What do you call this?

Discussion of natural languages, or language in general.
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Viktor77
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What do you call this?

Post by Viktor77 »

I thought there was a dialectal vocabulary thread around but I couldn't find it. Anyway, what do you call this?

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For me in Eastern Michigan it's a Twisty, and there's even a store here called Tracey's Twisties. But apparently, in Western Michigan they call it a Twister. Or so I am lead to believe from experience.
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finlay
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by finlay »

Disgusting fake ice cream that's half chocolate and half vanilla "flavour".

(ie, I don't have a name for it)

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by vec »

Why "fake"? That's what you get if you have vanilla in one box and chocolate in the other and you pull the middle handle (out of three) on the ice cream machine. We call it "blandaður ís" or mixed ice cream.
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finlay
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by finlay »

Fake because it's clearly come out of a machine.

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Thomas Winwood
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Thomas Winwood »

No special word for it, I've never even seen mestizo ice-cream like that before.

I don't mind smooth ice-cream like that, but that does look like a particularly vile and unappetising example.

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Taernsietr »

finlay probably thought it is CG, plastic or some sort of candy.

In BP (Rio de Janeiro, anyway) this is called a casquinha mista, which literally means "mixed little crust". Any sort of pastry filled with ice cream is called casquinha here. Vanilla flavour is called "creme" and chocolate... well.

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Bob Johnson »

Ice ... cream?

Or frozen yogurt. It's hard to tell which type of processed food-like product that's supposed to be.

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Declan »

Never seen anything like that, but this is a cone (ice-cream cone really I suppose), or a ninety-nine, from it's (historic) price, particularly if it has a chocolate flake.
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by linguoboy »

I don't have a name for it IMD. I pretty much never have any cause to refer to soft-serve ice cream.

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ná'oolkiłí
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by ná'oolkiłí »

The dish doesn't have a special name—just soft serve in a cone. I call the flavor swirl or twist.

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by ---- »

An ice cream cone, of course

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Pthagnar »

finlay wrote:Fake because it's clearly come out of a machine.

scotland has no need of freezers

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by King of My Own Niche »

I call it Chocolate-Vanilla ice cream. I try to avoid it, opting for plain vanilla instead. I have never heard anyone refer to at as a "Twisty" or the like.
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by cromulant »

I call it an "ice cream cone," or a "soft-serve ice cream cone" if I need to distinguish it from a "regular ice cream cone."

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Yng »

It might just about fall under 'ninety-nine'.
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Lyhoko Leaci »

cromulant wrote:I call it an "ice cream cone," or a "soft-serve ice cream cone" if I need to distinguish it from a "regular ice cream cone."


To me, it is a regular ice cream cone.

(Chocolate-vanilla) Swirl to be specific, or squirrel if I'm feeling silly at the time.
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Ziz »

I don't call that anything less vague than ice cream, except for maybe soft-serve.

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Astraios »

That is a "*vomit* machine ice cream which probably tastes metallic and slimy and why the fuck is there so much ice cream in such a tiny cone surely it's just going to fall off or melt before you get halfway".

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by MisterBernie »

An abomination unto the LORD.

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Shm Jay »

Twist, I think. Oklahoma doesn't have a lot of Dairy Queen's or soft-serve ice-cream place. Braum's is good, but sometimes you want a soft ice cream cone. The nearest Dairy Queen is in Chickasha, which isn't too far away from me (30 min) but there’s not much of a reason to go to Chickasha.

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Qwynegold »

I'm not sure what to call it in English. Soft cone? Anyway, in Swedish it's mjukglass (soft ice cream) and in Finnish pehmis. Or were you referring to the mix of two flavours?

EDIT: Funny that so many think lowly of that type of ice cream. Over here it's considered a rare treat; the best kind of ice cream.
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by vec »

In Iceland, icecream "ís" is soft-serve like that by default. You can only get the gelato-kind you take up with scoops at two or three places.
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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Acid Badger »

In German that's a Softeis (yeah, soft-), as oppsed to normal Eis(creme).

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Jipí »

I think he might rather mean the disgusting ice cream that comes in liter boxes from the supermarket? Especially disgusting if it's cheap-ass "White Brands" like Ja and stuff :?

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Re: What do you call this?

Post by Timmytiptoe »

In Dutch it works the same as German: softijs.

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