then it's a glottal stop. That means it's kind of like a constricted sound in your throat (that's your glottis in there, thus the name). The katakana version looks like this ッ.


True or not?

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2016 6:10 pm 
Smeric
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I seem to remember reading that it makes the preceding vowel shorter, but yeah, that's probably true.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2016 9:19 pm 
Smeric
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True at the end of an utterance. Utterance-final short vowels are generally followed a glottal stop anyway, but this makes it more "emphatic" like maybe a shorter vowel, exaggerated intonation, audible breathy release of the glottal stop, etc.

When followed by another consonant it's just a geminate though.

I just happened to see a perfect example so I took a picture. You can see they Romanized ぐるっと as grutto ("guru" to "gru" is just to make ir Englishy though). Anyway, just a geminate.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2016 7:54 am 
Sumerul
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It's weird when they do it with a voiced consonant, though, like レッド or キッズ because then it sounds like a glottal stop again [reʔdo] or [kiʔdzu] or maybe an unreleased voiceless consonant, or the voicing just disappears. Like it's definitely not a geminate [red:o] in this case.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2016 10:16 am 
Smeric
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Wouldn't [kiʔdzu] be キッヅ?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2016 5:46 pm 
Smeric
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ヅ and ズ are pronounced identically as /zu/. The distinction between them is lost. Standard transliterations from English into katakana rarely use ヅ, and on the rare occasion they do (and I can't think of any), it's a stylistic choice. The standard way to render "kids" is キッズ, but this is clearly not pronounced [kiz:u]; it's much more like what finlay indicated.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2016 11:06 pm 
Lebom
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See The Phonetics of sokuon, or geminate obstruents, by Shigeto Kawahara, and specifically sections 5.3 & 5.4

The summary is that a some have argued in the past that geminates in Japanese involve some form of glottal or laryngeal constriction. But a few others recently found no evidence for any such constriction.

So the answer for now is that no, obstruent geminates in Japanese don't involve full glottal stops.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2016 10:12 am 
Sumerul
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the paragraph ends with "still to be explored" though, and the first section starts with "it would be interesting to investigate ..." – these are unsubtle code words that mean "we don't know"


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