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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 8:48 am 
Sanci
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Hi !
We have a February topic. So why not doing one about names of month that don't come from the too famous latin names...
I discovered years ago, that croatian (but not serbian) uses typical names for months and after that, I've found a quite nice list. Sometimes latin and typical names are used both, sometimes not. Somtimes also, latin and typical names coexist. find latin name, it's quite easy !!!
Correct me if there are errors...

This is what I have:

Croatian Serbian uses latin names
siječanj, veljača, o?ujak, travanj, svibanj, lipanj, srpanj, kolovoz, rujan, listopad, studeni, prosinac

Slovenian Also uses latin names
prosinec, svečan, ?u?ec, mali traven, veliki traven, ro?nik, mali srpan, veliki srpan, kimovec, vinotok, listopad, gruden

Czech
leden, ?nor, březen, duben, květen, červen, červenec, srpen, z?ř?, ř?jen, listopad, prosinec

Polish
styczeń, luty, marzec, kwiecień, maj, czerwiec, lipiec, sierpień, wrzesień, październik, listopad, grudzień

Byelorussian
cтyдзeнь, люты, caкaвiк, кpacaвiк, тpaвeнь, чэpвeнь, лiпeнь, жнивeнь, вepaceнь, кacтpычнiк, лicтaпaд, cьнeжaнь

Ukrainian also uses lat(in names
ciчeнь, лютий, бepeзeнь, квiтeнь, тpaвeнь, чepвeнь, лiпeнь, cepпeнь, вepeceнь, жoвтeнь, лиcтoпaд, гpyдeнь

Lithuanian but Latvian uses latin names
sausis, vasaris, kovas, balandis, gegu?ė, bir?elis, liepas, rugpjūtis, rugsėjis, spalis, lapkritis, gruodis

Albanian
kallnuer, fruar/shkurt, mars, prill, maj, qershor, korrik, gusht, shtator, tetor, n?ntor, dhjetor/fruer

Euskera
urtarril, otsail, martxo, apiril, maiatz, ekain, uztail, abuztu, irail, urri, azaro, abendu

Breton
genver, c'houevrer, meurzh, ebrel, mae, mezheven, gouere (?), eost, gwangolo, here, du, kerzu

Welsh
ionawr, chwefror, mawrth, ebrill, mai, mehefin, gorphenaf, awst, medi, hydref, tachwedd, rhagfyr

Irish
ean?ir, feabhra, m?rta, aibre?n, bealtaine, meitheamh, i?il, l?nasa, me?n f?mhair, deireadh, f?mhair, samhain, nollaig

Scottish Gaelic
faoilteach, gearran, m?rt, giblean, c?itean, t-?g-mhios, t-iuchar (?), l?nasdal, t-sultainn, damhar, t-samhainn, d?dlachd

French In use during the French Revolution and Napoleon's Empire. Called "Republican Calendary"
niv?se, pluvi?se, vent?se, germinal, flor?al, prairial, messidor, thermidor, fructidor, vend?miaire, brumaire, frimaire
Being French, I'd like to use those names again... although I'm not particularily fan of Napoleon !!!

Romanian Uses latin names but these names also existed, they sometimes strangely remember Republican Calendary... would it be inspired by it?
gerar (?) (could be made on "januarium" or "ger" (freeze), făurar, mărţişor, prier, florar, cireşar, cuptor, secerar, vinicer, brumar, frunzar, ningău

Turkish
ocak, şubat, mart, nisan, mayıs, haziran, temmuz, ağustos, eyl?l, ekim, kasım, aralık

Uzbek Also uses Muslim calendar
jaddi, dalv, hut, hamal, savr, javzo, seraton, asat, sumbula, mezon, aqrab, qavs

Kazakh Idem
qangtar, aqpan, naw?r?z, k?kek, mam?r, maws?m, shilde, tamez, qerk?yek, qazan, qarasha, jeltoqsan

Khowar/Chitrali
pheting, ghor ghor, aliyan, shadagh, boye, ronzuk, yugh, muzhe, khumpach, kishman, chanchori, thungshal

Finnish
tammikuu, helmikuu, maaliskuu, huhtikuu, toukokuu, kes?kuu, hein?kuu, elokuu, syyskuu, lokakuu, marraskuu, joulukuu

Can someone complete this list?? I know some language like Japanese or Chinese have other systems too but it's just too much, I've limited my search to Europe and some little part of Asia....
We can also start to speak about it, and try to compare/explain etymologies etc etc. I think it can be interesting, don't you think too?

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 9:06 am 
Sanno
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Nikura wrote:
Can someone complete this list?? I know some language like Japanese or Chinese have other systems too but it's just too much, I've limited my search to Europe and some little part of Asia....
We can also start to speak about it, and try to compare/explain etymologies etc etc. I think it can be interesting, don't you think too?

Somewhere in my notes, I have the Upper and Lower Sorbian (a.k.a. Lusatian, Wendish) names as well.

The Chinese, Korean, and Japanese systems are quite prosaic: numeral + a reflex of Chinese 月 "moon; month" (Mandarin yue4, Korean wel, Japanese gatsu.) There are poetic names derived from flowers, ancient festivals, and the like, but I've never seen them used in modern texts.

You should add the ancient Germanic month names as well. There's a very complete treatment of them here. Note that Tolkien used the Anglo-Saxon names to create the Shire Calendar used by the Hobbits in his books.


Last edited by linguoboy on Fri Jun 10, 2005 11:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 9:21 am 
Avisaru
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Nikura wrote:
Euskera
urtarril, otsail, martxo, apiril, maiatz, ekain, uztail, abuztu, irail, urri, azaro, abendu

We can also start to speak about it, and try to compare/explain etymologies etc etc. I think it can be interesting, don't you think too?


Etymology:

urtarril from urta-barr(i)-hil (year-new-month)
otsail from otso-hil (wolf-month)
martxo from Romance
apiril from Romance
maiatz from Romance
ekain from eki (sun) + gain (top)
uztail from uzta (crop) + -(h)il (month)
abuztu: god knows. Could be a distorted Romance borrowing
irail from from ira (fern) + (h)il (month)
urri from ??? It means scarcity, poverty, so that could be its origin
azaro from hazaro (sowing time)
abendu from Lat. adventum

Most of those Etymologies are from the following online dictionary: http://www1.euskadi.net/morris/

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 10:34 am 
Avisaru
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North-S?mi has some quite nice names for the months. They originally had a moon calendar with 13 months but the current version is just a normal western calendar. The names for the 12 months are chosen from the original 13 though, sadly, I don't know what the 13th month was called. The month names are very much based on reindeer herding. Ending the month names you see the word m?nnu, "moon".

ođđajagim?nnu, January (ođđa = "new", jahki = "year")
guovvam?nnu, February (the beginning guovva is not found as an independent word)
njukčam?nnu, March (njukča = "swan")
cuoŋom?nnu, April (cuoŋo = snowdrift crusted so that it holds a human's and even reindeer's weight)
miessem?nnu, May (miessi = "new born reindeer" [I guess there's no English word for this])
geassem?nnu, June (geassi = "summer")
suoidnem?nnu, July (suoidni = "hay")
borgem?nnu, August (borgi = "new [reindeer] hair")
čakčam?nnu, September (čakča = "autumn")
golggotm?nnu, October (golggot = a male reindeer that's copulated itself into exhaustion) :)
sk?bmam?nnu, November (sk?bma = the time of year when the sun doesn't rise at all)
juovlam?nnu, December (juovllat = "Christmas")

Nikura wrote:
Finnish
tammikuu, helmikuu, maaliskuu, huhtikuu, toukokuu, kes?kuu, hein?kuu, elokuu, syyskuu, lokakuu, marraskuu, joulukuu


I see these are in need of some ethymologies. As with the S?mi months the Finnish month names all end with the word kuu, "moon", that's also commonly used as a shorter form of kuukausi, "month", in speech. The initial parts are:
tammi = "oak"
helmi = "pearl", propably referring to the shining snow of late winter time
maalis, not found as an independent word and I'm not aware of it's ethymology
huhti, same as above
touko, as older word for spring that isn't found independently, other that the month's name it's preserved in the compound toukoty?t, "spring time works at the field", and perhaps in some dialects
kes? = "summer"
hein? = "hay"
elo = "harvest", the word is actually derived from the verb el??, to live, with the more regular meaning "living"
syys, a compound form of the word syksy, "autumn"
loka = "mud"
marras, an older word for a certain kind of death
joulu = "Christmas"


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 11:12 am 
Lebom
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Posts: 110
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Nikura wrote:
Hi !
We have a February topic. So why not doing one about names of month that don't come from the too famous latin names...
I discovered years ago, that croatian (but not serbian) uses typical names for months and after that, I've found a quite nice list. Sometimes latin and typical names are used both, sometimes not. Somtimes also, latin and typical names coexist. find latin name, it's quite easy !!!
Correct me if there are errors...

This is what I have:

Croatian Serbian uses latin names
siječanj, veljača, o?ujak, travanj, svibanj, lipanj, srpanj, kolovoz, rujan, listopad, studeni, prosinac


I have trouble understanding what you mean. Croatian (or the Croatian version of Serbo-Croatian if you prefer) emphatically does not use Latin names, as the above list shows. Serbian (or the Serbian version of Serbo-Croatian) does use Latin names, as does Russian. The Serbian forms are januar, februar, mart, etc.


Nikura wrote:
Can someone complete this list?? I know some language like Japanese or Chinese have other systems too but it's just too much, I've limited my search to Europe and some little part of Asia....
We can also start to speak about it, and try to compare/explain etymologies etc etc. I think it can be interesting, don't you think too?


Hungarian uses good old Latin terms, suitably altered to fit Hungarian orthography: janu?r, febru?r, m?rcius, ?prilis, m?jus, j?nius, j?lius, augusztus, szeptember, okt?ber, november, december.

As has been pointed out, the far eastern languages just count months. In Japanese, it's ichigatsu (1-month), nigatsu (2-month) and so on.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 11:15 am 
Sanci
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Posts: 64
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Nikura wrote:
Croatian Serbian uses latin names
sijec<caron>anj, veljac<caron>a, oz<caron>ujak, travanj, svibanj, lipanj, srpanj, kolovoz, rujan, listopad, studeni, prosinac

Slovenian Also uses latin names
prosinec, svec<caron>an, s<caron>us<caron>ec, mali traven, veliki traven, roz<caron>nik, mali srpan, veliki srpan, kimovec, vinotok, listopad, gruden

Czech
leden, ?nor, br<caron>ezen, duben, kve<caron>ten, c<caron>erven, c<caron>ervenec, srpen, z?r<caron>?, r<caron>?jen, listopad, prosinec


Czech and Croatian prosinec/prosinac means "december" while Slovenian uses prosinec for "january"? Strange. :?

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 11:27 am 
Sanno
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gsandi wrote:
/*As has been pointed out, the far eastern languages just count months. In Japanese, it's ichigatsu (1-month), nigatsu (2-month) and so on.

D'OH! Wrong on-yomi in my post. I'll go take care of that now.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:11 pm 
Niš
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gach already gave the North Sami months; I can supply some of the others. Don't know the etymologies, unfortunately.

Western
Lule Sami: ?d?jakm?nno, guovvam?nno, sjnjuktjam?nno, vuoratjism?nno, moarmesm?nno, biehtsem?nno, sjnjilltjam?nno, b?rggem?nno, rag?tm?nno, g?lg?dism?nno, bas?dism?nno, javllam?nno
South Sami: ts?engele, goevte, njoktje, voerhtje, suehpede, ruffie, snjaltje, m?etske, sk?erede, golke, rahka, goeve

Eastern
Inari Sami: uđđ?ivem??nu, kuov?m??nu, njuhč?m??nu, cu?ŋuim??nu, vyesim??nu, kesim??nu, syeinim??nu, porgem??nu, čohč?m??nu, roovv?dm??nu, skamm?m??nu, juovl?m??nu
Skolt Sami: ođđee?jjm??n, t??lvvm??n, p??zzl??ttamm??n, njuhččm??n, vue?ssm??n, ǩie?ssm??n, suei?nnm??n, p??rǧǧm??n, č?hččm??n, k?lggm??n, skamm'm??n, rosttovm?

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:23 pm 
Avisaru
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The old Hebrews (pre-exile) used ordinals, but they adopted the babylonian (or whatever Euphrates-Tigris area civilisation that was current back then) month names:

Nissan - c.a March-April
Iyar - count months onwards
Sivan
Tammuz
Av
Elul
Tishri
Cheshvan
Kislev
Tevet
Shevat
Adar
(Adar II)

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:28 pm 
Avisaru
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Marvelous. Where did you get these other S?mi months? Interesting BTW the correspondance of Lule S?mi sjnj- with the nj- in the other langs.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 3:22 pm 
Avisaru
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The Russian names come from Latin:

Январь (Janvar')
Февраль (Fjebral')
Март (Mart)
Апрель (Aprjel')
Май (Maj)
Июнь (Ijun')
Июль (Ijul')
Август (Avgust)
Сентябрь (Sjentjabr')
Октябрь (Oktjabr')
Ноябрь (Nojabr')
Декабрь (Djekabr')

Although clearly they've gone through some changes.


Miekko wrote:
The old Hebrews (pre-exile) used ordinals, but they adopted the babylonian (or whatever Euphrates-Tigris area civilisation that was current back then) month names:

Nissan - c.a March-April
Iyar - count months onwards
Sivan
Tammuz
Av
Elul
Tishri
Cheshvan
Kislev
Tevet
Shevat
Adar
(Adar II)


The modern Hebrew names come from Latin:

Yanu'ar
Febru'ar
Mars (or Mertz)
'April
May
Yuni
Yuli
'Ogust
September
'Oktober
November
Detzember

Of course, the Jewish calendar is also used.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 4:04 pm 
Sanci
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Nikura wrote:

Welsh
ionawr, chwefror, mawrth, ebrill, mai, mehefin, gorphenaf, awst, medi, hydref, tachwedd, rhagfyr


gerar (?) (could be made on "januarium" or "ger" (freeze), făurar, mărţişor, prier, florar, cireşar, cuptor, secerar, vinicer, brumar, frunzar, ningău


The correct Welsh form is gorffenaf.

Now, about Romanian: gerar comes from januarium with a folk etymological influence of the word ger (< Lat. gelu) = frost, cold. However, the reverse change (i.e. n > r) is not unknown in Romanian, cf. Lat. corona > Romanian cunună.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 4:20 pm 
Niš
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Piero Lo Monaco wrote:
Nikura wrote:
Croatian Serbian uses latin names
siječanj, veljača, o?ujak, travanj, svibanj, lipanj, srpanj, kolovoz, rujan, listopad, studeni, prosinac

Slovenian Also uses latin names
prosinec, svečan, su?ec, mali traven, veliki traven, ro?nik, mali srpan, veliki srpan, kimavec, vinotok, listopad, gruden

Czech
leden, ?nor, březen, duben, květen, červen, červenec, srpen, z?ř?, ř?jen, listopad, prosinec


Czech and Croatian prosinec/prosinac means "december" while Slovenian uses prosinec for "january"? Strange. :?


Strange indeed, but it's more than that. Croatian names seem to come one month early, and so is Czech prosinec, while květen is one month late in comparison with Slovene, Polish, Byelorussian and Ukrainian names (when they correspond, that is).

As Nikura said, Slovenian also uses latin names - actually, it's those we normally use (januar, februar, marec, april, maj, junij, julij, avgust, september, oktober, november, december) and the traditional names are only printed on calendaries.

Anyway, here are some etymologies (the obvious ones):
Su?ec (March) - from suh - the dry month
Mali traven (April) - from trava - the little grass month
Veliki traven (May) - the big grass month
Ro?nik (June) - from ro?a - the flower month
Mali srpan (July) - from srp - the little sickle month
Veliki srpan (June) - the big sickle month
Vinotok (October) - from vino točiti - the wine-pouring month
Listopad (November) - from list, padati - the leaf-falling month


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 4:21 pm 
Sanci
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btw, these romanian month-names are not used in everyday speech, since they're dialectal, provincialisms, and folk names. They're correct, but this kind of 'parallel'-names exists in almost every language in the world.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 4:24 pm 
Sanci
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Nikura wrote:
Albanian
kallnuer, fruar/shkurt, mars, prill, maj, qershor, korrik, gusht, shtator, tetor, n?ntor, dhjetor/fruer


French In use during the French Revolution and Napoleon's Empire. Called "Republican Calendary"
niv?se, pluvi?se, vent?se, germinal, flor?al, prairial, messidor, thermidor, fructidor, vend?miaire, brumaire, frimaire
Being French, I'd like to use those names again... although I'm not particularily fan of Napoleon !!!

Romanian Uses latin names but these names also existed, they sometimes strangely remember Republican Calendary... would it be inspired by it?
gerar (?) (could be made on "januarium" or "ger" (freeze), făurar, mărţişor, prier, florar, cireşar, cuptor, secerar, vinicer, brumar, frunzar, ningău

We can also start to speak about it, and try to compare/explain etymologies etc etc. I think it can be interesting, don't you think too?


Good idea, Nikura. An etymological approach of the Albanian & Romanian (those which resemble the French Republican Calendary) months follows below:

kallnuer: I don't know where it comes from
fruar/shkurt: fruar < februarium; shkurt = short (because February has 28/29 days rather than 30/31)
mars < martium
prill < aprilem (note: an unstressed initial vowel often drops in Albanian)
maj < maium
qershor < qershi = cherry (< Lat. cerasus)
korrik < perhaps from a root korr- which means "to cut" (thus the month of harvest; I'm not sure)
gusht < augustum (note: an unstressed initial vowel often drops in Albanian)
shtator = seventh (a calque from the Latin name)
tetor = eighth (as above)
n?ntor = ninth (as above)
dhjetor/fruer: dhjetor = tenth (as above); fruer < perhaps from a root fry- meaning "to blow" (I'm not sure)

About the Romanian names: Those are the true, naturally evolved Romanian names (directly coming from Balkan Vulgar Latin); the other names (i.e. ianuarie, februarie etc.) entered Romanian via Church Slavonic (which accounts for the presence of an odd -m- in the name for October: Octombrie!). Etymology:

gerar < januarium (perhaps + "ger" = freeze)
făurar < februarium
mărţişor < martium (+ something else; maybe a diminutive suffixe)
prier < there's some connection with Lat. aprilim; however the absence of the first vowel may point to an Albanian intermediate; -er could be a diminutive suffix (< Lat. -ellum)
florar < floare < Lat. flos (-ris) = flower
cireşar < cireşa < Lat. cerasus = cherry
cuptor < maybe connected with Lat. coquo = to cook (I'm not sure)
secerar < Lat. seco = to cut
vinicer < Lat. vinum
brumar < Vulg. Lat. bruma = mist
frunzar < frunza = leaf (I don't know where "frunza" comes from)
ningău < Lat. ninguo = to snow

If anyone knows or remembers more than me, please, let him/her correct me.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 4:37 pm 
Sanci
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Hlewagastiz wrote:
the other names (i.e. ianuarie, februarie etc.) entered Romanian via Church Slavonic (which accounts for the presence of an odd -m- in the name for October: Octombrie!).


Quoting myself, I'd like to write something about that "odd -m-" in the name for October; I think it's a very interesting case.

This "odd -m-" is present only in languages spoken by people who are mainly "Orthodox" (or other Eastern-rite) Christians. Cf. Bulgarian: oktomvri; Romanian: octombrie; Armenian: ogtomper/oktomber; Georgian: oktomberi; Russian: oktjabr' (where -ja- comes from a Slavonic nasal, thus originally "oktombrie"). The most interesting case is that of Modern Greek (which maybe the key to the "mystery"): Although the correct (and accepted) form is "Oktovrios" (i.e. without any -m-), many people say "Oktomvrios"; in Byzantine times this was also written in the latter form! This is an error made by Byzantines (and then passed into Church Slavonic), due to analogy with other month names containing -m-, i.e. Dekemvrios, Septemvrios, Noemvrios. From Byzantine "pseudo-savant" Greek it passed to Church Slavonic (and thence to other Balkan languages), Armenian and Georgian. I say "pseudo-savant" because the natural Greek pronunciation (ever since) didn't tolerated the sequence [mv]; Greeks always said [mb] or just [b] (Southern Modern Greek). Greek "savants" consider sequences such as [mv], [nδ] as more elevated :? . So, many laymen imitated them in thinking that "Oktovrios" (without -m-) was a ... rustic pronunciation (poor guys!). Bulgarian seems to have taken the word directly from Greek rather than from Church Slavonic.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 4:41 pm 
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I'll just add a few things to Hlewagastiz's Romanian etymologies:
cuptor (< lat. *coctorium) is colloquial for 'extreme heat, heatwave'.
secerar (<lat. sicilare), similar to pop. Greek θεριστής. (secer@ = sickle)
frunz@ < lat. frondia <frons, -ndis

:D

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 4:48 pm 
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linguoboy wrote:
the like, but I've never seen them used in modern texts.

You should add the ancient Germanic month names as well. There's a very complete treatment of them here.


Wow! Dazi gets her very own month?

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 4:51 pm 
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chris-gr wrote:
I'll just add a few things to Hlewagastiz's Romanian etymologies:
cuptor (< lat. *coctorium) is colloquial for 'extreme heat, heatwave'.
secerar (<lat. sicilare), similar to pop. Greek θεριστής. (secer@ = sickle)
frunz@ < lat. frondia <frons, -ndis

:D


Thanks, chris-gr. Sorry for what I write on Greek "savant"; I didn't mean you, of course :D and I hope you've the same opinion. So, cuptor comes ultimately from Lat. coquo and secerar comes ultimately from Lat. seco (sicilare < sec-). I didn't know what you wrote on frunza. Now it's all clear to me. Thanks again 8) .

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 5:21 pm 
Avisaru
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Maknas wrote:
The modern Hebrew names come from Latin:

Yanu'ar
Febru'ar
Mars (or Mertz)
'April
May
Yuni
Yuli
'Ogust
September
'Oktober
November
Detzember

Of course, the Jewish calendar is also used.

Those look like they might've been relayed through Yiddisch.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 6:37 pm 
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gsandi wrote:
I have trouble understanding what you mean. Croatian (or the Croatian version of Serbo-Croatian if you prefer) emphatically does not use Latin names, as the above list shows. Serbian (or the Serbian version of Serbo-Croatian) does use Latin names, as does Russian. The Serbian forms are januar, februar, mart, etc.

So yes: in Serbo-croatian, serbian use latin forms, you just cited. and croatian variety allways (and not just emphatically) use the forms I gave.
chris-gr wrote:
btw, these romanian month-names are not used in everyday speech, since they're dialectal, provincialisms, and folk names. They're correct, but this kind of 'parallel'-names exists in almost every language in the world.

Indeed, I also found, some typical names for instance in dialects of Savoy (France). I think it is more interesting to study this kind of names than Latin name, for which we all know the origin.
About "frunze"
I thought "frunze" was of slavonic origin.... or from further Cf the city "Frunze" in Tadjikistan.... maybe it's just a coincidence lol: your origin chris-gr seems to me more plosible.
I'm not really sure about the parallelism between albanian "prill" and romanian "prier" but it could be an attraction from a same substratum word, seeming to latin "aprilis".

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 7:15 pm 
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Somebody knows why turkish names are so close to hebrew names?? I just can think they're also muslim calendar name in turkish... apity I can find now muslim calendar names just to compare the three. Sb has it?

About Hobbit month names:
I have a French edition of LotR and they are translated as well:
apr?s-No?l (after-Christmas)
solmath
rethe
astron
thrimidge
avant-Serein (serein = mid of the year)
apr?s-Serein
wedmath
halimath
winterfilth
blotmath
avant-No?l
I suppose -math means "month". Are those names directly taken from OE?? I think yes since Tolkien always replaced westron by english but... did he made some transformation or were they exactly like this in OE?

In Tatzic, I've made some kind of mix between slavonic and... other names. Let me explain it.
zabad (<zabd= name of the snow once fallen; see romanian name for snow)
xladnik (<xladn= cold + -nik suffix meaning "who does")
voduč(nik) (<vod(a)- = water + -uč suffix difining a change to; sometimes + -nik suffix)
?agor (<?a= black + gor= mountain; I mean without snow already)
cetnada ("nada" is just purely created and I've put later "cet-" from the hindi name "jeth")
gugc (<lithuanian "gegu?ė")
pogugc (< po-= after + gugc= june)
z?ř (<czech "z?ř?")
kolovoz (<croatian "kolovoz"... is it really from "kolo"=circle and "voz"=train ???!!)
vinotok (<slovenian "vinotok", I explain it in tatzic by vin(o)= old term for "wine" now we say "kin" + -tok= take, same origin than english)
ki? (<ki?= rain once fallen)
zuzc (I don't have any origin for this word, just from my invention, maybe from zuz= burn, with the need of wood in winter...)

I also have....
Hindi : (months are crossed, "m?gh" would be mid-january to mid-february)
m?gh, ph?gun, cait, bais?kh, jeth, as?rh, s?van, bh?d?, kv?r, k?rttik, aghan, p?s (soory I don't indicate retroflexity... just too lazy lol)
Bengali :
m?gh, f?lgun, c?itro, b?is?k, j?ishtho, ?sh?r, shr?bon, bh?dro, ?shwin, k?rtik, ogroh?yon, p?us
Nepali :
m?gh, ph?lgun, caitra, bais?kh, jyesth, ?s?dh, shr?wan, bh?dra, ?soj/?shwin, k?rtik, mangsir, push

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 8:05 pm 
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Nikura wrote:
kolovoz (<croatian "kolovoz"... is it really from "kolo"=circle and "voz"=train ???!!)


I suspect the -voz is related to osam 'eight', although I'm not sure if the Croatian form ever had initial v- like Russian does.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 8:06 pm 
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Nikura wrote:
About "frunze"
I thought "frunze" was of slavonic origin.... or from further Cf the city "Frunze" in Tadjikistan.... maybe it's just a coincidence lol:


A correction: Frunze was the Soviet-era name for the capital of Kyrgyzstan, not Tajikistan; it was named in honor of the early Bolshevik leader Mikhail Frunze. In 1991, it was renamed Bishkek (reflecting its pre-Soviet name of Bishkek/Pishpek).

Frunze himself was born in pre-Soviet Bishkek, but was apparently an ethnic Russian;
I have no idea if his name has any relation to the month-name frunzar in Rumanian, either via Latin or Slavic derivation.)

p@,
Glenn


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 10, 2005 8:22 pm 
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Glenn Kempf wrote:
A correction: Frunze was the Soviet-era name for the capital of Kyrgyzstan, not Tajikistan; it was named in honor of the early Bolshevik leader Mikhail Frunze. In 1991, it was renamed Bishkek (reflecting its pre-Soviet name of Bishkek/Pishpek). Frunze himself was born in pre-Soviet Bishkek, but was apparently an ethnic Russian;
I have no idea if his name has any relation to the month-name frunzar in Rumanian, either via Latin or Slavic derivation.)

Thank you for correct me. Indeed, it's Kyrgyzstan. I've been sily to put Tadjikistan since tadjik is iranian language and not turkic and I knew Frunze was capital of a turkic speaking country... Well.
So the name of this guy has maybe something to see with a slavonic word "frunze" that may come from latin of have a rapport with the leaf... Nevermind. :mrgreen:

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