[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 483: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 379: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/bbcode.php on line 112: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is no longer supported, use preg_replace_callback instead
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/functions.php on line 4752: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at [ROOT]/includes/functions.php:3887)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/functions.php on line 4754: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at [ROOT]/includes/functions.php:3887)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/functions.php on line 4755: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at [ROOT]/includes/functions.php:3887)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/functions.php on line 4756: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at [ROOT]/includes/functions.php:3887)
zompist bboard • View topic - A quick intro to Classical Music

zompist bboard

THIS IS AN ARCHIVE ONLY - see Ephemera
It is currently Sun Dec 15, 2019 9:11 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 35 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 6:43 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world
Intentions and Terms

I thought I’d write a brief introduction to Classical Music, because... well, I didn’t really get that far into the thought. I guess because lots of people ask where to start and what they might like – and maybe some people here might appreciate a few words of guidance. If not, maybe writing it will clarify my thoughts for the next time someone does actually ask me. It seems that there’s a lot of curiosity about classical music these days, but not a lot of remaining knowledge in the general community, so...

To be clear, I’m not a professional musician, critic, music historian, music theorist, or anything along those lines. I’m just a lifelong classical music fan, and I probably know a lot more about the subject than the average non-expert person these days does.
And to begin with, we need to define ‘classical music’. For some people, that means anything ever written that doesn’t have a popstar singing in it (and maybe some things that do). For others, it means specifically music composed by the artistic establishment of western Europe between 1730 and 1820 – or possibly only 1750 to 1792.

For my purposes, I’ll split the difference, and identify “classical music” with what normally springs to mind with those words: music of the so-called “Common Practice Period”, which is to say approximately AD 1600 to AD 1900 in Europe, and to a lesser extent in European colonies, particularly in the New World. [There are no exact dates; some people would push the beginning up to 1650, for example]. Almost all the composers or pieces you might think of as “classical” fall within this period, or is later music consciously imitating it. I’ll also, however, make some remarks on earlier and later developments.

My original intention here was to write a few brief words on the background leading up to the Common Practice, write a brief description of the three Eras within this Period (Baroque, Classical and Romantic (note that ‘Era’ and ‘Period’ can sometimes be swapped, as terms), followed by a brief explanation of the major genres of Common Practice music, and then a rough run-down of some major names to look out for in approximate tiers of importance.
However, my initial brief words have turned out... not to be. So... it may take me a little while to get through this. Nonetheless, I’m still hoping for it to be pretty brief, rather than an in-depth description. [this will necessitate some unfair simplifications along the way, needless to say]
In the meantime, if you have any questions about anything (that I’ve said, or that you’d like me to say), or want to correct me, or just have anything to add yourself, please do.

[Oh, and to get it out of the way, the #1 shibboleth for classical vs pop fans: if in any doubt at all, call it a “piece”, not a “song”. This may not be objectively important, but it’s the easiest way to signal that you’re actually taking the genre seriously (and avoids triggering the PTSD of all us poor classical music fans who have been repeatedly asked “what’s your favourite song?” and have had no idea how to answer...)]

Anyway, because things rarely make sense unless you know where they came from, I’ll start with a little narrative explanation of how we got to the point where classical music started...

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 6:48 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world
Before the Common Practice: The Mediaeval Period


Recap and audio links

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 9:46 am 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2004 4:31 pm
Posts: 1733
Location: 가매

_________________
| |


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 08, 2017 9:18 am 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world
Before the Common Practice: the Renaissance


Recap and audio links

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 11:56 am 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world
The Baroque



Recap and audio links

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 12:55 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 11, 2012 9:50 am
Posts: 1611
What is Common Practice?

_________________
The conlanger formerly known as “the conlanger formerly known as Pole, the”.

If we don't study the mistakes of the future we're doomed to repeat them for the first time.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 2:34 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 19, 2008 1:55 am
Posts: 1542
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia / Colombie Britannique, Canada

_________________


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:02 pm 
Avisaru
Avisaru
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 9:01 am
Posts: 335
Location: Just outside Hamburg, Germany


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:25 pm 
Avisaru
Avisaru
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 9:01 am
Posts: 335
Location: Just outside Hamburg, Germany


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:29 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:40 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 5:45 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 10, 2017 5:52 am 
Avisaru
Avisaru
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 11:17 pm
Posts: 432
I was kind of hoping this would be a link to Britten's Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra :P

_________________
Duxirti petivevoumu tinaya to tiei šuniš muruvax ulivatimi naya to šizeni.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 14, 2017 6:49 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world
Sorry to disappoint.

The Classical Era


Recap and audio links:


Note to self: "recaps" shouldn't be longer than what they recap...


Also, a note on the weird letters and numbers in the titles of pieces...
Composers wrote lots of pieces of music, which makes it hard to identify which piece is meant (particularly when translating between languages, and particularly when many 'names' are taken as descriptions that are partly subjective). This was particularly a problem in the Classical, when composers were insanely productive, but mostly in a small number of genres. Haydn has at least 104 symphonies, for example. "Symphony in A" isn't enough to identify them.
One way to deal with that is to number the symphonies. But early composers tended not to number their symphonies themselves, and as symphonies reached different publishers and concert halls in different orders, there was no definitive, objective order to number them in. Composers didn't set out to write, nor did impressarios advertise, their "fourteenth symphony" - they just advertised "so-and-so's latest symphony!" Later scholars can number the works, but sometimes doing so conflicts with an existing established numbering. Haydn's symphonies, for instance, are numbered, but the traditional numbering is not chronological - because, as the privately-employed composer grew more famous, he published "new" symphonies that were actually things he'd written years or decades earlier but that hadn't previously been performed publically. Some composers/publishers even, duplicitously, published the same work twice with different names or numbers. Besides, numbering within a genre runs into the problem of defining genres - is it a sinfonia, or a symphony, or sinfonia concertante, or a concerto grosso, or a concertante symphony, or...?

So, scholars of particular composers went back and constructed would-be comprehensive catalogues of exactly what was written, attaching a number to each work. Most of these catalogues are chronological, or attempt to be, but some instead categorise by genre. Unfortunately, different scholars came up with different catalogues - a new piece was discovered, or an old piece realised to be misattributed, or, in chronological catalogues, a piece realised to be associated with the wrong composition dates, and so forth. [originally, these catalogues were drawn up ad hoc by biographers as appendices; later, writers had to include not only lists of works but also complicated conversion tables to explain how their list corresponded to all the lists in all the other biographies]. To make things slightly clearly, catalogue numbers are therefore accompanied by an abbreviation to indicate the catalogue. Fortunately, for most composers a particular catalogue has achieved predominance.

So, for instance, there are half a dozen modern ways of counting Bach's works (and thus working out which "Toccata in D" or "Prelude in E" somebody means), but in practice one virtually only ever sees things listed with a "BWV number" (Bach-Werke-Verzeichnis). Similarly, Mozart's works are almost always identified by their K-number (for Koechel). More obscurely, for example, William Friedemann Bach gets Fk (Falk) numbers, while CPE Bach gets Wq (Wotquenne) numbers. Vivaldi gets RV numbers, for "Ryom-Verzeichnis".



This tends to only be an issue in the Baroque and the Classical. Before that, nobody cares enough, and not enough is really known, so things tend to be identified by what book they were published in originally (so far as we know). Kind of like referring to pop songs bytheir name and what album they first appeared on. During the Classical, publishers began attaching "opus numbers" - their own numbering of published works. Opus numbers, written "Op.", have two potential problems - first, not everything got formally published; and, second, things aren't always published in a logical order, or may even be published with two numbers. However, as time went on, opus numbers got to be a more and more reliable way of identifying works, so they're the default for Romantic, and many modern composers. [later, Op numbers stopped being tied strictly to publishing schedules, and composers assigned their own Op. numbers, effectively as part of the name of the piece]. Beethoven straddles that line, so most of his works get an opus number, but there are enough that he never published that there are also many works with "WoO" numbers instead (Werke ohne Opuszahl), referring to a scholarly catalogue of unpublished works (Fuer Elise is WoO 59 (and occasionally Bia 515)). Schubert didn't publish much while alive, so he gets D numbers. Dvorak didn't publish all his stuff, but more particularly his publishers really dicked everyone around with what numbers they gave things, so his works are often known by B numbers. Debussy was all hipster and didn't like labels man so he refused to give his works opus numbers, so now everything has to be labelled with L numbers. Etc. But for most composers, it's "Op."

[notably, opus numbers don't always refer to a single piece, when several pieces were published in a single omnibus edition, in which case the pieces are known by "opus" and then "number".

Thus, one sonata by Beethoven may interchangeably be known as "the Moonlight" (nicknames were a common early way of being clear which piece you were talking about), the "Quasi una fantasia" (the subtitle he gave the piece, but confusingly also to another piece, so this is ambiguous, but everyone knows which one you mean), "Piano Sonata in C# minor" (or C#-moll), "Piano Sonata no. 14", "Opus 27, number 2", or any combination of the above. Probably ideally "Piano Sonata no. 14 in C#-minor "Quasi una fantasia", Op. 27 no. 2 ("Moonlight")". ]

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 9:02 am 
Smeric
Smeric

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 2:49 am
Posts: 2316
Location: Bonn, Germany


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 11:49 am 
Avisaru
Avisaru
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 9:01 am
Posts: 335
Location: Just outside Hamburg, Germany
Oddly enough, for some reason, I've always thought of Beethoven as von Beethoven, but I've always thought of Schiller just as Schiller.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 12:06 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2017 12:12 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 4:27 am 
Smeric
Smeric

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 2:49 am
Posts: 2316
Location: Bonn, Germany
@Sal: Honestly, I don't care either way on the "von" issue, I just wanted to inform you about current attitudes in Germany. Part of that attitude is "if you were born into that silly caste, have fun with it, but any self-respecting non-aristocrat should reject being coopted into that caste". Anyway, nobody is stripping any titles from anyone officially, it's about how people usually refer to those artists and writers. As I said, Gluck is normally referred to as Gluck or Christoph Willibald Gluck, without "Ritter" or "von".*1)
There's the added complication that "von" may not always be a predicate of nobility; like the "van" in Beethoven's name (who is either "Beethoven" or "Ludwig van Beethoven", but rarely "van Beethoven" and almost never "Ludwig Beethoven"), there is also "von" as an indicator of origin in commoner names. Anyways, Lars von Trier is usually reffered to either by his full name, by "von Trier" or by "Trier" (the last may be a rarer due to the possible confusion with the city of the same name, which also makes it difficult to compare Google hits). As French de has the same issues and people often don't know whether de is or isn't a predicate of nobility in a specific case, it's all over the place.
Concerning titles, the line between what is seen as either respect of titles or as fawning spittle-licking, depending on your viewpoint, is addressing people with "Herr / Frau" plus title (e.g. Herr Baron = respect / fawning) or "Herr / Frau" plus last name (including any von's) - e.g. Herr von Münchhausen = disrespect / the normal way to address anyone).
Talking about knighted Brits, Germans may or may not use the "Sir", but people would normally leave it out - it's mostly e.g. "Richard Attenborough"; if a German uses "Sir Richard Attenborough", it's a sign of a certain anglophilia or showing off one's knowledge of the English title system (these two reasons may overlap). As for American presidents, my (non-verified) impression is that the usage of "Präsident Clinton" / "Bill Clinton" / "Clinton" is distributed the same way as their English equivalents.
*1) Additional note: if you look at German sources from the 19th / early 20th century, you'll notice that in aristocratic circles it was usual to drop the "von" - it was understood. An aristocrat would use it only when introducing himself in circles where his status was unknown. Insisting on the "von" in your name among nobles marked you as an upstart, using the "von" referring to nobles marked you as a commoner.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:14 pm 
Lebom
Lebom
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 12, 2017 3:31 am
Posts: 189
Location: Montrouge, France


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:49 pm 
Smeric
Smeric
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 6:44 am
Posts: 1998
Location: suburbs of Mrin
Thanks for posting this! I learned a lot.

_________________
ìtsanso, God In The Mountain, may our names inspire the deepest feelings of fear in urkos and all his ilk, for we have saved another man from his lies! I welcome back to the feast hall kal, who will never gamble again! May the eleven gods bless him!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 12:11 pm 
Avisaru
Avisaru
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2002 9:01 am
Posts: 335
Location: Just outside Hamburg, Germany


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:25 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world
Thank you.

Note that I've decided to put the next split in possibly the "wrong" place, a bit early, so at to be able to do the end of romanticism and modernism all together.

The Romantic



Illustrations


(NB - Mahler and Rachmaninov should chronologically go in the next post, but I mention them here as, as it were, late culminations of earlier trends)

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2017 12:32 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world
Modernism




Ilustrations


*exhales*
well that was longer than I expected.

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2017 3:30 pm 
Sanno
Sanno
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2004 5:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: One of the dark places of the world
So, to recap:

Baroque:
Split between very simple popular music and polyphonic religious music; over time the polyphone comes back into the popular stuff and it gets really complicated. Other common features include strong, but unnuanced emotions (very happy happy, very sad sad), vocal virtuosity, rapid harmonic progressions, long melodies. Tend to be small ensembles, with weaker instruments (if you're hearing a period instrument performance).

Classical:
Emphasis on symmetry. Simple harmonies; short, 'balanced' melodies. Generally 'modern' instruments and ensembles (though the harpsichord is still around at this point alongside the early piano), but everything is smaller and weaker.

Romantic:
Becomes 'richer'. Bigger ensembles, richer timbres. Increasing use of more unusual harmonies.


I also thought I'd share a couple of amusing youtube clips that seem relevent. First, and even more so seek to demonstrate that if you re-orchestrate Shostakovich for electric guitars, what you get is kind of death metal.

More seriously, and are pleasant little mash-ups of around 100 classical tunes (or bits of them) in a bit over 10 minutes, playing over the top of one another. It seems like a fun and quite impressive little bit of messing about, but it actually demonstrates something very serious. The reason you can superimpose fragments of everyone from Pachelbel through to Scott Joplin over the top of one another and still have something that sounds nice is because they are all following the Common Practice. What they're all doing is building a harmonic progression (sometimes very simple indeed) according to certain rules, in a certain given set of scales and rhythmic patterns, and then finding melodies that fit within and define for the listener (in mandated ways) those harmonic progressions. This means that you can pretty easily match up snippets of harmony between composers, and the chances are good that the melodies will harmonise with one another (since they're harmonising with the same harmonic framework). Sure, you may have a bit of a different rhythm when Joplin comes in (likewise a lot of early Baroque composers, absent here, from an era when syncopation was also fashionable), and you may need to throw in more accidentals (deviations from the normal keys) for the Romantics, but all of these guys are basically playing by the same rules. You could also add in tunes from most modern popular music, and a lot of jazz. Notably, however, you couldn't combine this music anything like as easily with mediaeval or (for the most part) renaissance polyphony, or with 20th century modernism; you also couldn't do it with, say, Indian or Chinese or Indonesian traditional music - because there again we're outside the Common Practice.

_________________
Blog:

But the river tripped on her by and by, lapping
as though her heart was brook: Why, why, why! Weh, O weh
I'se so silly to be flowing but I no canna stay!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 35 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group